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Old 11-12-2016, 10:21   #31
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

We have a large styrofoam box that we use to carry cool suff to the boat. It can be used as well to keep kettles hot.
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Old 11-12-2016, 10:25   #32
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

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Originally Posted by dmksails View Post
Sea Dreamer - I'm not following how removing the cooker and wrapping it in a blanket works - can you do this for all recipes or just for certain ones. For instance, I looked up a pot roast recipe. It says to bring the cooker to high pressure over medium heat, then once pressure is reached, reduce the heat enough to maintain pressure. Cook this way for 1 hours


So, would I remove it from heat when it reached pressure, wrap in blanket and it would still cook? Would it be ready in an hour, or would I need to wait longer?
I have not had to do the slow heat to maintain pressure. Myself I light stove bring pot roast to pressure and turn the stove off. When the pressure is completely off after adding the potatoes and carrots, i repeat the heat to pressure and turn off stove. When the pressure is again off I open the cooker and enjoy a perfectly cooked roast and vegies. ( allow pot to come off pressure sitting on stove )
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Old 11-12-2016, 10:51   #33
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

We have two Kuhn Rikon pressure cookers - both bought late in 1997. One is 8 litres and the other is the fry pan version. Both are used extensively and the kids are interchangeable. We purchased spare PRV and gaskets when we bought but to date have only changed the gaskets once in each - & then only as a precaution. We swear by them. We also have different inserts for them including the 3x compartment steamer basket which is used extensively. Now the family is thinning out the 5 litre version would likely be adequate alongside the 'fry pan'.
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Old 11-12-2016, 10:57   #34
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

I think I need to find some pressure cooker recipes on the search. Any recommended website or links for the recipes as there are too many on the search results.

Regarding the wonderbag, I like the idea but its size is not appropriate for the boat.
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Old 11-12-2016, 11:05   #35
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

Here is a good start for first timers pressure cooking
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...FC8zbcvITLZ7EA
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Old 11-12-2016, 11:06   #36
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmksails View Post
Sea Dreamer - I'm not following how removing the cooker and wrapping it in a blanket works - can you do this for all recipes or just for certain ones. For instance, I looked up a pot roast recipe. It says to bring the cooker to high pressure over medium heat, then once pressure is reached, reduce the heat enough to maintain pressure. Cook this way for 1 hours


So, would I remove it from heat when it reached pressure, wrap in blanket and it would still cook? Would it be ready in an hour, or would I need to wait longer?
In this instance one does not use pressure so use a slow cooker recipe instead. Just heat your food until very hot, pull it off the stove and wrap in insulation. The food will keep cooking for hours. Just like a slow cooker without spending fuel or big bucks for a thermal pot.
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Old 11-12-2016, 11:24   #37
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

I intend to have both on my boat. The pressure cooker cooks a meal quickly and the wonder bag will babysit itself during the day and dinner will be ready to eat when I am. I can see the wonder bag being used when you want something to slow cook all day. You can start it in the morning and then go swimming or hiking or sail to another location and it will be done when you're ready to eat. I also think they will excel at different dishes, some things just need to be slow cooked. The wonder bag stores flat, so it's not going to take much space, the pressure cooker takes up space, but is worth it, IMHO.
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Old 11-12-2016, 11:25   #38
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Thumbs up Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

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Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
These guys have been around as long as me.. longer actually..
https://www.prestige.co.uk/pressure-cookers.html
I have used pressure cookers on board successfully for over 30 years on gas stoves.
Invalueable!
Start and reduce heat when pressure is reached within a few minutes, and then wait for a short, recipe dependent, time without having to watch the pot. Perfect in difficult galley working conditions.

With specifications similar to Pressure Cookers | Electric Pressure Cookers, Stainless Steel Pressure Cookers and a spares' set (pressure relief valve, lid seal) they are perfect for cooking in a wave tossed boat.
The spares set will not be needed, but useful to have if offshore.
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Old 11-12-2016, 11:26   #39
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

Another way to slow cook is to find a 3L large mouth quality thermos bottle and still wrap it in blankets (but not the Thermos brand, they suck at keeping anything at proper temps). The large mouth is needed basically for cleaning, otherwise a regular size mouth would do. Japanese and German models are the best, although lately they started to make them in other places and the quality, i.e. temp. keeping ability, had become spotty.

My personal record for ice cubes in such a quality thermos wrapped in blankets was almost 4 days, with very little water thawing. Just pre-chill insides first with some throw away shaved ice and after filing with ice cubes don't open it at all until a few days later. And you'll have perfect ice cubes for your favorite adult beverage. I used this system on all my fridge-less boats (4 out of 5).

PS Thermos brand will not hold temp for more than half a day, if that, blanket or no blanket.
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Old 11-12-2016, 11:58   #40
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

Any modern pressure cooker is safe. Just follow directions
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Old 11-12-2016, 12:19   #41
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

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Originally Posted by pcmm View Post
gotta ask, what does running an inverter and genset have to do with a pressure cooker? they rtun off the stove. so its just a bit of propane.
We have an electric "multi-cooker" which we use a lot as either a pressure cooker or a slow cooker.
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Old 11-12-2016, 12:22   #42
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

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Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
These guys have been around as long as me.. longer actually..
https://www.prestige.co.uk/pressure-cookers.html
My folks bought a big aluminium Prestige back in the mid 50's and it was used almost daily for at least 30 years to my knowledge.
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Old 11-12-2016, 12:24   #43
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

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I am thinking of getting a pressure cooker for cooking on the boat, but I am not sure which brand is safe and good quality. I definitely don't want to have any explosion accidentally on the boat. Honestly, I have never used it before in my life and thought that it would be simple and efficient for cooking on the boat. Any recommended brand?

I am shocked to find the slow cooker without electricity (wonderbagworld) suggested by people on this forum. I was wondering if it could do the same job like pressure cooker apart from their big pumpkin bag.
Aden,

We have always had a pressure cooker [35+ years] and more recently, an insulated thermal cooker [4+ years.]

The pressure cooker has many ocean miles on it. They are great for saving fuel [when it isn't as available] shorten cooking times, allow the use of otherwise too tough to eat proteins, and greatly reduce moisture release into the boat [something important to those of us living aboard in cooler climates.] And the briefer cooking times reduce the amount of heat released for those in warmer climes... The locking lid is a great safety device- especially when cooking on a passage- whether used as a regular pot or pressure cooker...

When sizing a cooker, remember you only fill them 2/3rds full. We own a 4 qt and 2- 6 qt cookers. The 4 qt now lives in our camper as it isn't really big enough for some roasts, etc., and we like leftovers... We keep one 6 qt onboard these days, and recently upgraded our 25+ year old jiggle-top with a more modern Fagor with short handles. The 6qt models aren't really any larger in diameter, just a bit taller than the 4 qt cookers, and are just right for when we have guests and/or want leftovers...

[I should mention the main reason we replaced our old stainless steel cooker is it had two rivets on the inside for the handle assembly, and they were starting to erode to the point where I would soon not trust them to hold pressure...]

Regarding your question about pressure cooking books, I am a long time fan of Lorna Sass' books... Great recipes [as starting points] and a treasure trove of hints and techniques for pressure cookers.

The thermal cooker is also wonderful, and requires a bit more advance planning since cooking time can be anywhere from 3-8 hours depending upon the recipe. We also use it to make yoghurt, and subsequently yoghurt cheese from that. It is great for convening hot or cold products to other venues as well.

We use the Saratoga Jacks 5.5L two pot version. [They also make a 7L model...]

You can also get bread pan for it if you like traditionally shaped oblong loaves... Any of the quality vacuum insulated are also very good, albeit more expensive by twice or more...

There aren't too many thermal cookbooks out, but this one will get you started...

Best wishes deciding what is best for your needs, and Bon Appétit!

Cheers! Bill
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Old 11-12-2016, 13:52   #44
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

Go pressure cookers. I have been using various sizes (non electric) for 45 years. Very safe, very efficient, very adaptable to multi purpose. Seals last a very long time and are easy to replace. Mine have generally been "new" from charity gift shops. I find a large and a small together to be invaluable. They are not related but can nest nicely. Do please check that both can fit on your stove top at the same time. My past pots served 20 years only ever failed with salt air corrosion long after the internal non-stick surface died. Great baking also. Go pressure cookers. This is a great post and correspondence . A
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Old 11-12-2016, 14:03   #45
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Re: Pressure Cooker vs slow cooker without electricity

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmksails View Post
Sea Dreamer - I'm not following how removing the cooker and wrapping it in a blanket works - can you do this for all recipes or just for certain ones. For instance, I looked up a pot roast recipe. It says to bring the cooker to high pressure over medium heat, then once pressure is reached, reduce the heat enough to maintain pressure. Cook this way for 1 hours


So, would I remove it from heat when it reached pressure, wrap in blanket and it would still cook? Would it be ready in an hour, or would I need to wait longer?
Google "retained heat cooking." Tons of recipes. Although I have cooked a lot of things, the most common is actually rice, because it frees up a burner and it's so easy.

The principle is simple. Once the food has reached temperature (boil plus 5-10 minutes to heat through if there are big chunks), all simmering is doing is maintaining temperature, which good insulation will do. The trick is that the insulation needs to be VERY good. I did a comparison of units for a magazine. The best will hold over 150F for over 12 hours.

But it takes more than a blanket. Most are either vacuum bottles or are quite thick.


Recipes
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