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Old 09-03-2014, 10:10   #76
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Re: Thinking too much about Danger

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuffr2 View Post
I am hoping only taller sailors have this 'banged head' syndrome. How tall are you guys that have banged your head? Does a person 5' 9" have the same danger?

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Following the path with roverhi... I WAS 5' 9-1/4" .... So you can see that you are squarely in the danger zone... I think the tall folk are "used" to ducking...

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Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
Your taller sailor surmise doesn't hold true for me. Used to be 5'7" till i managed to pound myself down to 5'6" jamming my head into immovable objects.
I will be 5' 8" in just a matter of time...

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Originally Posted by Andrew Troup View Post
I guess it's biomechanics: a little old calf muscle has to lift an entire adult's bodyweight, and to make the struggle less unequal, we utilise every trick we can, such as the energy storage and recovery of the achilles tendon and the momentum effect of a suddenly applied force.

I don't pretend to understand in any detail, but think how much more a weightlifter can 'jerk', in comparison with trying to lift slow and smoothly.
Mostly in jest Andrew... I totally see how we "bound up" the first step with momentum.... What really hurts is the calculation involved...

(A seriously dummed down approximation for amusement purposes only, ie. incompressible bodies)

V(f) = V(i) +At (velocity final=velocity initial + (de)acceleration x time)
solving for A (deceleration at hatch impact)
0 ft/s = 5 ft/s +A(0.25s)
A= - 20 ft/s*s

F=MA
Solving for F
F=175 lb x - 20 ft/s*s

F= 3500 lb = ouch =
(but it's only for a bazzillionth of a second, and doesn't consider even a fraction of the the included factors such as neck compression deceleration)

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Old 09-03-2014, 10:56   #77
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Re: Thinking too much about Danger

On the last night of our first powerboat charter, we were safely and snuggly asleep in the aft cabin of a Bayliner 3288. In the middle of the pitch black night, a HUGE CLANG was heard from the direction of the bow and I leapt up and headed up the small companionway only to smash my head full speed into the closed hatch.

It hadn't been closed when I went to bed. Apparently my partner had decided it was 'prudent' and helpfully sealed us into our cabin. At this point I was panicked and reeling from the force of the collision and not in a place to address this train of logic politely. I managed to slide the hatch open and then almost immediately smashed my face into the previously unlocked sliding door to the cockpit. A few more muttered words were heard amid my growing fear we were moments away from sinking slowly into the mud and confused thoughts about waivers and liability.

The lock worked using a skeleton key from both sides. I hadn't locked it since we were in a secure marina, so I had no idea where the key was. I could now see lights flashing from the bow and some sort of boat floating around in the dark and my panic ramped up as I woozily tried to find the damned key.

Eventually I struggled drunkenly and half dressed out on the deck. and tried not to end up in the drink and I made my way to the bow. I arrived, one hand for the boat and one for my throbbing head, to find a harbour patrol boat stuffed with uniformed men just swinging around to head out. Seeing me swaying on the foredeck they offered up an explanation for the clang. It seems their helmsman had gotten a bit too cocky swinging around initially and smashed their anchor into our anchor with an excessive bit of force.

"No problem, no problem," they assured me as they then puttered off. I just stood there holding a growing goose-egg on my head, still wondering why we weren't sinking.

When I returned to bed (leaving everything unlocked and open behind me like I had the first time), she opened her eyes and asked, quite unconcernedly, what the ruckus was all about. Then she rolled over to go back to sleep.

And now, thanks to HappyMdRSailor's calculations, I can finally understand why I was so dumbfounded. Hopefully I can now move on and get over the residual trauma from that 'dangerous' night...
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Old 09-03-2014, 11:09   #78
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Re: Thinking too much about Danger

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macblaze View Post
On the last night of our first powerboat charter, we were safely and snuggly asleep in the aft cabin of a Bayliner 3288. In the middle of the pitch black night, a HUGE CLANG was heard from the direction of the bow and I leapt up and headed up the small companionway only to smash my head full speed into the closed hatch.

It hadn't been closed when I went to bed. Apparently my partner had decided it was 'prudent' and helpfully sealed us into our cabin. At this point I was panicked and reeling from the force of the collision and not in a place to address this train of logic politely. I managed to slide the hatch open and then almost immediately smashed my face into the previously unlocked sliding door to the cockpit. A few more muttered words were heard amid my growing fear we were moments away from sinking slowly into the mud and confused thoughts about waivers and liability.

The lock worked using a skeleton key from both sides. I hadn't locked it since we were in a secure marina, so I had no idea where the key was. I could now see lights flashing from the bow and some sort of boat floating around in the dark and my panic ramped up as I woozily tried to find the damned key.

Eventually I struggled drunkenly and half dressed out on the deck. and tried not to end up in the drink and I made my way to the bow. I arrived, one hand for the boat and one for my throbbing head, to find a harbour patrol boat stuffed with uniformed men just swinging around to head out. Seeing me swaying on the foredeck they offered up an explanation for the clang. It seems their helmsman had gotten a bit too cocky swinging around initially and smashed their anchor into our anchor with an excessive bit of force.

"No problem, no problem," they assured me as they then puttered off. I just stood there holding a growing goose-egg on my head, still wondering why we weren't sinking.

When I returned to bed (leaving everything unlocked and open behind me like I had the first time), she opened her eyes and asked, quite unconcernedly, what the ruckus was all about. Then she rolled over to go back to sleep.

And now, thanks to HappyMdRSailor's calculations, I can finally understand why I was so dumbfounded. Hopefully I can now move on and get over the residual trauma from that 'dangerous' night...
AWESOME STORY!!!!

We need a group.... HBA
Hatch Bangers Anon....
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Old 09-03-2014, 11:35   #79
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Re: Thinking too much about danger

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Originally Posted by bobconnie View Post
Gee, with all the auto and truck wrecks, house fires, crazy folks holding up everything ! I guess the only thing to do is sit at home all locked in and maybe you might be safe ?? Maybe so, but I know I feel a lot safer at sea where Im at least somewhat in control of what happens to us !
Too true. Last year I went into a dock and when I arrived one of the first things I did was fix the lock on the pilothouse door. A lady asked me if I felt safe all by myself. I said "Yes, out there but since I'm here at a dock with dirt dwellers around I figured I'd better put a lock on the door"

For some reason she didn't appreciate the comment. I must learn to be more tactful. A LOT more tactful. (sigh)
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Old 09-03-2014, 15:43   #80
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Re: Thinking too much about danger

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Originally Posted by tuffr2 View Post
I am the OP - I am a very positive person. Just wanted to hear from others that are actually sailing and making passages. What 'not so good things' have happened to you. All replies are appreciated as I am trying to learn.

I will say a little prayer (like someone else kinda mentioned) "Oh Lord, don't let me do anything really stupid".
As is mentioned, most offshore trips are pretty event free. Plan for the worst, hope for the best! You get many, many more calms than storms.

However, you asked about "issues"
In a lifetime of sailing, only really a few. We hit a huge log off Borneo, at about 7 knots. That was scary for a few mins.
We had lightning strike the water either side of the boat simultaneously, with 20m of us in the Malacca Strait. That was scary for the duration of that storm.
We turned around in the Indian Ocean in 2011 due to Pirates, when a boat ahead of us went "missing". That was a nervous period...
Had 2 run-ins with armed "Authorities" despite doing nothing wrong (corruption issues), threathened with guns and jail if I did not pay up (there were no legitimate outstanding fees).
Been in a few heavy weather situations. Oh yeah, and I've been aground a couple of times - although never serious. Also had a few gear failures - the boom being the most serious.
All that being said - don't let it put you off. 9-5 is not existing. GO have an Adventure, you really won't regret it.
Matt
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Old 09-03-2014, 16:29   #81
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Re: Thinking too much about Danger

Neps' gear - what happened when you hit that log? Was your rudder ok? Also when the lightning hit close to the boat did it fry any electronics? How many pair of underwear did you go thru during that storm?



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Old 09-03-2014, 17:04   #82
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Re: Thinking too much about Danger

When we hit the log we were lucky in where it actually physically hit. As these things are, it was about 1am, and pitch black. There was a loud thump, followed a split second later by a huge crash, and the boat went from 7 knots to about 1. As you can imaging (I was off watch) I lept out of bed, My wife, Jo, reported " a log I think " (we had seen several others, including whole trees over the last few days). We never did see this one! I pulled the floorboards, inspected the keel bolts etc, but could find nothing. When it was light, put on the mask and snorkel and went to have a look. There was a scar in the gelcoat under the bow, and then a split in the gelcoat on the front of the keel, maybe 200mm down from the hull. I think what happend was we rode up on it, then smacked it with the keel. We must have hit near one end, because it did not touch the boat again. Lucky really, considering the number of these in the water in that area. You really could lose a boat here with a bit of bad luck.

The lightning. This was one of the most violent thunder storms I've ever seen. Turns out that the Malacca Strait is one of the most lightening prone areas in the world. This particular forked strike lifted the boat bodily a few inches! It was like an artillery barrage. We were very fortunate - no damage. Several boats in the area were hit, and suffered a lot of damage, one Cat almost sunk when a cross flash came out thru her chain-plates removing a section of hull. We have a 35mm cable from the mast foot to a keel bolt - the connection is short, and pretty straight. The connections are clean. We should have the same potential difference as the seawater around us. The Cat did not have this, but did try to have a chain from the stay to the water. It was not it the water, as when the storm started they were too frightened to touch the rigging...

Storms - Never had more than 40 - 50 knots in the tropics, and then only short duration. In the high lats, we have had a couple. Spent a few days on the parachute anchor (pardy method). Never thought we would die or the boat give up, but you sure do wonder why you are doing this!!!

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Old 11-03-2014, 20:28   #83
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Re: Thinking too much about Danger

I have been reading about lightning and I guess the jury is out as to the best way to protect sailboats.

I was taught was a kid, a lightning storm is coming so stay away from the water. Get out of the pool, stop fishing, race to the dock and get out of the boat.

Now, not only stay on the boat but a boat with a 55' to 65' foot mast. For some reason I think lightning is worse over water than land.

I would have never guessed lightning could/would lift a boat a few inches upward as it hit nearby water.

Glad you made it thru both hitting the log and the lightning.

And thanks

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Old 11-03-2014, 20:36   #84
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Re: Thinking too much about Danger

My greatest fear is an angry cook.


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