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Old 04-01-2011, 15:57   #46
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hard copy only? sniff
Just google your boat: Cal 2-29 with the word 'review' and you'll find a bunch:
Owner review of the Cal 2-29 by Neil McBride
My Product Gallery - 2-29 - Powered by ReviewPost

There are a couple more on sailnet.com in a duplicate post.
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Old 04-01-2011, 17:09   #47
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Well this makes a change from the I have never sailed but want to buy a boat and sail around the world.
Even just sitting on a mooring, (rather like doing solitary) you will need to use a dinghy. I doubt you can tie up to a fuel dock to reprovision. Even with a ladder getting in and out of a dinghy which is unstable requires some agility. Maybe you can motor it with oars backup.
From a practical point of view even if unplanned once you begin moving around you will fairly often need to move around an unstable platform fairly smartly with good balance.
I had to take 8 months out with a slow healing leg injury which restricted but did not eliminate movement. It wasn't safe to take the boat out or dock it.
That said I know guys who are still sailing on a restricted basis in their 70s after many years experience.
The previous owners may help you initially but I think that would be bare bones indeed.
Being on a moving boat is likely to help you develop some more flexibility but you would still need to work on fitness. In fact I suggest you need to make an early start on this as regular exercise will improve your strength.
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Old 04-01-2011, 17:29   #48
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yes, i agree, and i have been doing more and more... and will take my time when i do get on board and learn to get my sea legs...and yea, i too thought about the old salts and how they still did/do whatever it is they do... and I believe and hope I am better then some of them. (I mean more 'agile')

that plus all the stories of peg legs... and eye patches.....heheheheheh
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Old 04-01-2011, 18:03   #49
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hard copy only? sniff
Get a subscription, and also pick up a copy of Don Casey's "This Old Boat"- Both are worth far far more than what you will pay for them.

Hello sailor has some excellent advice. Don't start cutting and gutting on your boat until you have lived aboard for at least six months. Plans and concepts tend to change when you move from the theoretical to the practical.
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Old 04-01-2011, 18:03   #50
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The most essential item if you want to single-hand is an autopilot, so you can motor slowly to windward while raising the main and hold a course while adjusting the genoa and any other sail controls. It's all in the timing -- once you get the sequence clear in your mind you can do a lot very efficiently.

I sail a 40-foot trimaran (28 foot beam) singlehanded, with LOTS of sail area, and the only time I really need crew is when approaching a dock while the wind/current is conspiring to keep me away from it, or when picking up a mooring when the wind is up. Hover-time is the issue. Any other time I have no issues and help from the autopilot is enough.

You don't need self tailors, and you don't need to worry about reefing the main (assuming reef points are built in) so long as you have an autopilot..... it steers while you crew.

I agree with other posters that a dodger is very important -- much higher priority. Self tailing winches are nice to have but not essential. There will be cleats placed where needed. A bimini is also important but less so than a dodger. The sun and weather can beat you pretty bad and wear you down, so you need protection from the cold wind/rain/spray and hot sun.
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Old 04-01-2011, 18:20   #51
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OP. In my view given how you've described yourself and your experience , the last thing I'd do right now is buy a boat. First thing go sailing as crew on other peoples boats, understand what works for you. Learn the basics etc. Then look at buying, otherwise you will allmost certainly buy something not suited

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Old 04-01-2011, 18:20   #52
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I would advise you to take a deep breath and relax a bit. My partner and I are women in our 50's and although we have self-tailing winches, they are not electric, and we manage quite fine. (Including hoisting each other up the mast when needed ;-)
We bought our 36' sailing cat 5 years ago and although it has been a learning experience getting to know our boat, it was MUCH easier than I had anticipated, or worried about initially. I would recommend taking the course for at least an OUPV license unless you are an experienced boater. It's important to know the rules of the road. We both had power boat experience but got our licenses anyway and took diesel engine courses (yuk) just the same.
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Old 04-01-2011, 18:30   #53
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i appreciate the words of advice,a dnkinda wish i could take more time, but, I will not have a place to stay in Florida... If i rent a place, i will eat into the money i am using for my boat...

taking lessons and having to charter a boat are also kinda pricy compared to being able to use my boat...and learn about my boat at the same time...

I plan to get certified, and teh six-pack will be first on the schedule...

I am hopeful that if i should buy a boat that doesnt 'suit' me, that i will be able to sell it, maybe for a just a little less then i paid for it or maybe break even...

If i find that the boat i get isnt for me, and do sell it for a bit of a loss, i will need as much of my savings as necessary to get the 'right boat'...

I intend on recruiting anyone onto my boat, or hopefully getting invited onto other's boats to learn...

maybe you gals can invite me to crew with you for a little while.. I will be glad to buy provisions or rum or whatever floats your boat..

I welcome any offers of help... and if you ahve spare berthing room, I would be willing to chip in for costs while aboard as well...
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Old 04-01-2011, 18:32   #54
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Rum speaks to me.
Where in Florida are you?
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Old 04-01-2011, 18:46   #55
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Bergavoy....
Of all the many members on CF I doubt if more than 5.. maybe 10% here have the boat they 'Really Want'.... so forget that... as a species we are never satisfied with what we have...
So if alls OK with the Cal 29 and to your satisfaction go for it... stop looking at/for other boats till it falls through...
All thats doing is distracting you from doing the important things like downloading and studying important stuff you can self learn like the Rules of the Road, Navigation Marks and Lights, Basic Waterway/Coastal Navigation.....
From the sound of it you have a decent boat in a location you like and the current owner is more than happy to go day sailing with you and familiarise you with the boat.... WTFMore do you want....
OK... its $7500... OK its a new place.... so bloody what...
Your making the move... just keep putting one step in front of the other and remember one thing... 27ft to 30ft are pretty much the same in cruising boats.... just a few extra inches here and there....
Step out and live..... "Its a Brand New Dawn...."
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Old 04-01-2011, 19:08   #56
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Originally Posted by boatman61
Bergavoy....
Of all the many members on CF I doubt if more than 5.. maybe 10% here have the boat they 'Really Want'.... so forget that... as a species we are never satisfied with what we have...
I'd disagree here , there's a world of difference between experienced sailers accepting a compromise in the full knowledge of the pros and cons on a particular decision , that's very difference from a newbie using perhaps " book learning" to arrive at a decision.

I have had direct involvement with a newbie owner once who based all his decisions on reading a set of vey well known cruising guides etc. It resulted in a fixation on irrelevant things. ( the boat was lost on it's maiden voyage but that's another story). It's like the OP and his comments on electric winches on a 29 footer. ( sorry OP).

OP buying a boat because you have nowhere to live is a mistake, buy a tent then go sailing. Don't obsess on ruled and regs etc , these make sense out on the water pointed out by a competent skipper. Then if you wish go up the certification ladder. But theta nothing like time on the water to explain the relevant stuff. (which is rich coming from me as a RYA instructor)

Dave

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Old 04-01-2011, 19:09   #57
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If i find that the boat i get isnt for me, and do sell it for a bit of a loss, i will need as much of my savings as necessary to get the 'right boat'...
Don't rush into gutting the interior (as you posted prior). Unless you do a very fine craftsman's job you will almost certainly devalue the market price of the boat by changing it. Wiring to marine ABYC standards is also going to require study before you tackle it.

Also, as another poster noted, you might be surprised how important the furniture and bulkheads are to the structure, and how those components are attached is critical, as well. Make sure you consult with a surveyor or other person knowledgeable about how boats work, structurally.
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Old 04-01-2011, 19:29   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
I'd disagree here , there's a world of difference between experienced sailers accepting a compromise in the full knowledge of the pros and cons on a particular decision , that's very difference from a newbie using perhaps " book learning" to arrive at a decision.

I have had direct involvement with a newbie owner once who based all his decisions on reading a set of vey well known cruising guides etc. It resulted in a fixation on irrelevant things. ( the boat was lost on it's maiden voyage but that's another story). It's like the OP and his comments on electric winches on a 29 footer. ( sorry OP).

OP buying a boat because you have nowhere to live is a mistake, buy a tent then go sailing. Don't obsess on ruled and regs etc , these make sense out on the water pointed out by a competent skipper. Then if you wish go up the certification ladder. But theta nothing like time on the water to explain the relevant stuff. (which is rich coming from me as a RYA instructor)

Dave

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Hey... you added on there as I was responding...LOL
He has no plans of sail right away except with the PO... he has somewhere to live, he's just sick of living there... he'll probably spend the 1st year pottering on the ICW which is nothing like anything in Europe except maybe heading up to Wareham or some of the remote creeks in SE UK and Norfolk with withey sticks in the mud as channel marks...
I credit the guy with some inteligence and caution garnered over the years...
My point was he's looking to hard at the wrong things... he's got the chance of a good basic boat and home... forget the rest and concentrate on how to reconise channels and marks... which is the right side etc... start working the body and mind instead of hours in front of a screen trolling irrelevant crap and blurb about the latest must have or you'll die crap like Chartplotters, Radar, Sat Phones and EPIRBS....
As an RYA instructor I'd have thought you'd encourage a newbie learning at the least the rules of the road and navigation marks.... its not some mystic lore written in latin for the priviliged few.. its simple common sense.
As a matter of fact is that not how the RYA teach it Theory then Practical or does memory decieve me... and it can be done DIY... the quals come later.. as and when needed...
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Old 04-01-2011, 19:46   #59
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sorry if i indicated that i would do the remodel right away.. nothing is happening right away... and, I have strong hands on construction, and senior level construction managment, and know enough to not do something blatantly wrong and cut/demo something i dont know is structural.. I had no intent on doing permanent damage.. My assumption was that most of the wood surfaces were non structural pieces... I assume any 'wood' or other sturctural members are encased and or lamentated into the fiberglass structure... and again, my personal experience has never included fibergblass... so therefore that would be off limits unless okayed by an expert sailor/mechanic..

I am not going to do anything immediately or within the first six months or so... except to learn... take lessons, book, and on water... sail with whomever will have me... figure out how to motor on to the dock to refuel... make arrangements for pumping service, (how often is normal btw?)

AFter i learn and after i meet folks and get more confirmation of my intent then I will invst time and a little money into the boat, assuming she suits me.. and yes, i truly believe she does at this point at least enuf to invest into the gamble....

and yes, you all make great points... i understand newbies shouldnt rush off into something.. and if I was spending more money or more then I can afford to 'lose', and or over spending on something, maybe like buying brand new off the lot, type of thing this would be more important... but boatman has heard and discussed this issue on another thread, and i have vasilated, and I do go back and forth, and that is my nature... if i was in 'my comfort zone', I would take forever to do something...and now I am already out of my zone and getting ready to be in a different universe zone...and that is what i want...

and at the rate things are going, I will end up in florida before i actually buy the boat, since i havent gotten the boat survey yet... but from the correspondance, it seems the owners have repaired all (both of them), items indicated on the survey.. the surveyor recalls the boat was priced fairly at almost half his valuation.. and that the boat was clean, didnt smell, was well maintained and only had two minor repairs needed, (level A, i think he said, ??? the minimal level or concern)



And for the record, I dont mind the information and or suggestion or words of caution pro or con... and I hope you dont mind if I or someone doesnt necessarily take your advice one way or another or one time or another...It's all good...


And boat gals, i mean womensetsail i am not in florida yet.. i have no destination other then wherever my boat that i buy is currently floating.. the boat i am interested in and have expressed my intent to buy with the owners is in key west, bight harbor...

I intend on driiving and taking about 10 days an dstopping at a couple spots along the way... and then maybe tampa bay , meyers beach area, and then over to dade county...

The prices are kinda cheaper there...boats and slips...

thats the plan anyways...
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Old 04-01-2011, 19:56   #60
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i have been a saltwater aquarium keeper for about 6-7 years and I saw a lot of people who would buy first and ask second, (although they thought they did research first by talking to the guy at the pet shop)...

and i do understand dave's position... but to add to my example, if the person were to do some research and buy second hand and DIY stuff, and indicate his intent to stock the aquarium slowly, then i would be more receptive to him and believe he may have the chance at success...
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