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Old 17-02-2016, 14:05   #1
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Sous Vide anyone

was no sure where to ask this question but this seemed like the place to start any suggestions and I will repost else where.

So is anyone living on the hook currently using a marine version or normal version of sous vide cooking? I have only been able to find one company making a dedicated marine sous vide unit. It seems to me to be an ideal way to cook while under way.
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Old 17-02-2016, 15:54   #2
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

for those not familiar.
Sous-vide (/suːˈviːd/; French for "under vacuum")[1] is a method of cooking in which food is sealed in airtight plastic bags then placed in a water bath or in a temperature-controlled steam environment for longer than normal cooking times—96 hours or more, in some cases—at an accurately regulated temperature much lower than normally used for cooking, typically around 55 °C (131 °F) to 60 °C (140 °F) for meat and higher for vegetables. The intent is to cook the item evenly, ensuring that the inside is properly cooked without overcooking the outside, and retain moisture.


Basically you take lets say a steak, vacuum seal it in a bag and place it in a water bath of precisely controlled temperature. we will set it for 130 or medium rare, the steak will never over cook, you could leave it for 3 hours or 9 hours and it will still be medium rare. Time is not an issue it will not get over done. This especially nice for chicken breasts they never get dried out and tough because its never over cooked. If you like a crust or sear you simple do it after removing it from the vacuum bag on a hot pan or grill. excellent way to cook chicken or vegetables. Marine sous vide unit runs of the battery pack or the engine heat and is sealable so the water does not become an issue. But it is impossible to over cook your meal and can be started hours before its needed.
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Old 17-02-2016, 16:17   #3
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Not an expert because it has scared me off.

My sister-in-law bought an advanced book on sous-vide and related techniques, and gave it to us because she didn't want to try it and we're more adventurous cooks than she is.

We looked through it, found it interesting reading, but concluded that it was way too complicated and too risky (danger of improperly cooked food if you don't do it right) for us to try.

This is in our home kitchen, not on a boat. I'm not sure what equipment, power source, etc. you would need to make it work on a boat.

But, repeat, not an expert ... if someone else has actually done it and will tell me it's easier than it looks maybe we'll try it.
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Old 17-02-2016, 16:31   #4
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

it is actually very simple and with the technology available nearly fool proof. Most Michelin rated restaurants use it. There is a company making marine based unit that runs of the battery, solar, or engine with all being choices depending on the situation.
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Old 17-02-2016, 16:39   #5
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Well, I'll look into the equipment, but in my mind "Most Michelin rated restaurants use it" is not an indication that it's suitable for home use. Unlike me, they actually know what they're doing.

From what you say the appropriate equipment is available and runs off available power sources, so at that point it should just be a question of using it properly. So I'll back off now and see if someone with actual experience has something to say.
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Old 17-02-2016, 16:46   #6
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

they use it because it is incredibly consistent you really can't mess it up. Food stay moist and will not over cook.
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Old 17-02-2016, 16:47   #7
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Never thought of trying it on a boat, but it is a great way to make tender beef ribs and then finish on the grill.

No real risk of dangerous food, provided you check core temp of meat with a good accurate thermometer (like ThermoPop/Pen).
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Old 17-02-2016, 17:03   #8
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Moven on the water


found this, I'm a serial entrepreneur and major foodie, started thinking this was the perfect way to cook while under way uses existing heat or power sources and requires no or little attention after preparation. You could literally vacuum seal a few weeks worth of meals and freeze them. then just toss them in the sous vide unit when you wanted them. Like your beef ribs sear them off using just a tiny fraction of the propane you would have needed to cook the meal under normal situations. Was going to be the first sous vide marine company but I was beat to it.
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Old 17-02-2016, 17:17   #9
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Okay, now you've got me interested. This presents some practical aspect that I hadn't considered wrt pre-preparation and related convenience, and my limited experience has shown me how useful that could be.

Please pass on anything you learn; I'll look into it all a bit more and consider offering myself as a tester / taster.
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Old 17-02-2016, 17:53   #10
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Probably half the proteins on CHARDONNAY are cooked in a waterbath (sous vide means that they are packed under vacuum and not all are); some fragile fish, for example, need to be sealed but not vacuumed. We have used both a Polyscience immersion circulator and a Sous Vide Supreme (demi). The inverter can easily handle the electrical load and wind and solar keep up. For those not familiar with sous vide and other modernist techniques I'd refer you to Modernist Cuisine at Home, a great if expensive introduction. For a book of recipes I'd suggest Douglas Baldwin's Sous Vide for the Home Cook. I've used these techniques for years...
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Old 17-02-2016, 21:54   #11
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Highly recommended but I currently only do sous vide at home. If you are using an immersion circulator there is really no down side - compact to store away, use your regular pot for the water bath and if you have limited power on the boat then insulate (styrofoam cooler maybe? A lid for reduced evaporation losses does wonders but a bit tough with an immersion unit).
Although you can run a sous vide setup for tens of hours, most of my dishes only take 3 hours or so.
You won't be able to run it while you are moving but it's fine on the hook and I don't see an issue with marine air as the device is meant to be used in a high humidity environment.
It is really a superb way to cook and I also use it for re-heating previously cooked dishes that were vacuum bagged and frozen. I just wish I had a freezer on the boat ...
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Old 19-02-2016, 12:08   #12
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Steaks on the boat are great when cooked sous vide. No special equipment needed, I put them in each steak in a ziplock bag after seasoning with salt and pepper, add a bit of butter, squeeze the air out and they're ready to go.
I use the small cooler that often transports a couple beers to the beach, fill it with hot water from the tap (with a bit added from the stovetop pot). Measure the temp with the infrared thermometer used for checking the engine.
Steaks go in 145-150 degree water inside cooler which is wrapped in a beach towel. A couple hours later the meat is about 130-140 degrees. It then needs a quick pass on a hot grill to get the seared edges and right color.
The steaks remain thick and juicy, cleanup is simple.
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Old 19-02-2016, 14:20   #13
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Yum. Thats an idea, passive sous vide (no active heating) and then bring up to finishing temp/texture on the grill. Might have to try that one.

One challenge is that many smallish boat grills run really hot. My Magma is quite hot even on low. Ashore, a techique I use a lot is "reverse sear"...basically slow cook on the cooler end of the grill and then move to the hot side to sear and bring to disired appearance and finishing temp. I sometimes start the slow cook process using sous vide (a lot easier and more consistent than tending coals for hours. Will have to sort out how to do something similar on the boat.

We have a Wonder Bag aboard which should work well for a passive sous vide set up.

For those doing "active" sous vide aboard using an inverter, do you have a feel for how many AH you are drawing per hour of cook time?
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Old 19-02-2016, 14:37   #14
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnglaisInHull View Post
...
We looked through it, found it interesting reading, but concluded that it was way too complicated and too risky (danger of improperly cooked food if you don't do it right) for us to try.

...
Something to keep in mind re food saftey is that what you are actually doing is pasteurizing the meat (a function of time & temp). While FDAs recommended safe finishing temps for beef is 165F, because a very brief time at that temp has a very high pathogen kill rate, what really matters is the total time & temp. For example, you can achieve the same kill rate over longer time at lower temp. There are tables available that show ranges of times & temps. It does require a bit more effort and close attention to time & temp (with a good quality thermo), but the results are awesome.

This additional attention to detail is, I think, one reason the FDA just recommends one simple high target temp.

Once you add heat to the meat over a long time via sous vide, you can bring it up to higher temps, if desired, quite quickly on the grill and dont end up with charred meat on the outside due to longer times at high grill temps.

Starting quality of meat is a factor too. Most meats here in Central America I finish at higher temps because food handling here is usually not exactly up to FDA standards. But, there are a few pro butchers (very few here) who I trust more.

Whereas meat from a typical "Carneceria" you definately want to finish at 165F!
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Old 04-10-2016, 17:35   #15
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Re: Sous Vide anyone

I've been cooking sous vide for a number of years now and I really wonder why I would ever go back. I love it! I cook more than I would otherwise and toss the extra in the fridge. I crank up the water bath when I get home from work and toss in the leftovers. When the water is up to temp my dinner is done.

I moved away from Seattle and my boat to work a contract that went longer than expected in Georgia. So I bought a second boat to live on here. What I've discovered with sous vide aboard here is that I have to carefully manage my AC load before sous vide-ing. I lower the AC and turn off hot water. I'm really not used to this much AC and luxury on a boat.

My feeling is that if I can create a cooler with a cut out for the circulator and my system can handle the peak load of heating the water, the total amp hours should be pretty low. In a tank it's not that bad anyway(I don't have the numbers anymore), and that's with no insulation.

For voyaging it's easy to sous vide bags of food at a dock and toss them in the fridge. I have an 80 watt crock pot that would heat them up just fine or I could toss them in a pot on the stove.

The reason I found this thread is because I was looking to see if anyone was filling the pot with sea water. Since it never touches the food it should work fine, but what about the immersion circulator?
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