Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 26-08-2017, 05:06   #46
Registered User
 
rwidman's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 4,669
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Moving from land onto a boat is a big step. Rather than rushing out to buy a boat, I suggest spending a good amount of time reading books and surfing the Internet to learn about boats and boating.

Get on boats whenever you get the chance. Talk to boaters, especially those who live on boats.

If you are thinking that living on a stationary boat in a marina is cheaper than living in an apartment, it is not.

If you're thinking of living on and travelling to different locations, it can be exciting.
__________________

__________________
Ron
HIGH COTTON
Sent from my laptop using Windows 7
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 05:17   #47
Registered User
 
dwedeking2's Avatar

Join Date: May 2014
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Boat: Morgan Out Island 415
Posts: 470
Images: 1
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
If you are thinking that living on a stationary boat in a marina is cheaper than living in an apartment, it is not.
Marina fees must be high at your location. Here in north Florida I save $400 a month vs living in a one-bedroom apartment. I quickly spend that (and more) in refitting the boat as it's my retirement plan, but if I didn't really care about moving the boat and just used it as a place to live a $5k boat would pay for itself in a couple of years. There's a number of people that live aboard house boats at the marina I stay at.
__________________

dwedeking2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 09:15   #48
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 2,597
Re: New to Living on a Boat

House boats are becoming quite popular. I did a quick search on Craigslist & came up with this option which is pretty interesting & in your price range. Actually includes a trailer & a truck to pull it!

https://portland.craigslist.org/grg/...275099915.html
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 10:35   #49
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 457
Re: New to Living on a Boat

That Oregon boat looks pretty nice, actually, for a pontoon boat. It is actually about the same size or larger than many RVs that people live in today, and as you have use of the upper deck with little to no modification, is larger in square footage than many single-wide (and some double) mobile homes.

I think that people today get too hung up on how large their house is and the opulence level they can display to their neighbors. Another thing that is lost on some folks is that this boat is one that can be easily pulled if a Hurricane threatens and moved inland rather easily, it can also be hauled for free for repairs and hull cleanings or coatings, and it can be moved to alternative locations far more cost effectively and in only small percentages of spent time should a person want to change coasts or go from one body of water to another. I think it is a danged good idea if you are not crossing oceans or getting into sea state situations.

That said, there is NO way I would take this sort of boat into a real seaway without some danged good assurances that it would arrive at the destination intact and able to return somehow along an alternative route should the trip be more difficult than anticipated or if weather became a concern. Still, for ICW cruising, this boat is PERFECT!
__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 10:44   #50
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 560
Re: New to Living on a Boat

I actually live a few miles from the location of that seller and I can tell you that I've never seen anything like that out on the big river where summer winds typically hit 35 kts on summer afternoons. Those pontoon boats are for calm inland lakes. Maybe he found that out the hard way...

There was a smaller one on a regular powerboat hull at my former marina - never saw it leave the slip.
toddster8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 11:08   #51
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 2,597
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by toddster8 View Post
I actually live a few miles from the location of that seller and I can tell you that I've never seen anything like that out on the big river where summer winds typically hit 35 kts on summer afternoons. Those pontoon boats are for calm inland lakes. Maybe he found that out the hard way...

There was a smaller one on a regular powerboat hull at my former marina - never saw it leave the slip.
I agree, this is not a cruiser. I guess you could take it out on a calm day but mostly I think it's an economical way to live on the water. There has been a movement towards small houseboats that are meant to be just docked & lived or cruised in protected waters only lately. In fact Offcenterharbor recently had a houseboat design contest which generated some pretty interesting results.

https://www.offcenterharbor.com/2016...emi-finalists/
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 11:23   #52
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 2,597
Re: New to Living on a Boat

When I said this was a recent trend it seems I was mistaken. Looks like shantyboats have been around a long time and not just in the US.
The Shantyboat – A Secret History of American River People
Homepage | ShantyboatLiving.com
Houseboat Building in Australia - Build a Houseboat
https://www.pinterest.com/zdismuke/shanty-boats/
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 11:25   #53
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 560
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Portland (and points downstream) allegedly has the largest number of houseboats in the US. Many thousands of them permanently moored. There may still be a few "shack-on-barrels" types hidden in some remote back-channels, but for the most part they are pretty expensive. And due to the need for specialized utility hook-ups, they are mostly clustered close together. Too crowded for my taste. We used to visit friends of my Grandparents in one of the anchorages. Back when the toilets still flushed right into the river...



toddster8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 11:32   #54
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 560
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scout 30 View Post
When I said this was a recent trend it seems I was mistaken. Looks like shantyboats have been around a long time and not just in the US.
The Shantyboat A Secret History of American River People
Homepage | ShantyboatLiving.com
Houseboat Building in Australia - Build a Houseboat
https://www.pinterest.com/zdismuke/shanty-boats/
There are two widely-circulated stories about floating shacks in Oregon. In the 19th century, lumber mill-workers liked them because they could moor right at most mills and move them from job to job. There are historical photos of, for example, the yacht basin at Saint Helens - a hundred years ago, it was all houseboats. Then in the 20th century, Oregon passed prohibition before it was a national law. But the state had no jurisdiction over vessels on navigable water. So you could have all the booze you wanted on a floating home!
toddster8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 11:34   #55
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: W Carib
Boat: Wildcat 35, Hobie 33
Posts: 8,829
Re: New to Living on a Boat

If just to live aboard no reason to mess with a sailboat. Buy a houseboat and get more sq ft/$.
belizesailor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 26-08-2017, 13:14   #56
Registered User
 
Scout 30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Florida
Boat: Scout 30
Posts: 2,597
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by toddster8 View Post
There are two widely-circulated stories about floating shacks in Oregon. In the 19th century, lumber mill-workers liked them because they could moor right at most mills and move them from job to job. There are historical photos of, for example, the yacht basin at Saint Helens - a hundred years ago, it was all houseboats. Then in the 20th century, Oregon passed prohibition before it was a national law. But the state had no jurisdiction over vessels on navigable water. So you could have all the booze you wanted on a floating home!
Another great reason to live on the water! I bet they had some great parties but I wonder how many fell off their boats & drowned. Seriously though, we've got a little waterfront home which is neat but you're still waking up on the ground. Nowhere near as cool as waking up on the boat.
Scout 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2017, 14:47   #57
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 170
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikki S View Post
Start looking at boats you think interest you by Opening every hatch in the floor, finding all the through hulls, keel bolts, and having a good look in every nook and cranny. turn the gate valves, etc. Take the front off electrical panels etc, If you can get your camera-phone into where the fuel tanks are take photos to check for rust. See what quality water comes out of the water tanks. Turn the stove on and any other appliances. Look in ever cupboard for signs of leaks from above. Get the hose onto it if possible- especially around the mast. Look for papers/old invoices that show maintenance history. A well maintained boat will generally have a record of the maintenance because it is valuable when selling to be able to show it. Inspect all the big ticket items- motor, generator, winches, rigging, teak decks, tanks, Inspect lots of boats and ask lots of questions before falling in love with one of them. Ask if someone can take you for a sail in it if possible. A boat that sails regularly is going to be lower risk than one that has sat in a marina unused for years. When you find 'the one', Get the boat out of the water and get a proper survey. Don't let love blind you to potential costs or issues that could stop you from ever getting out of the marina. A simpler boat is often a better choice because you'll have less to go wrong/maintain. Find out what other boats of that make and vintage are selling for around the world, and offer below average. It's a buyers market and a global market.
If you are looking at keel bolts, you're looking at the wrong boat :-) Full keels with Barn door rudders and protected props all the way!!!
Alberg30Shill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2018, 15:33   #58
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 4
Re: New to Living on a Boat

The advice that I've seen in this one thread has been more informative than every other thread that I've read combined, thank you to everyone for your input. I have zero experience with anything outside of a fishing boat, and I'm not interested in sailboats. I know what kind of boat I want, I know what I want to do, I have almost all of the resources at my disposal, but lack the experience and expertise that many of you have. I grew up in Tampa, Fl. but the Army has seen it fit to stick me in the stinky sphincter of the US known as Kentucky. I'm working on getting away from this cesspool, and hopefully will be able to within the next few weeks. I read a post here suggesting finding an owner that would more or less rent out their live-aboard. I love the idea, but I would want something that is at least CLOSE to what I have in mind for when I buy my own.
That in mind, if anyone has, or knows someone that has a 75' - 90' motor yacht akin to an older (1980's - 1990's) Canados 80 or Technomarine that they would be willing to let and/or use to teach a 41 y/o slightly disabled veteran, I would be most appreciative.
Let me be very clear, this is NOT a midlife crisis, it is something that I have been dreaming of and working toward for some years, and it WILL happen regardless of any help that I may or may not get. However, I believe in working smarter, not harder, and I like to draw on other's experiences and knowledge to make things easier for me and safer for others. So, again, all advice is welcome and appreciated.
One more thing, if anyone is willing to help show me the ropes (pun definitely intended) by letting me join on a voyage this coming summer, I would be more than happy to pull my own weight as best I can given my limited experience...
Wasp77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2018, 15:45   #59
Marine Service Provider
 
boatpoker's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Toronto, Ontario or Bahamas
Boat: Benford 38 Fantail Cruiser
Posts: 2,931
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wasp77 View Post
The advice that I've seen in this one thread has been more informative than every other thread that I've read combined, thank you to everyone for your input. I have zero experience with anything outside of a fishing boat, and I'm not interested in sailboats. I know what kind of boat I want, I know what I want to do, I have almost all of the resources at my disposal, but lack the experience and expertise that many of you have. I grew up in Tampa, Fl. but the Army has seen it fit to stick me in the stinky sphincter of the US known as Kentucky. I'm working on getting away from this cesspool, and hopefully will be able to within the next few weeks. I read a post here suggesting finding an owner that would more or less rent out their live-aboard. I love the idea, but I would want something that is at least CLOSE to what I have in mind for when I buy my own.
That in mind, if anyone has, or knows someone that has a 75' - 90' motor yacht akin to an older (1980's - 1990's) Canados 80 or Technomarine that they would be willing to let and/or use to teach a 41 y/o slightly disabled veteran, I would be most appreciative.
Let me be very clear, this is NOT a midlife crisis, it is something that I have been dreaming of and working toward for some years, and it WILL happen regardless of any help that I may or may not get. However, I believe in working smarter, not harder, and I like to draw on other's experiences and knowledge to make things easier for me and safer for others. So, again, all advice is welcome and appreciated.
One more thing, if anyone is willing to help show me the ropes (pun definitely intended) by letting me join on a voyage this coming summer, I would be more than happy to pull my own weight as best I can given my limited experience...
Attitude is 90% of the game. I have no doubt you'll get where you want to go.
__________________
That hysterical laughter you hear as you sail a way in your "new" boat ..... is the seller.
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2018, 16:36   #60
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: fl- various marinas
Boat: morgan O/I 33' sloop
Posts: 1,208
Re: New to Living on a Boat

Try to begin with a budget. Forget leasing a live-aboard. The economics mean only junk will be available. Sorry you hate Ky. Best plan is move to a coast and spend time walking docks. Live aboard life is simple- if you are not cramped in a very small studio apartment you might be OK.
__________________

Dave22q is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
boat

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Living on a Sail Boat in New Orleans area? CaptainHooks Liveaboard's Forum 21 22-09-2014 10:45
New to Living Aboard and Owning a Boat HerBoat Meets & Greets 5 09-01-2011 16:23
Make a Living, Living Aboard JanetGroene Boat Ownership & Making a Living 0 19-11-2010 11:28
Monthly Expenses Living on Land vs Living on a Boat in a Marina Ocean Roads Liveaboard's Forum 31 17-11-2010 16:47



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 15:45.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.