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Old 24-07-2014, 19:25   #31
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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When I was young my dad told me, "Go get a trade. Tradesmen never starve and at least you will know what you are unemployed from." I did 2 years in JC to get my aircraft mechanics license. and never looked back on what I thought I wanted to be (lawyer...) - 15 years or so in I jumped to management and now I manage 35 field engineers.

I divide the disciplines into mechanical, craftsmanship & labor.

Engines, electric, plumbing etc. are mechanical This stuff is pretty easy to learn and you can take a lifetime improving your skills.

Craftsmanship - Painting, woodworking, cabinetry, fiberglass work. This stuff is also not hard but requires great skill to make it look awesome. I am pretty basic when it comes to craftsmanship. I get a decent job done but not beauty queens

Labor - As pointed out - this is the bottom rung and usually involves a lot of sanding and grunt work.

You can get stuck on the bottom rung. Get the skill, use your first boatyard to pay real close attention to what's going on. When your work is done help on the mechanical side, without getting in the way.

If you don't see the next step up the ladder emerging you may have to move on.

As to what skill to learn? Do time at each of them. You may find a niche you love.

Just an aside on Sailmakers and riggers. I have worked with a limited few of both and have observed many. A sailmaker can be a seamstress, building a sail to plan. A great sailmaker is a successful sailor and has the practical knowledge to make better sails. My sail was designed and built by a professional racer. He was able to guide me somewhat. Same with riggers.

Point being if you want to be at the "top" of either of these skills I think some years sailing boats fast is important.
+1 Ex CA
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Old 24-07-2014, 19:28   #32
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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at 300lbs,your first priority might be losing some weight!
not sure they build boats with hatches big enough to accomodate overweight individuals!

I have to agree. If you encounter a problem cruising you need to be able to get into tight spaces. I have had to slim down and definitely recommend it. Not something you may want to hear but it is the truth.
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Old 25-07-2014, 01:16   #33
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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................... Hudson Force,
Thank you for the response and not answering but still being incredibly informative! My only question regarding your response is why a sloop or cutter rig? ....................
The sloop or cutter advise came with the best rig for a 28' to 34' boat, but in these times, with the techniques of handling large sails mechanically, it's often the choice for larger boats too. Now, I must admit that I favor my ketch rig on my 41'. I do like some of the flexibility with sail combinations, but my only real advantage is bridge clearances. My performance would be better with the sloop or cutter. ...... but then I had my 30' performance boat in the 70's. I have my comfortable slow ketch for my preferences now.

'looks like I still can't present a clear answer, but then I'm usually suspicious of those that claim a clear answer!
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Old 25-07-2014, 08:49   #34
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

The most valid argument I know of for a split rig is ease of sail handling. The up wind performance on a sloop rig is unquestionably better but a cutter or ketch rig mean smaller sails, less work to reef, more alternatives depending on wind and sea conditions and ability to have a more comfortable sailing vessel.
I've had all of them and these are the main things I recall as positives. Certainly, you give up a bit on speed and performance but all in all, I preferred the ketch to all of the different rigs I've sailed. A delivery of a 75 foot schooner was also a memorable experience although the light airs we experienced didn't allow much of a test... more motoring than sailing!
Single handing, which it sounds like you may be into for a while, requires that you think through this decision but my advice is to try and get experience on all types of boats before buying. You will find that many, if not most, of the 28-35 foot range will be sloop or cutter rigged and give you a feel for their performance as well as what is required agility-wise to sail one efficiently.
I encourage you to follow your dreams and join a vibrant and fun life style... cheers, Phil
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Old 25-07-2014, 10:22   #35
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

Some pretty disappointing comments offered here. When I read the OP intro, I don't think I heard him say, "Can anyone tell me how to lose some weight?'. I can hear a young guy, with an experience that triggered a desire. The desire to find a way of life that is more rewarding than the prescribed nightmare called success offered in the current cultural vacuum. Is he a dreamer? Certainly! Its not like anyone here is any different. If your living on a boat for 'practical' reasons, your idiot. It's about the dream. Does he know what he's talking about. No. But he will in time. If he just made a trip up the ICW in a 26'' Magregor, he knows a lot about how he fit's in such a boat. That's why he's interested in a 30+ footer. He'll learn as we all do, by hard won experience. Not by some blowhard, offering up the obvious. And trying to be 'tactful', is just more BS. Tact from the musical root, tacet, doesn't mean being nice, it means being silent. I like the get a trade idea. Air conditioning in Fl. is always in demand. The guys been to my house three times this year. Boat systems are fundamentally the same. Different power sources and scale. Diesel mechanic is most in demand while living aboard. We sailed for 15 years and the thing that broke most often was the power plant. There is allways someone in the anchorage or marina up **** creek with the engine. $$$$ There are a thousand boats within driving distance on the east coast that are selling for giveaway prices. Get 5 to 10k together and buy one. In a year or two you'll know more of what is needed. What works and what does not. You'll also learn that there are many, many folks out there who will see only the obvious flaw in your endeavors. Learn to tune them out. Look for encouragement and kindness. And most of all, information. All of the commentators here are good folks. Some, need to engage the mind before the fingers start tapping away. Trade school, on the job experience, saving money, get a boat, choke down some humble pie, enjoy. And, I have dropped 60 lbs over the past few years by going to a program called 'Food addicts in recovery'. Obesity in these time is not a failing, it's a disorder foisted on us by the food industry. Those who don't have it will think not, those who do will know better. Check it out.
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Old 25-07-2014, 10:49   #36
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

Here's a good start.

Sailboat **MUST SELL** new price
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Old 25-07-2014, 17:55   #37
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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And, I have dropped 60 lbs over the past few years by going to a program called 'Food addicts in recovery'. Obesity in these time is not a failing, it's a disorder foisted on us by the food industry. Those who don't have it will think not, those who do will know better. Check it out.
Congratulations on the weight loss program. Why wouldn't you encourage OP to do the same?

Also I agreed with everything you said up to the blame the food industry part.

Victim mentality.
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Old 25-07-2014, 20:35   #38
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

When I say, "check it out", that is the encouragement, in the form of an invitation. My way of thinking is to offer my experience, not my advise. He knows what his needs are, he may not know the reason for the weight issue , but if he should, "check it out" he will find out. Thanks for the agreement. As to the industrialization of the western diet, it seems like it should be a good thing, when in fact it is killing us in pandemic proportions. There isn't a good Doc alive who will not concede that far too many of our fatal illness's are due in large part to industrialization of our food. The American Cancer Assoc states that the illness is a consequence of our diet and life style. We are being fed material, you can't call it food, that is void of anything close to nutrition. Compounded by the addition of substances that are known carcinogens and toxins. Add to that the science that informs the manufacturer that all simple sugary foods will inevitably lead to addiction. It is the biological nature of the beast to eat all of the blueberries on the bush because they tend to be scarce, in the natural world. But in Wally World, well, there's a never ending supply! Sorry to be long winded here, but it may be the only way you may ever hear this point of view. Your sure as hell will never hear it via the industrialized communication source's. Also, I don't speak Victimese. Blame and causation are very different from one another.
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Old 25-07-2014, 22:30   #39
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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at 300lbs,your first priority might be losing some weight!
not sure they build boats with hatches big enough to accomodate overweight individuals!
Come on guys, he didn't say "if I was 6 inches taller I'd be perfectly round" did he?
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Old 25-07-2014, 23:26   #40
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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Come on guys, he didn't say "if I was 6 inches taller I'd be perfectly round" did he?
No, however if anyone had a spare compressor and a rubber suit, I could be.
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Old 25-07-2014, 23:29   #41
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

A good entry point into this would be to set up your own Sanding/polishing/ Antifouling business near a yacht club.
Set up costs and not that high and you will learn plenty about boats, keep fit and after a few years can move on if it not what you enjoy. Big thing is to learn how and to do it properly and professionally and people will pay decent money for a good job.
Boats are not cheap things to either buy or maintain so part time jobs and sailing around the world is perhaps a bit of a fantasy until you can get that solid base behind you first. Head down and hard work is the only way you will achieve your dream unless you have financial backing behind you. Good luck with it all
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Old 26-07-2014, 04:07   #42
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

Look OP brought up the weight issue himself in his first post.

He also said he can't work in cramped spaces.

He also said he wants to live aboard and work in the yachting industry.

It is perfectly legitimate to point out the limitations of his plan.

This isn't AYSO soccer where everyone get a "participant" trophy. This is life with real consequence and limitations. If it is a tough message to hear then too bad. Life's tough get a helmet.

BTW - No one attacked OP. They just pointed out how hard it will be to do what he wants if his BMI is 35+.

Peace out...
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Old 26-07-2014, 06:35   #43
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

It seems obvious, but I'll join the parade. Some qualities that will deterrmine your success in achieving your goals will be, .... health (weight/size), money, experience, motivation, intelligence and maybe a little luck as well!
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