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Old 24-07-2014, 10:24   #16
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

even at 6'10,300lbs is off the scale obese!

http://www.graceandstrengthdiet.com/...oes-it-matter/
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Old 24-07-2014, 11:02   #17
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

As a short obese person, I must say that having any more girth than I do would make it difficult to use the head on most <40 sailboats.

I do fit through our forward hatch with room to spare, but I don't fit in the lazarette or back in the stern to work on steering as well as my husband. That is more than OK by me, as he says they are miserable places to be, but If you are alone, you need to be able to fit in all the places.

Flexibility and balance seem to be the most important factors. I have yet to find anything strength wise that I can't handle. I am too short to see what I am doing when zipping up the stack pack, though.


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Old 24-07-2014, 11:33   #18
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

That is too much mate, try to loose some weight. Good luck on your plans.
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Old 24-07-2014, 11:36   #19
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

i have found most all boat-heads small and because my job would be to fix it when they bust i would simply use a "biodegradable paperbag" and toss it out the head porthole while underway.never had one other crew member even notice till a seabird swooped down and picked it up off the stern. guess those birds will eat anything.saved alot of wear and tear i figured but doubt it goes over well in most harbours or marinas. fairwinds
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Old 24-07-2014, 11:48   #20
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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i have found most all boat-heads small and because my job would be to fix it when they bust i would simply use a "biodegradable paperbag" and toss it out the head porthole while underway.never had one other crew member even notice till a seabird swooped down and picked it up off the stern. guess those birds will eat anything.saved alot of wear and tear i figured but doubt it goes over well in most harbours or marinas. fairwinds
gee, thanks for sharing that
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Old 24-07-2014, 11:53   #21
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

hey ,no problemo, just some advice for those who dont like fixing or paying to fix heads. also a easy solution for those that find it uncomfortable especially while underway. sure i aint the only one doing it.fairwinds
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Old 24-07-2014, 14:30   #22
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

My, my, I've got a lot to respond to here. First I'll say; yes, I need to lose the weight for both my health and my interests and the fact that I vaguely thought I could get by without it I was a fool of. So for now I'll start from the top and work my way down.


atoll,

You're right without a doubt as I've mentioned. Already cutting out the things this morning that I don't, nor never have, needed to get by on the daily. Thank you for putting it bluntly as possible, as it's true. I'm going to need to get some weights more suited toward building armstrength rather than toning it, which is all I've had.


boatman61,

It's not as if I'm physically inept during that period, and I imagine it's the same for some for their first time on a boat. There's a point where you're unused to the conditions that - while you may be short of breath and still coming to understand what's needed - you're doing the labor, you just feel unwell while doing it.

That sounds like a brutal hit, honestly. I've never broken a bone in my body upwards of 230 lbs when I was younger. I've dropped, I've been hit, I've gotten the hell beaten out of me by a couple of crane hooks that were dropped too far on the line, never broken a single thing no matter what I've been in. So there might just be two abnormalities here - him having a bone issue, or me having reasonably thick bones.

Either way, I hope he's doing better than before. Something like that can be lifechanging if it goes terribly wrong and doesn't set.


Hudson Force,

Thank you for the response and not answering but still being incredibly informative! My only question regarding your response is why a sloop or cutter rig?


Ex-Calif,

That's a whole lotta post my friend, thank you! Looking up those books now and have already opened up a new tab searching for SailorChic's posts. Also I've never borrowed in my life, especially not considering it now with what I'm aiming to do. Would be counter productive, certainly.

But back onto the point of 'becoming an expert at boats,' what are some general skills and traits that would be favorable to learn? I'd imagine sail-making/repair, engine maintenence and repair (as you said) and on a smaller level some sort of carpentry? From upholtering interior, woodworking, a little plumbing as well. I'd imagine that having a little knowledge in all of these would be preferable, especially if I was sailing the coast for a year or two.

Would be nice to settle some trades. Patching their sail or interior up for some food or gas.


a64pilot,

Actually, I have been considering schooling of some sort that would put me into a decent position to fall back on when things go awry and to build up with when the time requires me to be ashore. The very last thing I'd rather be is realizing my goals are just out of reach and I might never see them come to fruition.

And cornfed I may not be, but I'm not a bowling ball either. And the weight isn't going to be staying long, now. Thank you extremely for your input.


valhalla360,

No, I believe their concerns are well met. But that ladder was definitely a good thing to have.





In closing, thanks all very much for the replies and I'll be back later to see what else there is to answer/question! Again, thank you all!
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Old 24-07-2014, 15:24   #23
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

sorry to be blunt,and please dont take my comment as being mean it was not meant in that way.

sailing is a great way to keep fit ,but there will be no gain without pain!

i reccomend starting off the day with a bit of exercise,and ending it with some!
a brisk 15 minute walk morning and evening will work wonders for your health.
as will cutting out sugar and fat from your diet.

owning a boat wether it be on a mooring or on the dock will also lead to great improvement to fitness and weight loss,as the act of just walking up and down the dock,or rowing out to the mooring provides great cardio.

couple that with being up and down from inside,on and off the boat half a dozen times a day,tropical heat and you will feel healthier,be healthier and the weight will soon melt off.

the world is your oyster,but only you can make the changes,best of luck
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Old 24-07-2014, 15:36   #24
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

G'Day HOurstone,

If you spend some time around boatyards you will see the kind of jobs that the younger guys get stuck on, and they for the most part don't require too much training! A common task is sanding, scraping and otherwise cleaning up boat bottoms in preparation for antifouling paint or blister remediation. The work is physically demanding and beset with toxic substances, so most places you will be wearing an impermeable Tyvex hooded "bunny suit". In hot weather, this is really taxing and not fun at all. Actually, it isn't fun in any sort of weather! But, someone has to do it, and it's usually the new kid in the yard. So, that is one prospect -- not fun, but you will learn by being around skilled shipwrights doing interesting jobs on boats. Another job relegated to newbies is helping the lift or slipway operator get boats in and out of the water. This involves lots of "push and shove" type of labour, climbing up and down scaffolding and cradles and generally busting your butt dealing with big and heavy lumps of boat.

How can you avoid this sort of drudgery? Well, learning a specific trade that is applicable to sailing might be appealing. Something like rigging or sailmaking (no work in enclosed spaces) might fit, and to me is interesting technically and intellectually. Once you have become better acquainted with the yachting workplace, an apprenticeship might be possible. Or if not a formal apprenticeship, wangling an entry level job with a rigger or sailmaker might work out... but this is the kind of thing that you get into by word of mouth and familiarity with a local scene. The old boy network kind of thing...

As in all human interactions, being friendly, showing interest in what others are doing and working your butt off without being asked will get you a long way towards your goal. Good luck with it, and let us know how you get on.

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Old 24-07-2014, 18:18   #25
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

Im in lil egg harbor just south of LBI planning on going to Flordia in Nov. if u want to get in contact with a local that might need a mate for the trip contact me. I have a D37 cutter I'm 250 n have no prob lol

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Old 24-07-2014, 18:42   #26
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

Good luck with your chosen adventure, Hourstone... Atoll has a habit of frankness but over the years I've seen him to be knowledgeable and well intentioned. Just getting aboard and living for a few months in that environment will do wonders for your fitness and stamina. Living aboard isn't for the lazy or indolent. You need to take extraordinary precautions as has been stated to ensure you have a way to get back aboard when you fall overboard... not if, WHEN because it will happen. I don't care how much upper body strength you have, getting back aboard or even onto a dock can be challenging.
I would be looking for at least 30 feet LOD with standing headroom and a head big enough that you are comfortable in. Make certain your bunk has the requisite length for you to stretchout as well. Don't worry too much about refrigerating, ice will work fine for a year or two. With your size, you should be able to pick up work in the yards in Southern Florida and learn the ropes there while you build your sailing skills.
Good luck to you and fair winds... cheers, Phil
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Old 24-07-2014, 19:10   #27
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

atoll,

It's no problem at all! There's always a need for a blunt view. It reinforces reality and shakes the bounds for those that try and avoid it. Getting their head in place and them on the right track, like myself.


Jim Cate,

The last statement from previous leads me to you. As you said, it's a better idea to find a default trade to fall back on and learn from. As such I'm now in the market for a reliable, hands-on training experience and education from a reputable Technical School. (Certainly taking advice on what a good choice may be.)


Pelagir,

Long Beach Island's long been my family's favorite vacation spot, if I had the funds to make it to LBI and fly back from Florida I'd certainly love to.


Capt Phil,

Thanks for the ideas. Luckily I am a decent swimmer and float rather well considering my current weight, haha. Certainly have the mind for a drop ladder. Out of curiousity, do sellers often have issue with test sailing/potential buyers trying to lay down in the bunk areas?
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Old 24-07-2014, 19:20   #28
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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Originally Posted by Hourstone View Post
Ex-Calif,

That's a whole lotta post my friend, thank you! Looking up those books now and have already opened up a new tab searching for SailorChic's posts. Also I've never borrowed in my life, especially not considering it now with what I'm aiming to do. Would be counter productive, certainly.

But back onto the point of 'becoming an expert at boats,' what are some general skills and traits that would be favorable to learn? I'd imagine sail-making/repair, engine maintenence and repair (as you said) and on a smaller level some sort of carpentry? From upholtering interior, woodworking, a little plumbing as well. I'd imagine that having a little knowledge in all of these would be preferable, especially if I was sailing the coast for a year or two.

Would be nice to settle some trades. Patching their sail or interior up for some food or gas.

When I was young my dad told me, "Go get a trade. Tradesmen never starve and at least you will know what you are unemployed from." I did 2 years in JC to get my aircraft mechanics license. and never looked back on what I thought I wanted to be (lawyer...) - 15 years or so in I jumped to management and now I manage 35 field engineers.

I divide the disciplines into mechanical, craftsmanship & labor.

Engines, electric, plumbing etc. are mechanical This stuff is pretty easy to learn and you can take a lifetime improving your skills.

Craftsmanship - Painting, woodworking, cabinetry, fiberglass work. This stuff is also not hard but requires great skill to make it look awesome. I am pretty basic when it comes to craftsmanship. I get a decent job done but not beauty queens

Labor - As pointed out - this is the bottom rung and usually involves a lot of sanding and grunt work.

You can get stuck on the bottom rung. Get the skill, use your first boatyard to pay real close attention to what's going on. When your work is done help on the mechanical side, without getting in the way.

If you don't see the next step up the ladder emerging you may have to move on.

As to what skill to learn? Do time at each of them. You may find a niche you love.

Just an aside on Sailmakers and riggers. I have worked with a limited few of both and have observed many. A sailmaker can be a seamstress, building a sail to plan. A great sailmaker is a successful sailor and has the practical knowledge to make better sails. My sail was designed and built by a professional racer. He was able to guide me somewhat. Same with riggers.

Point being if you want to be at the "top" of either of these skills I think some years sailing boats fast is important.
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Old 24-07-2014, 19:21   #29
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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Originally Posted by Hourstone View Post
atoll,

It's no problem at all! There's always a need for a blunt view. It reinforces reality and shakes the bounds for those that try and avoid it. Getting their head in place and them on the right track, like myself.


Jim Cate,

The last statement from previous leads me to you. As you said, it's a better idea to find a default trade to fall back on and learn from. As such I'm now in the market for a reliable, hands-on training experience and education from a reputable Technical School. (Certainly taking advice on what a good choice may be.)


Pelagir,

Long Beach Island's long been my family's favorite vacation spot, if I had the funds to make it to LBI and fly back from Florida I'd certainly love to.


Capt Phil,

Thanks for the ideas. Luckily I am a decent swimmer and float rather well considering my current weight, haha. Certainly have the mind for a drop ladder. Out of curiousity, do sellers often have issue with test sailing/potential buyers trying to lay down in the bunk areas?
You're welcome, Hourstone... I don't care how good a swimmer/floater you are, make certain you can get out of the drink once you are in it! Try the ladder out before you need it to make sure you are comfortable using it or whatever method you have settled on. If a seller has a problem with you trying out a bunk, it isn't the boat for you. Any seller in his right mind would recognize that trying our every system and feature on his/her vessel is what an interested, informed buyer will demand. I once had an owner complain when I asked to red line the engine RPM's on a sea trial. I explained if he was uncomfortable with that, then I felt he was hiding something and probably alot of other things as well. He relented, engines ran fine for about a minute with no smoke and I ended up buying the boat. I would have walked if had refuses my request. Phil
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Old 24-07-2014, 19:25   #30
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Re: Questions of the Curious: Living Aboard and Abroad.

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I once had an owner complain when I asked to red line the engine RPM's on a sea trial. I explained if he was uncomfortable with that, then I felt he was hiding something and probably alot of other things as well. He relented, engines ran fine for about a minute with no smoke and I ended up buying the boat. I would have walked if had refuses my request. Phil
Not only that I specified how long the seatrial would be. We sailed for at least an hour and motor-sailed at "cruise" speed for an hour while we exercised everything on the boat.

You can't figure this out with a trip around the block.
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