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Old 23-02-2012, 16:31   #46
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

Most of my guests that need instruction are non boaters. My boater friends know what to bring and how to use the head. With non boaters, I do tell them before hand about foot wear and space limitations, beverage and food included. I have the head talk with each non boater and usually have a review session before use. I tell them to ask if they need help before they use the head. I have not yet had a problem with this approach.
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Old 23-02-2012, 21:07   #47
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This thread was an interesting read, but I do think there needs to be a place for the rules and etiquette of visitors at a MARINA!

Oh my, the troubles we have with dock walkers who don't realize (or don't care) that they're on private property is unbelievable.

Either way, certainly an interesting thread!
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Old 23-02-2012, 21:14   #48
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

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Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
It's the fridge full of beer...

Always an important factor, whether you've got collegians or forum moderators aboard.

Or so I've noticed.
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Old 23-02-2012, 21:50   #49
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

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Originally Posted by Charon View Post
Good post. I mostly live on a yacht in Bundaberg and work as Medic on a survey boat on the (Ozzie) west coast and can share your concern. People will do things on a boat that they would never do visiting someone's house. Funny that.

On our commercial survey boat, we have very well articulated expectations covering everything, including codes of behaviour, safety, man overboard, dining arrangements, responsibilities and schedules. We have regular meetings and a very formal safety code. But it is also relaxed (as we do 24 hour operations) and people can enjoy time off in comfort and relative privacy.

This works because it is spelt out clearly at the outset - I think that is the key. The document could be a skippers checklist (one page, dotpoint, laminated) or a prescriptive list. Perhaps even a video, as we have on our survey vessel.

In my "Welcome Aboard" list I would have:

1. Pre Voyage:
Clothing, footwear and sun protection
Personal gear and contributions to the galley
Personal Safety Gear
Medical and food requirements/medications and allergies

2. On Boarding:
Using the marine head
Personal space and stowage of gear
Keeping a tidy ship
Fire extinguishers - location and use, fire blanket
Lifejackets and grab bags
Liferaft deployment
Flares, Epirb, radios and flares, other safety equipment
"One hand for yourself" and moving around the vessel
Helping out - your contributing to a working ship/yacht and morale
Illicit drugs and alcohol

3. On Voyage:
Watchkeeping arrangements, sleep and consideration for the off watch
Man Overboard
Distractions on the bridge/helm - collision avoidance and keeping a lookout
Arrangements for meals and snacks
Environmental considerations - what can be thrown overboard (if anything)

The previous post is also spot on - as our ship's medic - that is a mater of course. Nobody objects. Also with dietary requirements, allergies etc.

I would like to see some more draft "Welcome Aboard" items too. Like in an aircraft. Laminated. Might then make up my own list.

Richard of Charon

For MY part, given that I live on my boat, I clear off a section of shelving for each person so they can keep some things out and not always have to dig through their duffel bag to find things like medication, have a place to put their watch at night, etc. All my shelf sections have either sliding doors or fabric snap panels so stuff doesn't go flying when we heel.

I REQUIRE closed toed boat shoes, and I require no drinking until the day's sailing is done and we're anchored or docked.
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Old 24-02-2012, 07:59   #50
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

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Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
The best answer


Having a boat with guest space is just like owning a ski chalet or a beach house -- it is a tremendous amenity to your friends (you will suddenly have more) and relatives (some of whom will crawl out of the woodwork).

And if that's not what you wanted in the first place -- you should have bought a Contessa

Freeloading? That's what guests do. That's the definition of a guest. So if you don't want your friends freeloading, then don't invite them. Hospitality means giving people the chance to freeload. If it gives you pleasure, do it. If not, don't.

I intentionally bought a boat with lots of guest space (sleeps seven not counting the salon, I have not infrequently ended up the one sleeping on the settee in the salon because all seven other beds were occupied -- I have lots of friends ).

Of course it is a big financial strain to have a month or six-week long cruise with the boat full of guests all the time, so I am always pleased, and always gratefully accept when my guests chip in for marina fees, meals in town, provisions, fuel. If I'm personally concentrated on running the boat, I am always glad when guests entirely relieve me of the cooking and washing dishes, especially when the guests are not helping much with the sailing. I, personally, would never, ever demand any of this, make up some formula for it, or even discuss it -- well brought-up folk do it naturally. If you're not pleased with some guest's willingness to contribute, just don't invite them next time. Simples.

When I am a guest on someone else's boat, I always buy all the provisions and booze, pay all the restaurant bills, and make damn sure to do my share of the dirty jobs on board -- carrying off garbage, helming when the autopilot is on the fritz, flaking and covering the mainsail, washing dishes, fixing things (other boat owners are more grateful for this last point than anything else you can do, in my experience). Is it rocket science? My mom taught me the principles of this when I was about six years old, I don't know about the rest of you.
Seems to me you have the right attitude. I love to have Guests on the Yacht and sometimes I love to see them leave, took me awhile to figure that out now Life is easy ----------Cheers
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Old 24-02-2012, 08:49   #51
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

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If you have to provide family and friends with checklists to enlighten them as to how to behave then you either have a crap set of family and friends or you dont have the art of verbal communication sussed.

Just tell them.
That about sums it up.
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Old 24-02-2012, 08:51   #52
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

Sharing costs is called chartering. It worked for Don Street, Tristan Jones, many others. Hospitality calls for reciprocation, maybe, but not a contribution. Could you get these guests to host you to a great meal on shore?
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Old 24-02-2012, 10:06   #53
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

I do not like it when guests pays the bills. The provokes obligations. If I invite people I am very well capable of feeding them and have sufficient drinks to survive the nights. If they invite me for the occasional dinner, ok. Next to that, let me be the conductor please.
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Old 27-04-2012, 09:42   #54
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

After ten years and more than 80 guests, crew and family, I have a 8 page summation of what I expect.

At the beginning, I did not have such a set of protocols, but about the third time I was told, "you never told me that" I started keeping a list of such events. Juno's protocols evolved from that list, and include what behavior I expect on topics like watchstanding, safety, cleanliness, head use, tidiness (or as I put it, living in your own space) and etiquette ( it always amazes me that some folks need to be reminded that my boat is my home and that standing on the salon cushions is not acceptable, nor is lounging on said upholstery without a shirt irksome to those who have to clean sweat stains and sunscreen)

This set of protocols is given to everyone, ( fellow seamen who have circumnavigated, family members and the complete stranger who is a novice) if they are on board for more than a day trip, they read the protocols or at least tell me they have read them! Not one person has complained about me providing such a list. However, a few have complained about some of the protocals, if they did not accept my explanations, I politely suggest they find a boat that will meet their expectations.

Any person who comes on Juno for more than a daysail is expected to pay a per diem, with two exceptions. If it is a day sail, they bring food and drink for themselves and the skipper. The other exception is one reserved for us skippers operating solo, if I invite a lady to be a guest as a date, she does not have to contribute for the first week. Should the date develop beyond merely a casual adventure, and a longer, more permanent relationship is desired, the subject of contributions towards the operation of Juno is discussed. (Realistically, don't most people have such a discussion with someone with whom they plan sharing an residence?)

Each of us can manage these things as they wish, but this system has worked very well for me over the past 8 years.

Cheers

Tom
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Old 27-04-2012, 09:56   #55
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

We never ask for sharing of expenses.

No guests prone to sea sickness.

I do insist on guest smoking on deck, and not using a beer can for an ash tray.
When or if the can tips and the nasty tobacco juice spills, it's a brutal smell ya can't get rid of.

No Tampons in the head toilet. They jam the maceration.
They must understand the operation of the toilet and stress how important following instruction is.

Friend is a chef for Club Med and he'll cook for us, a few hot looking girls we know are bartenders/cocktail waitress' and they'll guest bartend for us.

Spray on tanning stains the upholstery worse than anything. Absolutely forbidden.

No flashing in American waters, no girls under 18 unless an adult female is along, no drugs,, 21 to drink. All this as a result of past experiences.

Everyone understands launching of the dingy and the ditch bag and vests.
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Old 27-04-2012, 13:00   #56
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

I recently took out my first two "guests" and ran through a short list of do's and don'ts. Only thing I left out for this one-nighter, was use of toilet paper and would you believe, in one evening and by nine the next morning, the head was clogged. sheesh! That oversight won't ever happen again.
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Old 27-04-2012, 13:15   #57
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Hildebrandt View Post
After ten years and more than 80 guests, crew and family, I have a 8 page summation of what I expect.

At the beginning, I did not have such a set of protocols, but about the third time I was told, "you never told me that" I started keeping a list of such events. ......................

.......................
Each of us can manage these things as they wish, but this system has worked very well for me over the past 8 years.

Cheers

Tom
Any chance of sharing that list?
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Old 27-04-2012, 13:15   #58
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

there is a fine line between chartering and sharing the sail. make sure NO money changes hands. keep all receipts. smooth sailing.
you break it or clog it--you fix it... works for me.
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Old 27-04-2012, 13:25   #59
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

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Any chance of sharing that list?
Yeah, I'm collecting lists at the moment .
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Old 27-04-2012, 13:38   #60
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re: Rules & Etiquette for Visitors Aboard Your Boat

Yes, mee too, list please?
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