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Old 24-09-2013, 15:52   #16
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

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to the ones who know:
I'm having some problems with my engine cooling system and I thought to converted back to raw water cooling eliminating heat exchanger ,circulation pump, etc
volvo penta 2002
is this a bad idea?
thanks in advanced

That would seem to be a step backwards, to me, but I have no familiarity with your specific engine. Prob'ly useful to start a separate thread in the engines/propulsion section and with a nifty title that brings the Volvo specialists out in force.

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Old 24-09-2013, 18:48   #17
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There's a huge difference in cost by geographical area and specific marina. We are often underway and sometimes up to Maine for the summer. We're in Florida or further south for the winter and we never pay anything for heating. We usually stay in a marina for the months of Nov.,Dec., & Jan. in North Florida on our 41' for about $500/month for liveaboard slip at a great marina with all utilities including unmetered electricity, - even a swimming pool and free ice! We find everything north of Maryland more expensive and remaining low through Florida except selected "resort marinas" in South Florida. We have some friends that are Annapolis area liveaboards that often post here as "wingNwing". You might want to search their posts for some additional advice. By the way, I keep a beautiful wooden boat that can be viewed as a framed photograph in the main cabin of my fiberglass boat! Also the pool in North Florida is far warmer in the winter than the water on the beaches in Maine during the summer!
Agreed but the OP is talking about living in MD. Annapolis will require heating. And my figure excluded boat maintenance which can be huge.
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Old 25-09-2013, 12:02   #18
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

Wow, thank you for all the honest advice!! I am reading them all carefully and sharing with my "partner in crime"

Another thing we are running into... nice fiberglass boats... but with no engine or no working engine? What? How would that even play out?

Agreed, it sounds like the big, beautiful wooden boat (see here: Used 1970 Trojan 42 Sea Voyager, Cambridge, Md - 21613 - BoatTrader.com) would be too much for a young, newly liveaboard couple.

We're actually looking forward to having projects on a boat. My fiance is the type who loves anything to do with working with his hands. Mechanic by trade, has flipped houses, etc. So while we are no experts, we're excited for some of the challenges that come with boats. That being said, we're not looking to use all our savings and living on something that may sink during the night We're fine with a used boat with some projects, but not looking for one that needs a complete overhaul.
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Old 25-09-2013, 15:57   #19
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I am not sure about Annapolis but around here all the marinas require that a boat be able to enter and leave its slip under its own power.
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Old 25-09-2013, 16:35   #20
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

kyersten,
After looking at the listing all I can say is walk away swiftly or run if capable. The boat is leaking all over the place. I see water stained floors, walls, and ceilings, even the furniture and bedding seems to be affected. Mold and mildew is prevalent along with a lot of peeling and flaking paint. The canvas is on its last leg and the electronics are museum quality and this is just from the pictures provided. No telling what is being hidden or obscured.
Oh yeah, it's made of wood also.
Sorry, but in my opinion it's not worth your time or effort.
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Old 25-09-2013, 17:14   #21
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

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I am not sure about Annapolis but around here all the marinas require that a boat be able to enter and leave its slip under its own power.
thanks Tim R! I was thinking that was probably the case... makes sense! Besides, why have a boat if you cannot drive it? How expensive do engines usually run... or is that a very wide range?
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Old 25-09-2013, 17:15   #22
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

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kyersten,
After looking at the listing all I can say is walk away swiftly or run if capable. The boat is leaking all over the place. I see water stained floors, walls, and ceilings, even the furniture and bedding seems to be affected. Mold and mildew is prevalent along with a lot of peeling and flaking paint. The canvas is on its last leg and the electronics are museum quality and this is just from the pictures provided. No telling what is being hidden or obscured.
Oh yeah, it's made of wood also.
Sorry, but in my opinion it's not worth your time or effort.
Running away!!! Thank OutofControl
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Old 25-09-2013, 17:40   #23
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

I have lived aboard for 5 years. My slip rent is $600 which included electric and water. During the winter I use a bottle of propane every three weeks. Refils cost about $27. I have a shower aboard but elect to use the shore side facilities. There are other exoenses but those thend to be elective. For example, I recently bought an Aries self steering vane for $2k. I also bought two new sails last year for $4k. Those were elective one time expenses.

As for wood over GRP, mister you better be some marine carpenter to go with wood. A wood boat is like a Hepplewhite hutch that floats. It takes years (and lots of shop tools) to acquire the skills to master the trade. GRP is much more forgiving. As for tools, not much more that a disk sander and a few odds and ends. You can learn preaty much all you need online. There are lots of books around too. Try, Fiberglass Boat Building for Amateurs by Ken Hankinson.

Life on a boat is a bit different. It is mostly subtractive. That is, you will have to leave about 80% of your shore side stuff on the shore. You will save lots of money because you will not be able to buy much in the way of consumer goods and clothing. This may cause female problems. Even so, Edith (my cat) and I wouldn't want to live ashore again.
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Old 25-09-2013, 20:34   #24
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

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I have lived aboard for 5 years. My slip rent is $600 which included electric and water. During the winter I use a bottle of propane every three weeks. Refils cost about $27. I have a shower aboard but elect to use the shore side facilities. There are other exoenses but those thend to be elective. For example, I recently bought an Aries self steering vane for $2k. I also bought two new sails last year for $4k. Those were elective one time expenses.

As for wood over GRP, mister you better be some marine carpenter to go with wood. A wood boat is like a Hepplewhite hutch that floats. It takes years (and lots of shop tools) to acquire the skills to master the trade. GRP is much more forgiving. As for tools, not much more that a disk sander and a few odds and ends. You can learn preaty much all you need online. There are lots of books around too. Try, Fiberglass Boat Building for Amateurs by Ken Hankinson.

Life on a boat is a bit different. It is mostly subtractive. That is, you will have to leave about 80% of your shore side stuff on the shore. You will save lots of money because you will not be able to buy much in the way of consumer goods and clothing. This may cause female problems. Even so, Edith (my cat) and I wouldn't want to live ashore again.
Thankfully, neither of us have much of our own household goods, so we are a perfect fit (literally) for a boat!

Thank you for some ideas of costs monthly! We will be making a trip to the library to check out some of those books
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Old 25-09-2013, 22:51   #25
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Re: new here - opinions appreciated!

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Hiya Kyersten, and welcome aboard! Stay away from any wooden boat; even if it is free. As a novice sailor, you want a boat with an "average maintenance cost and upkeep"; wooden boats are very expensive to maintain, by comparison. Get a fiberglass boat; you'll be glad you did. Keep us posted on your search. Good luck!

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Yeah but what are aircraft costs compared to the cost of a wooden boat, especially a float plane?
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Old 25-09-2013, 23:46   #26
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

Hiya Adelie! The Twin Otter float plane costs about $8M USD. There are 10 of us who lease it, as a group, when we go on vacation two weeks at a time; none of us can afford to own it. It is no different than a bare-boat charter, but this bird can fly thus reducing the time getting to our destinations. Maintenance and upkeep are factored in the leasing cost.

Wooden boats require a never ending labor of love to maintain. Very expensive maintenance and upkeep are way too much for novice sailors, hence the suggestion to opt for a fiberglass boat ownership.

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Old 26-09-2013, 00:34   #27
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

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Originally Posted by kyersten View Post
Wow, thank you for all the honest advice!! I am reading them all carefully and sharing with my "partner in crime"

Another thing we are running into... nice fiberglass boats... but with no engine or no working engine? What? How would that even play out?

Agreed, it sounds like the big, beautiful wooden boat (see here: Used 1970 Trojan 42 Sea Voyager, Cambridge, Md - 21613 - BoatTrader.com) would be too much for a young, newly liveaboard couple.

We're actually looking forward to having projects on a boat. My fiance is the type who loves anything to do with working with his hands. Mechanic by trade, has flipped houses, etc. So while we are no experts, we're excited for some of the challenges that come with boats. That being said, we're not looking to use all our savings and living on something that may sink during the night We're fine with a used boat with some projects, but not looking for one that needs a complete overhaul.
Kyerston,
I'm not recommending this boat by posting a link.
1968 Trojan Sea Voyager MY Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

As it's roughly the same model as you linked, you could maybe compare the condition of each, reflect on the differences between the two and get a rough idea of what $ + time is needed to bring the first boat up the standard of the second?
I really don't know if the second boat is 'good value' and I'm not suggesting that, just drawing your attention to it for comparison sake.
Cheers,
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Old 26-09-2013, 01:02   #28
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

Seems you got BOAT FEVER, VERY COMMON for young inexperienced would be boat owners. I have horror stories about used wooden boats.
Do not buy an old wooden boat. Too many reasons to list here.

Run.....do not walkay.......Run away. Buy a sailboat. Good luck.

You have a winning idea, but slowly find the best boat. One is out there waitting for you.
This is why we are all here on this forum, to help each other learn, mostly share mistakes we have all previously made.
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Old 26-09-2013, 05:52   #29
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

Have owned wood, steel and fiberglass boats and found each had good and bad points.

Wood boats can be cheap to purchase and many have beautiful interiors. But as many have pointed out, upkeep and repair could be a lot. ONLY buy a wood boat if you have one of two things:

1. A lot of money to pay a professional to maintain the boat

2. A lot of time, skills and tools to do it yourself.

Maintaining a wooden boat is already in good condition is not a huge job but does requires vigilance and constant, ongoing work. Getting a boat into that condition can be huge.

Also even on a wood boat in good condition there are a couple of jobs that will be big, a complete paint job every few years and when the boat needs refastening (replacing all the screws that hold the boat together when the screws or boards get old).

So my recommendation, unless you and/or your SO are skilled wood workers and have the tools and time to do the work, stick with fiberglass.

I guess there is one other reason to buy a wood boat. If you find one that needs work but isn't sinking at the dock and is so cheap that you can afford to give it away when you want to move up then maybe give it a go.
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Old 26-09-2013, 06:49   #30
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Re: New Here - Opinions Appreciated!

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Originally Posted by kyersten View Post
Wow, thank you for all the honest advice!! I am reading them all carefully and sharing with my "partner in crime"

Another thing we are running into... nice fiberglass boats... but with no engine or no working engine? What? How would that even play out?

Agreed, it sounds like the big, beautiful wooden boat (see here: Used 1970 Trojan 42 Sea Voyager, Cambridge, Md - 21613 - BoatTrader.com) would be too much for a young, newly liveaboard couple.

We're actually looking forward to having projects on a boat. My fiance is the type who loves anything to do with working with his hands. Mechanic by trade, has flipped houses, etc. So while we are no experts, we're excited for some of the challenges that come with boats. That being said, we're not looking to use all our savings and living on something that may sink during the night We're fine with a used boat with some projects, but not looking for one that needs a complete overhaul.
I f that boat dosent have any sprung planks or rotten frames (sister frames give an Idea of where damage may have or will be in the future)and has a dry interior it should be a fine boat ,it needs paint for sure,check it out ,good luck..
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