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Old 09-03-2014, 23:22   #46
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

bcholette, check your PMs.
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Old 09-03-2014, 23:48   #47
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

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Doug and I are currently researching the mythical Westsail 39.
Rare boat, the WS39 is. I know where one is available.
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Old 10-03-2014, 21:44   #48
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

Curious why the pilothouse? Higher latitude fun?

There are some great boats out there on the market, and your budget is sufficient to get something pretty nice, particularly if you can scale down the size a little. We sail a Pacific Seacraft 34, and while it is smaller than what you are after, I paid a little less than 60k, because of high hours on motor and the boat had no electronics, and a depressed boat market in 2010. Nevertheless, it was impeccably maintained by a german engineer owner, who left the most complete set of maintenance records with tiny, tidy, handwriting.

Be open to the brand of boat, and continually revisit your priorities. Consider resale. Don't worry about electronics. Worry about the important stuff like decks, rig, engine, self-steer, power plan, reefir, canvas/cushions/mattresses, etc. Electronics change a lot, and you can do research on Panbo or here and add the ones you want. Since you are on a budget, you can do a basic system with a 7" chartplotter (maybe with a modern HD radome) AIS (at least a Matrix VHF), and some basic instruments like depth and wind. Most are going with a satellite phone these days, with hefty minute packages for voice and data, but lots of us still use SSB/HAM radio. Much of this is portable if you sell your boat and move up. Check out some 35-37 footers. Some are quite spacious - the pilothouse may slow things down, but gotta get what you want.

Have fun. Big time. There is nothing like bobbing around in a remote anchorage after all the effort of becoming a capable sailor, and effectively outfitting a boat for cruising.

Take care to get the things you will use the most, realizing you will be at anchor most of the time. Creature comforts like plenty of fresh water, hot water, plenty of power from a well designed system with multiple charging sources, and little stuff like a cockpit shower will be appreciated.
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Old 10-03-2014, 22:18   #49
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

[QUOTE=HBWT;1475800]Ykeep in mind on your journey looking at boats.


2) I know this is hotly contested but having an exposed rudder on a Beneteau or Jeaneau is not the smartest of choices. They are gorgeous boats and perfect if you plan on sailing to Catalina and back. A ocean sailing experience is taking a gamble.

hum - i guess i should not have sailed my 40' jeanneau ds40 all the way around the caribbean and then across the atlantic -- and now sailing thru the med? just asking --
jeanneau makes a great boat
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Old 10-03-2014, 22:49   #50
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

Old guy advice:

Let me suggest that you look only for boats that are well known today, sold in volume, and that are often used for charter. Don't look for a blue water specialized, well equipped cruiser.

Several reasons to do this.

First, if you have a loan on it, you won't take off for Fiji. Face it.

So get something that works great as a live aboard, and more-or-less day sailor that is great to just day sail, and for port to port hopping.

Second, neither of you actually know that you will like this whole live aboard cruising lifestyle. Many people find they really do not.

So you may need to sell this boat again. The well known, currently marketed, currently popular in large production, are just easier to sell used. They dominate the market volume (both new and used), because they are attractive, they are easy to sell, they are quick to sell, and the price is pretty easy to identify. Everyone knows you can buy a Hunter 40 for $100K. Everyone knows that. So you can buy it for that, and sell it for that if you decide that Aspen suits you better than Cabo.

Third, the part of a boat that costs the most -- to buy and maintain -- is the "systems" of the boat: electrical, diesel, electrical, AC, DC, charging, switching, distribution, batteries, lighting, toilets, holding tanks and their pumps, water tanks, hot water heater, water pressure pumps, air-conditioning, heating, fans, spars, vang, travelers, reefing, hoisting, furling, standing rigging, running rigging, ...

The charter boats are nice, roomy, equipped for living and playing. They have robust, reliable systems that are easy, quick, and cheap to fix with good parts availability. They are well documented. They are built very strong, as they are often abused and sailed far, far more than the typical marina queen. They have what actually gets used, like fresh water capacity.

And finally, the boat should be fun, easy, and safe to sail. You want to learn to like -- no, love! -- sailing. So the boat needs to be fun. Far, far too few "cruising" boats, especially the heavy "offshore cruisers," are fun to sail.

Sailing can be fun. It can also be boring. It can be comfortable, but no matter what kind of boat, it will sometimes be uncomfortable. Very uncomfortable.

Many people lose their tolerance for cruising because of even a few days of the extreme discomfort that does occur. If you are not getting A LOT of pleasure from sailing a LOT of the time, you may decide to do something else before long.

Now, like heroin or alcohol, once you get hooked, you will put up with anything. And sailing certainly has me hooked as much as any junky.
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Old 14-03-2014, 17:05   #51
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

I would personally stay away from any Benns and Jennes....very beamy to length ration and nice for a bareboat charter or coastal cruising but not extended passage making (unless they are improved which is also possible but costly)...one thing about 70/80s boats is that the build is a lot stronger than any of the 90/00....think old cars vs new ones...new ones have all the luxury but if you hit anything with it, you're up for a lot of damage...for the kind of cruising you are thinking of I would suggest you look at design first (personal best choice cruising or long keel with good rudder protection..full keel is great for the high seas too)...then look at what you really need equipment wise...remember everything that may break down will need to be repaired so think comfort first then a manual less comfortable backup...length I would say is spot on, anything 38-42 range for a couple is comfortable...I did my trips on a 34 footer and she was a tad small...having sailed on friends 38 and 40 footers, it was a massive difference...do look at Roberts yachts, there are quite a few that have been pro built (as opposed to backyard jobs) sparkman stephens is another one that I have sailed on and she's a great boat (a 38 footer from memory)...and most important make a list of requirements, and stick to it...just like buying a house...dont get swayed by the fancy work or luxury items sacrificing safety and comfort at sea
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Old 17-03-2014, 14:38   #52
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

It makes sense that in some areas of manufacturing, certain trends in regards to material quality and/or technique. I honestly appreciate the words of advice especially when names/years/models are included!
It looks like August will be the month of purchasing as I will await the return of my deployed gentleman. In the mean time, the little rental boats at the marina will give me the sailing practice I so need!

Cheers!
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Old 17-03-2014, 15:08   #53
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

You will find advice for and against any type of boat here on this forum. In my experience the most common type of cruiser we have seen out there is the very Bene's and Jenne's Waltzingmatilda says to avoid!
IMO long keel boats are old fashioned and slow. You may like that, and that's fine. They can be safe and comfortable. Not all are.
Modern production boats in good order are VERY strong. Much, much stronger than most give them credit for. The performance ranges (Bene Firsts, for example) are very good performers as well. Performance can mean fun, greater cruising range in a fixed time, or being too light and having too much movement, depending on the personal views of the person describing them.
Personally I prefer the lighter, faster boats. But that's just me. Pick an example of what you like. Look online to see if similar boats have done the type of sailing you want to do. Speak with owners if poss, but remember everyone is biased towards their own boats! Do a thorough inspection of the boat yourself, checking obvious stuff, incl cleanliness - this is an indicator of the way the owner has looked after her - dry bilges, keel bolts, engine mounts, mast step, signs of movement in bulkheads, etc etc. Then, if you are happy, get a good survey before purchase. And the best of luck selecting her!
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Old 17-03-2014, 19:24   #54
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waltzingmatilda View Post
I would personally stay away from any Benns and Jennes....very beamy to length ration and nice for a bareboat charter or coastal cruising but not extended passage making (unless they are improved which is also possible but costly)...one thing about 70/80s boats is that the build is a lot stronger than any of the 90/00....think old cars vs new ones...new ones have all the luxury but if you hit anything with it, you're up for a lot of damage...for the kind of cruising you are thinking of I would suggest you look at design first (personal best choice cruising or long keel with good rudder protection..full keel is great for the high seas too)...then look at what you really need equipment wise...remember everything that may break down will need to be repaired so think comfort first then a manual less comfortable backup...length I would say is spot on, anything 38-42 range for a couple is comfortable...I did my trips on a 34 footer and she was a tad small...having sailed on friends 38 and 40 footers, it was a massive difference...do look at Roberts yachts, there are quite a few that have been pro built (as opposed to backyard jobs) sparkman stephens is another one that I have sailed on and she's a great boat (a 38 footer from memory)...and most important make a list of requirements, and stick to it...just like buying a house...dont get swayed by the fancy work or luxury items sacrificing safety and comfort at sea

I'd ignore every sentence of that post IMHO.

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Old 18-03-2014, 10:32   #55
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

I haven't read all the posts on this thread so my apologies if I am repeating something. A very good resource (I use all the time) is bluewater.org. It gives background and other great info for a variety of "proven" offshore boats and designs. You may not find your dream boat here but if a boat you are looking at is on here, you might find some very useful info on the good, bad, indifferent of various builds. Especially useful is the info on the weaknesses or historical problems with some models. It is NOT exhaustive and you should not avoid a boat just because it is not on here. The boats on here are in general the "classic plastic" types that have significant history offshore. We bought a Whitby 42 and got a good feel for how the boat would be, the historical issues with this model, etc. E.g., Whitby's have had problems with leading water tanks and they are very difficult to fix. Also they are not great sailers. But we bought one anyway and it was great as a live aboard for us. But I would not buy one again.

BTW - we started out as sailing newbies on a 42' boat. We had the luxury of sailing a few years in the protected waters of Puget Sound so we didn't have to worry about some of the things you would have to learning off the coast of California. You will have a major learning curve ahead. IMHO - go with a proven offshore boat and not a lightly built cheaper boat, e.g. a Hunter. The Westsail 32's are safe and strong but kind of slow. The blue water.org site has a good background on it. You can find good smaller, faster boats that are every bit as safe when you know a bit of what you are doing. You should consider some sailing classes out on the ocean or at least some trips out on friends' boats. Don't underestimate the power of the ocean and weather. They have a knack for humbling you, and showing how much you need to know. And - going north past Oregon and Washington is advanced sailing by any definition of the phrase. Far easier going south to Mexico.
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Old 30-03-2014, 19:15   #56
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

Ted brewer, cabo ricos, mayflower are good for.livesboard blue water cruisers

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Old 21-04-2014, 02:20   #57
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

We love our Beneteau 46 and plan to do some blue water sailing this summer. Great boat, we have sailed BC down to Seattle. Handles very well also a very comfortable, stable liveaboard.
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Old 21-04-2014, 02:49   #58
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

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I'd ignore every sentence of that post IMHO.

Dave


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agree with Dave -- we sail a jeanneau and she is a great boat and in our atlantic crossing she really wanted to run - she can take a lot more than the crew can - comfortable fast and easy to handle -
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Old 21-04-2014, 02:51   #59
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

..

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Old 21-04-2014, 02:56   #60
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Re: Selling it all for a bluewater boat - Advice requested :)

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Originally Posted by exMaggieDrum View Post
I haven't read all the posts on this thread so my apologies if I am repeating something. A very good resource (I use all the time) is bluewater.org. It gives background and other great info for a variety of "proven" offshore boats and designs. You may not find your dream boat here but if a boat you are looking at is on here, you might find some

.
i clicked on your site maggie and it is eastern michigan? did i miss something? i put in my boat and nothing came up. now i am anything but a techie so i may have done something wrong
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