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Old 18-11-2013, 12:21   #61
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

Once you get to a reasonable size with most creature comforts as the dirt, and keep it clean/maintained/picked up you probable not be refereed to as Homeless. Quite the opposite as most will be impressed. I made sure they notice my wedding ring and I always mention my wife, so they do not get the wrong idea.

As mentioned before we use to moor at the /south end of Lake Union, down town Seattle, in front of a popular meat/pick up places, Blue Water. There were usually equal or more females then males. Single Live a boards or boat owners, male or female, had not trouble meeting people. Seattle is a very liberal city so gender/sexual preference was not a big thing. Each marina we had gay/lesbian neighbors. What ever you were looking for was there.

Location, location, location is the key.

True story:

My grand son 16 at the time, came to live with us on summer as he could not get a job in his town. So I got him a job at the Blue Water as we know the owners. Well, that lasted one night as the ladies notices how he blushed and shy. Especially when they found out he was a virgin. His mother, my daughter would have killed me it she knew what he learned saw that night.

My single sons also use to come by the boat, to borrow our dog, Brittany. Brittany was a chick magnet. Girls love babies and dogs/pets. When I took Brittany for her walks, met ladies all the time, and then if they found out I live on a boat in the marina, many times had to show them my wedding ring and mention I was happily married. I got many hugs as ladies like to hug as a greeting/good by. So make sure you ae hugable!
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Old 18-11-2013, 15:40   #62
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

Overheard in the Marina office the other day that we have about 35 live-a-boards out of 400 slips. They also told the folks that in the summer the weekenders increase substantially.

I agree with In Training... The key word may be Adventurous! I have a 35' boat and a 1,000 sq.ft. mtn cabin. Neither especially luxurious, but clean, comfortable, and in good repair. It's not for everyone, but great for someone seeking relaxation, casual, and active outdoor experiences.

And yes! RunningRabbit we too somersault out of the vberth as well as squeeze past each other between the saloon table and galley.
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Old 12-11-2016, 15:16   #63
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by rw58ph View Post
If you do find a female that is willing be involved with a person that lives on a boat then count yourself one of the luck ones and hold on to her. Most of us long term live a boards cater/spoil our SO/wife as we do the majority of the pink duties and all the blue duties. You have to provide enough benefits to more than off set the hard ships. You have to work at it!

Sounds like you got it figured out.
It only takes a few creature comforts and a man that can navigate. Personally, I get lost in a parking lot.
Time to take navigation class, lol,


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Old 14-11-2016, 12:14   #64
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

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Sounds like you got it figured out.
It only takes a few creature comforts and a man that can navigate. Personally, I get lost in a parking lot.
Time to take navigation class, lol,


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I know how to navigate
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Old 15-11-2016, 22:37   #65
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

Navigation is good.
Want to learn to chart and plot a course. I think really important.
Never really been off shore. I guess not a problem if coastal and view land.



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Old 16-11-2016, 17:21   #66
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

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Navigation is good.
Want to learn to chart and plot a course. I think really important.
Never really been off shore. I guess not a problem if coastal and view land.



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Lorrie,

Actually, give it another think. IME coastal is far more challenging than offshore, because coastal is where the hard bits are shallow. Offshore, they're farther apart.

Some people do freak out about being out of sight of land, it never bothered me, after I had an epiphany when I realized that at only 5 miles offshore, I probably would not be able to swim ashore. I already knew the depth of water to float you doesn't matter much, once you're afloat, if the water's a mile deep or a foot deep--you're floating. But the effort involved in getting ashore from only that far off, and safely in through the breakers, and rocks (if any, the left coast has a lot of rocky coastline) --nope, probably wouldn't make it, although in easy sight of land.

However, heading offshore out of sight of land did not bother me, although I have heard people express that thought. It may not bother you, either, when the time comes.

Ann
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Old 16-11-2016, 17:59   #67
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by lorrie View Post
Navigation is good.
Want to learn to chart and plot a course. I think really important.
Never really been off shore. I guess not a problem if coastal and view land.



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Lorrie, my partner and I have done all our sailing on inland mountain lakes, when I expressed my trepidation for ocean sailing, our friend (an experienced cruiser) assured me that, for the most part, ocean sailing is easier. I still can't vouch for that as we are unexpectedly stuck in Colorado another two weeks, but I will bet your skills are much better than you realize. hth
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Old 16-11-2016, 18:14   #68
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

I wouldn't worry about navigation, these days with multiple gps's it's just like a simple video game, no more of the old fashion navigation skills.
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Old 16-11-2016, 18:39   #69
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

I think we all underestimate our capabilities. You find out what you are made of when it really counts. I remember when Dennis Connor ran us off the start line in his wooden boat in San Diego. We were sailing with 50 percent disabled crew of 10. Most crew had never sailed together. We barely missed a collusion with the start boat. We missed it by inches as we bailed out of the start.
We were nick named the out of control boat. At our speed, I may not be here to talk about it, crazy.
I often wonder who the hell insured the program. Later we became a good crew, often with a good coach, doing well enough to get 3rd place.
I do believe the racing is probably far more dangerous than offshore. Not sure If I can handle being in the big ocean, not knowing where I am.
I do believe if I had the experienced Captain willing to teach me, it may be possible. Need to get more experience. I hear too many stories, electronics fail.



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Old 16-11-2016, 18:41   #70
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Re: Social aspects of cruising and living-aboard

USN Navigator in the 70's. Indian Ocean. No GPS, No LORAN. Only Sextant, Radar, Visual, Fathometer and a whole lot of DR. God I love GPS.

USS LaSalle '77-'78 QM2

Ken
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