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Old 20-09-2005, 06:04   #16
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A little information about “Unvented Gas Space Heating Appliances”:
http://www.abe.iastate.edu/human_house/aen204.asp

Venting (Chimney)Types:

Unvented
Unvented gas heaters are not vented to the outside. Gases produced from combustion, and water vapour are released directly into the heated space (increases interior pollution & humidity). An oxygen detection safety (ODS) system (per ANSI Z21.11.2) is supposed to protect against oxygen depletion and any interruption in the fuel supply. If either occurs, the gas is shut off to the burner, turning the heater off - you hope. This type of gas heater is generally only recommended for temporary or supplemental use ~ I wouldn’t recommend their use at any time. The installation of vent free gas products should always be performed by a qualified technician who is able to ensure that all manufacturers instructions have been followed during installation, and all code requirements have been satisfied.
Currently seven US States prohibit residential use: Alaska, Massachusetts, Montana, Minnesota, Colorado, Utah, and California, and International Conference of Building Officials-Uniform Mechanical Code (ICBO-UMC) does not permit these products.
Did I mention that I don’t recommend un-vented appliances?

Gravity
These gas heaters require vertical venting because the exhaust must rise through the vent pipe and is expelled outside. They are dependent on natural drafts to move the exhaust through the vent pipe. Outside air must be brought into the space to replace the exhausted air.

Power
Power vented heaters are equipped with a blower that pushes the exhaust air through the vent pipe and outside of the structure. Most power vented heaters can be vented vertically or horizontally and use smaller vent pipes than similar size gravity vented heaters increasing their efficiency. Outside air must be brought into the space to replace the exhausted air.

Direct
Direct venting is unique to sealed combustion heaters. When heated exhaust air leaves the vent pipe, it automatically pulls in the same amount of outside air in exchange for combustion. The outside air is also heated as it passes over the exhaust pipe and into the combustion chamber. No additional outside air must be brought into the space to replace the exhausted air. I highly recommend Direct Vented, Sealed Combustion Heaters for boats, and others.

FWIW,
Gord
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Old 20-09-2005, 13:23   #17
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Free wood is costly.

Having lived in the northeast all my life, I know well the free wood. Almost every manufacturer that receives palletted supplies will give away the skids for firewood. I figure that my time is more valuable than the cost of picking-up, cutting, splitting, hauling, stacking, time and fuel necessary to get "free firewood". The next thing you need to consider is your voyaging career. How much wood do you think will be available to cook on in the Caribbean or other tropical islands? Coconut wood is too pulpy to burn well and give any desired heat.
While I don't think that your idea is bad, I think that you need to give it more thought. Don't cut off your nose to spite your face. There is a reason that most cruisers use propane and most manufacturers install propane in their boats.
If I were to lean toward an alternative source of fuel, I would lean toward a diesel stove with an in-stove heater. The fuel is readibly available anywhere in the world, can be turned on and off without a long heat-up or cool-down period, is relatively clean and is stored aboard anyways.
JMHO
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Old 20-09-2005, 16:18   #18
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Re: Free wood is costly.

Um.... Nobody is talking about cooking with wood on this thread. ???

Also, diesel cookstoves (if we are going this far off topic) require an enormous heat up / cool down cycle. Same as wood. Check out the Dickinson.

You are from the north east, but you're only from Massachusetts. I'm from the woods in NH where it gets cold. I lived for 18 years with only 2 woodstoves heating a 9 room colonial built in the 1700's with very little insulation. (it was the pellet type insulation from the old days, not modern fiberglass) I do have some experience with the subject matter.

Not trying to get into a flame war, so I'm done with this thread. The thread was intended to share my good experience with Andrew at Navigator Stove Works. I'm going to leave it at that. He did a very good job in helping me overcome installation issues surrounding my boat.


Quote:
Jentine once whispered in the wind:
Having lived in the northeast all my life, I know well the free wood. Almost every manufacturer that receives palletted supplies will give away the skids for firewood. I figure that my time is more valuable than the cost of picking-up, cutting, splitting, hauling, stacking, time and fuel necessary to get "free firewood". The next thing you need to consider is your voyaging career. How much wood do you think will be available to cook on in the Caribbean or other tropical islands? Coconut wood is too pulpy to burn well and give any desired heat.
While I don't think that your idea is bad, I think that you need to give it more thought. Don't cut off your nose to spite your face. There is a reason that most cruisers use propane and most manufacturers install propane in their boats.
If I were to lean toward an alternative source of fuel, I would lean toward a diesel stove with an in-stove heater. The fuel is readibly available anywhere in the world, can be turned on and off without a long heat-up or cool-down period, is relatively clean and is stored aboard anyways.
JMHO
Jim
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Old 20-09-2005, 21:46   #19
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One more important addition to this post, Pallet wood is often treated with creosote. Burning this in a small area like a boat, with a stove that is not completely airtight can be deadly.
And who cares if you can not find wood in the tropics? Worst case, throw an extra blanket on. Of course I do vacation in Alaska, so my version of cold is probably slightly skewed
Sean, I look very forward to finding out the burn rate on that stove. Thanks.
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Old 03-10-2005, 16:21   #20
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Wood source...

I just got myself access to as much seasoned, dry hardwood as I need. How much does it cost? Not a thing!

I can go split, cut and pick it up on weekends, and can do that multiple times over the winter. It costs nothing more than the gas to drive there and the extra snack I might need to eat swinging a maul.

Just wanted to make sure after all the negativity on this thread that the facts were presented. You just have to use your noodle to find deals like that. (one man's junk is another man's treasure)
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Old 03-10-2005, 20:01   #21
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Not to mention the theraputic properties of chopping wood As for kindling, When I worked at a macjine shop years ago, we used to get all the hardwood scrap from the cabinet shop next door to keep the burn barrel going. Kept the whole shop warm, and was a great place to hang out after work and have a few.
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Old 21-11-2005, 18:34   #22
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And here is the follow up post!

Sorry I haven't been on the site much lately. I have been feverishly refitting the boat.

Here is the follow up post with a photo showing what having a wood stove is all about! It's the warm glow and ambiance, along with the 28,000 BTUs this thing puts out.

There is very little smoke out the "smoke head" up on deck, and a cubic foot of wood lasts many, many hours.

Still haven't figured out how to put a picture inline into a message on here, so here is a link.

Enjoy!

http://cruisersforum.com/photopost//...t=7&thecat=500
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Old 21-11-2005, 20:20   #23
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Nice, Sean. I think I will leave te picture up on the screen awhile. Makes me warm just looking at it
I would like to see a wider picture of the install. I am still pondering my installation. Since we have been in the 80's the past few weeks, the stove has not made the priority list yet, but the time is coming.
Oh, and your absence has been conspicuous.
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Old 22-11-2005, 10:25   #24
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No Problem

Hi Kai Nui!

No problem. I'll put a little bit of text and a few more photos of the install up in another post later on this week.

The toughest part was finding the stainless steel panels and "mineral wall" required for the heat shield.
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Old 22-11-2005, 11:45   #25
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Stoves

On the subject of stoves, I think I want to change my Richmond Ring stove from pressurized alcohol to kerosene. Anyone know whre I might get info on changing the burners.
I could probably remove the old burners and supply size and fitting specs.
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Old 16-06-2008, 07:51   #26
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PLEASE DO NOT INSTALL ANY UNVENTED HEATER IN YOUR BOAT. ESPECIALLY PROPANE AS IT SEEMS HARMLESS AND THE EXHAUST IS NOT VISIBLE. PLEEEEASE INSTALL A CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR NOW! IT WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE AND THE LIVES OF YOUR LOVED ONES.
Tinman
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Old 16-06-2008, 08:09   #27
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Hey Tinman your caps lock is on.
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Old 16-06-2008, 13:22   #28
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Morgan Paul,
Were you trying to be funny? The caps were intentional. Based on some messages I saw some life threatening conditions could result. My only concern is the safe installation of heating appliances for boats.
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Old 16-06-2008, 14:00   #29
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WELCOME ABOARD !!!
I understand, share, and have written extensively on your concerns regarding cooking & heating appliance safety.
We (especially I, who could use your support on these IMPORTANT SAFETY ISSUES) welcome your expert participation as a long-time heating tradesman..
Notwithstanding, the use of ALL capitals is generally considered to be “shouting”, and generally frowned upon as poor “netiquette”; which may account for Morgan Paul’s comment.
I don’t think his comments were meant to attack your person, nor your professional opinion.
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Old 16-06-2008, 14:42   #30
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I used to have a Dickenson solid wood stove aboard my boat. The deck fitting is still there, should I go back to one of its ilk. I used to burn teak scraps ad other exotic woods, leftovers from projects on mine and others' boats. What I recall is that the amount of heat value, per cubic foot of storage space (dry, of course) wasn't as much as I had hoped for. Then, there was the disposal of the ashes. I'll never forget climbing the companionway steps with the ash tray, and being surprised by a gust of air which blew cold ash everywhere inside. Later, I discovered the trick of simply dumping them in the stainless steel sink and running water down the drain. For my part, when I venture north to the Pacific Northwest, I'll probably be using a diesel heater, such as the Dickenson. You get hot water, dry heat, reasonable fuel cost per hour, MUCH easier maintenance and dependability, and I know I'll be carrying diesel, no matter where I go, even the Tuamotus (not that I'll have a great need for cabin heat there). Also, the issue of the "runaway stove" hasn't been addressed. One very cold night I filled the stove with fine, oil-rich, teak chunks and set it ablaze. Instantly the cabin warmed, then the stove pipe glowed, then it turned red-hot. I had the flue damped down and the air vent shut tight. I stood there for a long ten minutes waiting for the heat to drop so I could open the door and blast the stove with a fire extinguisher (oxygen would only have accellerated the fire). I began to smell the lightest tinge of "burning rubber" as the polyurethane sealant warmed at the cabin top. When the fire suddenly ran out of fuel, everything calmed down immediatly. I stopped using the heater, that night, and put on some more sweaters. The next morning I took everything apart for an inspection. No damage, whatsoever, except for a grey heat scorch on the stove pipe above the flue damper. Still, it got my attention and I began to search for other options. These days I use an electric heater at the dock, but I am still thinking about the diesel heater of my future.
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