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Old 23-10-2015, 18:28   #46
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

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Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
I guess I'm enamored with my Genoa sheet winches, as they along with my Milwaukee drill are my electric davit winches.
Just run the davit lines under the lower lifeline rail and from there to the winch, pull the trigger on the Miluwakee, take a swing of beer and the dinghy is up.
Your method is no different to mine, in so far as they both bring about the same result that is achieved by hauling on the tackles. The ‘keep it simple’ aficionados would decry both methods, if only for needing a means to charge the power source.
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Old 23-10-2015, 18:50   #47
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

I use rubber bands around all my clothing, bedding, towels and anything else that ends up in a locker that I end up digging through (same for traveling). I can toss things around in a locker or bag and quickly find what I'm looking for. Similarly, I have lots of ball-on-a-bungee available for canvas covers, mats, or bags in storage.
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Old 23-10-2015, 21:07   #48
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

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I use rubber bands around all my clothing, bedding, towels and anything else that ends up in a locker that I end up digging through (same for traveling). I can toss things around in a locker or bag and quickly find what I'm looking for. Similarly, I have lots of ball-on-a-bungee available for canvas covers, mats, or bags in storage.
Likewise we have little lightweight semi netting zip bags of different sizes around a couple of feet square, from an outdoors travel company. Shirts in one underclothes in another etc. we use them for both travel and sailing and they certainly keep things tidy.
I accidentally left one full of shirts at Best Western San Bruno last year.
Now I can say " I left my Shirts In San Francisco."
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Old 23-10-2015, 22:02   #49
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

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I noticed in a earlier posting in this thread, that Goosebumps mentioned having a manual windless. I have a 27 foot Hunter; most of my sailing is single handled. Pulling the anchor manually has been a struggle; might be related to age................

I'm interested in finding out who is using a manual windlass and what manufacturer etc. I prefer keeping it simple and not having to run wiring to the bow.........like to hear thoughts from others.

Mike

Reply Mwells, manual windlass lofrans is the make I chose. I believe all manual windlasses, horizontal with chain gypsey and rope drum work basically the same. Mine is rated at 600kg max wasn't too expensive, shipped it from UK to Mozambique shipping was free! I have now used the lofrans in number of situations and it does the job without back breaking acrobacy. With an electrical windlass, unavoidable for yacht +40 feet, a manual windlass wouldn't cope, in my set up of groundtackle, 8 mm chain, a 20kg Rocna, it copes well. Before arriving at anchor spot I lower anchor hanging just above the water. Then I position biat facing current or wind or both, relaese sheets, put engine in neutral, walk, not run, forward, and sit watching bottom waitong for boat to stop starting to reverse. I then try to liwer Rocna on sand, if many plants on bottom, lower enough to gave Rocna flat on bottom feed chain bit by bit playing with the windlass brake. With electrical windlass I used for years works very well but somehow to me I feel better with manual control.
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Old 23-10-2015, 22:22   #50
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

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I would actually like to offer an opposite view to all this “simple life” stuff.

Half a lifetime ago I lived aboard with my family in the Mediterranean for seven years, so I know what live-aboard is about. My wife and I are now planning to do it again aged 72.

I understand the theory of the simple boating life and there is nothing wrong with keeping things simple if it actually suits your lifestyle. But we are certainly not prepared to forgo anything we want to make our lives on board easier, just because they might prove complicated.

Okay, on a 45 footer you can have many things which would be a cram on a 30-35 footer. But nowadays, with all the electrical sources available there is no reason why people should not have devices which make life at sea that much better.

I have installed a freezer and just fitted a marine washer/dryer, which works perfectly both in harbour and at sea. We sleep on commercial air beds, which are a million times more comfortable than any quality of foam. They have an electric air pump, but can also be inflated by hand.

I built myself an electric dinghy winch, considerably reducing the effort of hauling the dinghy and outboard up on the davits. This is obviously more prone to failure than a simple block and tackle, but infinitely better and it hasn’t broken yet.

All my sails are roller furled, operated from the cockpit on winches using a winchrite electric winder. We have an electric windlass which has so far never failed, because I maintain the batteries in good order. This is much more satisfactory for us than the old hand cranked windlass it replaced.

Certainly, we’ve had problems with breakdowns, but since I installed most systems I can usually repair them myself, and I haven’t used any outside contractor for years.

This brings me to another observation over many years of sailing. A lot of simple life type boaters can’t afford to maintain their boats, and if something breaks down it is blamed on too complicated systems. Some are to lazy to maintain their boats, even when a good clean, or can of paint would make a big difference.



Good point but I didn't mean that those simple solutions exclude our gadgets for comfort, which I also have! I just realize how many good ideas we work into our liveaboard life as many here in their posts prove. I also realize that the ideas I had to improve my liveaboard when implemented made things soo much simpler and efficient. so I am after sharing those ideas and hear how they worked in our real liveaboard environment with zillions of challenges.
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Old 23-10-2015, 22:26   #51
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

wouldn't it be good idea for those members sharing their ideas to start their posting with the topic in caps?
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Old 23-10-2015, 22:35   #52
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

ANCHORING: MANUAL WINDLASS
I wanted to add that my change from electrical to manual windlass was such a great improvement I can't emphasize enough the benefits. simple installation, cheaper to buy, simple maintenance, longer life, very discreet when mounted, serves as strong pount on deck to throw line around for extra holding when working sails, no elctrical energy used, expensive electrical installation avoided, simplicity of use, very hands-on-anchoring....... If i would have a yacht of +40 feet Inwould seriously consider hydraulic windlass. the electrical windlasses simply never seem to cope with power needed. Lots of sailors seem to think that simply pushing windlass button will lift anchor out. Go liveaboard in the real world and find put soon how you have to go forward and play with the remote or foot switches trying tomnurse the haul in the anchor.
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Old 23-10-2015, 22:51   #53
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

Quote:
Originally Posted by mwells View Post
I noticed in a earlier posting in this thread, that Goosebumps mentioned having a manual windless. I have a 27 foot Hunter; most of my sailing is single handled. Pulling the anchor manually has been a struggle; might be related to age................

I'm interested in finding out who is using a manual windlass and what manufacturer etc. I prefer keeping it simple and not having to run wiring to the bow.........like to hear thoughts from others.

Mike
If you are patient, a weak man with a long rope can haul a heavy anchor with the right pully system.
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Old 24-10-2015, 00:41   #54
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

Ok, I will show my ignorance, why does everyone know not to use those connector thingies? Is it an electrolysis thing?
[img] http://www.thepaintstore.com/v/vspfi.../25-003-2T.jpg [/img]
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Old 24-10-2015, 07:15   #55
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

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Originally Posted by mausgras View Post
Ok, I will show my ignorance, why does everyone know not to use those connector thingies? Is it an electrolysis thing?
[img] http://www.thepaintstore.com/v/vspfi.../25-003-2T.jpg [/img]
I believe that the main reason the plastic screw-on connectors are not used is due to the motion and vibration on board that may result in a disconnect over time. Sparking loose live wires can be a hazard!
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Old 24-10-2015, 07:44   #56
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

HAIR TIES
We use hair ties for lots of things...the kind you get in most any drugstore or supermarket. Hair ties last longer and are tougher than similarly-sized elastic bands. I use them to pull my curtains back, roll up plastic bags, organize electronic cables, extension cords, etc.

I also use our fishing pole stored near the cabin top as an indoor clothesline.
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Old 24-10-2015, 07:56   #57
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Roger View Post
I would actually like to offer an opposite view to all this “simple life” stuff.
Half a lifetime ago I lived aboard with my family in the Mediterranean for seven years, so I know what live-aboard is about. My wife and I are now planning to do it again aged 72.
I understand the theory of the simple boating life and there is nothing wrong with keeping things simple if it actually suits your lifestyle. But we are certainly not prepared to forgo anything we want to make our lives on board easier, just because they might prove complicated.
Okay, on a 45 footer you can have many things which would be a cram on a 30-35 footer. But nowadays, with all the electrical sources available there is no reason why people should not have devices which make life at sea that much better.
I have installed a freezer and just fitted a marine washer/dryer, which works perfectly both in harbour and at sea. We sleep on commercial air beds, which are a million times more comfortable than any quality of foam. They have an electric air pump, but can also be inflated by hand.
I built myself an electric dinghy winch, considerably reducing the effort of hauling the dinghy and outboard up on the davits. This is obviously more prone to failure than a simple block and tackle, but infinitely better and it hasn’t broken yet.
All my sails are roller furled, operated from the cockpit on winches using a winchrite electric winder. We have an electric windlass which has so far never failed, because I maintain the batteries in good order. This is much more satisfactory for us than the old hand cranked windlass it replaced.
Certainly, we’ve had problems with breakdowns, but since I installed most systems I can usually repair them myself, and I haven’t used any outside contractor for years.
This brings me to another observation over many years of sailing. A lot of simple life type boaters can’t afford to maintain their boats, and if something breaks down it is blamed on too complicated systems. Some are to lazy to maintain their boats, even when a good clean, or can of paint would make a big difference.
Having trifled with both of the lifestyles you describe, I will speak up for the Great Unwashed. During my conspicuous consumer workaholic days I owned both a brand new Mooney Ovation DX (the fastest four place nonturbocharged aircraft available) and a 1975 Bellanca Decathlon (simple stick and rudder plane without any traveling conveniences.)

The Mooney cost half a million dollars to purchase, $6800 per year for insurance, was infinitely complex and luxurious and had redundant systems galore. Leather articulating seats? Check. Four place oxygen? Check. 185 Knots cruise? Check. The Decathlon had an engine and wings. Which one did I prefer to fly? You guessed it, the Decathlon won based on its simplicity and connection to the pilot.

Having interviewed tens of thousands of people during my life about their intimate personal details one of my observations was that wealthy people are not generally happy people. Often they are elitist, judgemental and caviling- and seem completely disconnected from their surrounding environment. To imply that people who prefer simple boats and simple systems do so primarily because they either can't afford the good stuff or are simply lazy and unclean represents a despicable attitude IMO.

Seven years ago at age 52 during a thermonuclear nasty divorce I decided to chuck it all and live a simple life without being a slave to work and money and I have not regretted a moment since. I truly love working on "old stuff" and have no use at all for an onboard washing machine or electrical gadgets doomed to premature failure which I cannot fix myself. Learning how things work gives me a lot of pleasure, my own cooking tastes better and I have time to read and learn new hobbies such as playing a ukelele and learning how to salsa.

Despite my oath of poverty, I have been with a beautiful intelligent significant other (who still does the executive rat race thing) for four years and can stay in her huge luxurious home whenever I desire, but I prefer to stay in my primitive boat, living like a barbarian I work when I went and if I want and could easily support myself working three days a month. This is my definition of freedom.

Here's a simple idea- Keep It Simple Stupid.
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Old 24-10-2015, 08:46   #58
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

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Originally Posted by Hudson Force View Post
I believe that the main reason the plastic screw-on connectors are not used is due to the motion and vibration on board that may result in a disconnect over time. Sparking loose live wires can be a hazard!
Another reason, the end of the wire is left open so much easier for moisture to penetrate and the wire corrode. A proper crimp connector seals the wires.

Also, I'm not really sure how well wire nuts work on stranded wire which is all that should be used on a boat. I believe the original purpose was for solid wire used in homes.
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Old 24-10-2015, 09:14   #59
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

The wire nuts do work just fine on stranded wire used in DC systems they do not seal the wire from corrosion and vibrations can and do cause them to get loosened excelerating the corrosion. All causing heating due to poor connections.( possibly causing a fire.) . Crimp connections are better best however is to solder the wires together and cover them with shrink tube. IMO you should also use shrink tube on crimp connections to seal out moisture.
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Old 24-10-2015, 11:08   #60
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Re: Those Simple Ideas Liveaboards Have to Improve Life

I thought my last paragraph might raise some hackles and I don’t mind being to be taken to task for it. I therefore tried to choose my words carefully and didn’t mean to imply that (all) people who prefer simple boats and simple systems do so primarily because they either can't afford the good stuff or are simply lazy.
If we are splitting hairs maybe I should have said, “I have met a lot of simple life boaters who......”
Clearly, Azul falls into neither of these categories because he has the envious advantage of being able to have it both ways.
I feel the need to apologize to Goosebumps, because I miss-interpreted his post, which was not so much about people, as about ideas which make for simpler boating. I’m all for these, and employ a lot of them on my otherwise very sophisticated little ship.
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