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Old 18-12-2009, 09:58   #16
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Now I am getting confused,how about just go to sailing school,learn to sail,see if I get sea sick or if the girlfriend gets sick. In other words combine the training with the experience of sailing all at once (save time and $$$). Yea, Fisherman TX, I have e-mailed Capt. Roger at Northstar he is a very knowledgeable seaman, he is able to teach sailors to become Captains,in fact he stated in one e-mail the requirements for becoming a Captain. I quote: "But one clarification - it is still 360 seas days; a sea day is a minimum of
4 hours, but if it is an 8 or more hour day, it still only counts as 1 sea
day."

I really have no desire to become a Captain ( too many seadays) just a frugal Cruiser on A LIMITED budget,with a change in scenery when I am ready to move my boat.Thanks for the advice...

Tempest- she is fine,blonde, 36 DD'S, and well I'll stop right there before they throw me overboard on this website and ask for me to leave..Yea, I am concerned about lonely sailers...We might can work something out on that bike,I'm sick of it...
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Old 18-12-2009, 11:11   #17
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Now I am getting confused,how about just go to sailing school,learn to sail,see if I get sea sick or if the girlfriend gets sick. In other words combine the training with the experience of sailing all at once (save time and $$$).
Bingo! That'll work!
Take the basics, sail the club boats, find someone to go out with once in a while to feel the larger boats. Go out (with others) in all kinds of weather, you'll need that experience as well. If all is kosher, start looking to buy and take the rest of the courses. Sailing with others will help you get a look and feel for sizes, layouts, etc. Wouldn't hurt to try a Cat as well....
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Old 18-12-2009, 11:15   #18
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Originally Posted by RELEASEME
how about just go to sailing school,learn to sail,see if I get sea sick or if the girlfriend gets sick.
Good start. You may find you don't like sailing. If you do like it, you'll have a good basis to start from. Definitely do not buy a boat until you have at least a little bit of experience sailing, and have an idea of what you really want.

The main thing is, there is no shortcut. Lots of people come onto this forum (and others like it) and just want someone to tell them what boat to buy, how to equip it, where to sail, how to safely cross an ocean (25 words or less, please!) and so on. Those are things you cannot be told. You have to learn for yourself. You're going to have to take time, read, learn, experience. Then you'll figure out your own answers without even having to ask.
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Old 18-12-2009, 11:24   #19
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You mentioned in your original post that you're interested in Island Packets, and that you want to cruise down to the islands. Here's a suggestion.

At some point in the near future, consider flying down to St. Thomas and chartering a captained Island Packet from Island Yachts in Red Hook (Crewed Charters). That will accomplish several things. You'll get to see what it's like to live aboard an Island Packet, you'll be able to get a handle on the "seasick or not" question, you'll get some hands on instruction from the captain, and you'll get a taste of what it's like to sail in the Lesser Antilles.

BTW, I can highly recommend the Island Packet line for long-term cruising. We owned an IP 380 for seven years, and spent several of those cruising the eastern Caribbean.
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Old 18-12-2009, 12:22   #20
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I would strongly recommend you get out on the water on a sailing keel boat with a sailing school as soon as possible, meaning not in 6 months or 3 months time as part of a big overall plan, but straightaway, asap, before doing or planning anything further. Next week would be good. Then you will start to have real experiences to base your analyzing on. Sailing is not at all difficult, but, since it does come with it's own set of dangers, sailing safely and competently demands that you learn the basics of boat handling thoroughly and without skimping. You need to do the practical. Thankfully, it's fun. It's all made up of fairly simple skills. Such as berthing. Bringing your boat cleanly and safely into a spot between two other boats on a crowded pontoon is a bit nerve-wracking at first, but feels good when you do it right. So first you learn to do it in calm conditions, then you do it when the wind is blowing you straight past your slot, then when the wind is trying to blow you away from the whole pontoon, then somewhere upriver where the current is pushing you toward toward the pontoon at 4 knots and the wind is blowing you off etc etc. You have to have this stuff sorted out before you go cruising. Otherwise you risk not enjoying it at all because you won't have any confidence that you will be able to cope with the ordinary basic procedures of boating, an inability which can lead to amusing incidents, serious property damage, injury or death.

So, a few days sailing school will give you a great deal to think about. It will focus your thoughts and you will start to get a practical, real grounding to any further planning. You'll start to get an eye in on what works on a boat and what don't, what you like onboard and don't. With luck you'll come across a really good instructor, many instructors have tens of thousands of cruising miles behind them. And if sailing on a keel boat in sailing school isn't fun for you, then okay you found that out quickly for not much dough. If you like sailing school and like learning the honourable ropes, the American Sailing Association has a pathway from Basics 101 on up through navigation and passage planning to Really Advanced Captain Sir or whatever the correct name is at the moment. Over here in the UK, we have a similar scheme and it's also very good. Oh, and a quick look around the net in your part of the world tells me that there's a sailing school in Galveston called Lakeside. They do keel boat 101. It looks okay from the website, they have offers on at the moment. Treat yourself and your partner, It's Christmas. Have fun, go sailing.

The very best of luck, hope it all works out for you.

Steve
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Old 18-12-2009, 12:34   #21
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I would stick to a boat that was 10 meters or less (`39') because different coastguard rules apply over that size. The $3500 should be fine. Learning to do repairs is essential. I don't know about sailing lessons as I learned to sail by asking questions and paying attention. $150k for a boat is hard yes you can find a boat but there is the question of how much it is going to cost to bring it up to your standards. Some people say 20% of the value but I think that number is low. I have spent way more than that fixing my boat up and I still need a few more things. New main $4500 new autopilot $5000 (If I install it).

First step is to make sure you like the lifestyle. Get on a charter ASAP. If this isn't the lifestyle that you want it is better to know now.
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Old 18-12-2009, 13:07   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hud3 View Post
You mentioned in your original post that you're interested in Island Packets, and that you want to cruise down to the islands. Here's a suggestion.

At some point in the near future, consider flying down to St. Thomas and chartering a captained Island Packet from Island Yachts in Red Hook (Crewed Charters). That will accomplish several things. You'll get to see what it's like to live aboard an Island Packet, you'll be able to get a handle on the "seasick or not" question, you'll get some hands on instruction from the captain, and you'll get a taste of what it's like to sail in the Lesser Antilles.

BTW, I can highly recommend the Island Packet line for long-term cruising. We owned an IP 380 for seven years, and spent several of those cruising the eastern Caribbean.
Lots of great advice. This one sums it up well.
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Old 18-12-2009, 14:20   #23
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If you don't have any great love of sailing, maybe one of those cruising trawlers might be more up your alley?
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Old 18-12-2009, 15:11   #24
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Well,you guys have really helped put some things in order. I forgot to tell you that I am very cheap, and I can see now that I was putting the cart before the horse or should say the stern before the bow.I feel kinda dumb, I should try it before I buy it. If she throws up all over the pretty blue water this won't work for me, or I'll have to trade her in for a new sea winch. I am surprised that you all seem to think that 150k boat will need a lot of work($$$). I guess you can buy a brand new 38 ft IP and still throw 100 dollar bills at it,most research I have found is that sellers are willing to give some pretty good deals because of the economy. It looks like St. Thomas here I come.Thanks gentlemen...I will report back with the results and I might have a few more questions,you sure are a helpful bunch..
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Old 18-12-2009, 15:25   #25
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Have a great time....January is a great time there.!!..

Don't be wandering too far off the beaten path, in St Thomas....if in doubt ask..
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Old 18-12-2009, 19:30   #26
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<snip> I am 52 years old engaged to a 32 year old gal that has agreed to accompany me on my liveaboard lifestyle that will hopefully be a reality soon. <snip>

<snip>I have no love of sailboats,yet, however I do have a keen interest in living on the water. I am probably wrong, but I feel I can live cheaper on a sailboat and also enjoy life more .


5.I am no diesel mechanic, I don't know a wall socket from a extension cord. No electrical knowledge. No sailing knowledge,No weather knowledge.

6.I am having a hard time creating a orderly plan for all this, I am overwelmed but very determined.

<snip Without directing me to the search engine could you comment on my adventure or misadventure. I am starting to become paralyzed by analyzation of all this.<snip>

A "things to do list" would help. No matter what; I am doing this; if it hairlips the Pope..Any help would be great,including stay on land and forgetaboutit...


ps, anybody want to buy a 2002 Harley Davidson V-ROD, MY COST $20,000.00, will exchange for a high output watermaker, wind generator and solar panels...JUST KIDDING, BUT IT is FOR SELL
I'm not saying this is for you but here is what I would do.

1 - Keep downsizing. Get rid of everything and convert it all to asets.

2 - Get a cheap apartment (smaller the better to simulate boat life) near the water in a location with lots of sailing activity and a good cheap club.

3 - Sail every day, take lessons, hook into the sailing scene.

4 - Preserve your capital for now. With $3500 in cash flow you should be able to take lessons rent the clubs keel boats and learn about sailing.

5 - Start the boat search, talk to owners, salty types etc. Take trips to the islands as Hud suggests and meet cruisers and see how they are doing it.

6 - Keep the bike for transportation for now.

7 - Hang out here and learn about diesel engines and electrics - you'll definitely need those skills.

Slow down to speed up. In one year you will know if you should have a boat or an RV...
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Old 19-12-2009, 00:01   #27
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If it were me I'd buy a cheap boat to begin with. In a few years or so she'll own half of it and be gone, then you can buy your real cruising sailboat and begin your cruising life in earnest.

Most girls who don't know what the cruising life is like probably would not want to live it, especially if they're used to the finer things in life. Come to think of it, you probably wouldn't like it either if you're used to the finer things in life.

Remember, for all those pretty postcards of a sailboat sailing into the sunset, on half of those boats there is a frustrated sailor down below up to his elbows in bilge water, diesel grease, or whatever the problem happens to be, and there always seems to be a problem.
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Old 20-12-2009, 20:01   #28
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close quarters living aboard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by S/V Antares View Post
Tie a 30ft rope to you and your girlfriend and see if you can live with each other for a month.
Shorten the rope,, its more effective.. just remove all sharp objects within reach..
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Old 21-12-2009, 09:09   #29
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I am surprised that you all seem to think that 150k boat will need a lot of work($$$).
Every boat needs some work. If it is not brand new, then there will almost certainly be some maintenance items that need taken care of. Even if it is brand new, you will need to spend money on a variety of things like non-standard sized linens, galley gear, emergency equipment, and so on. The money you spend buying the boat is NEVER the end of it!

Good luck!
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Old 21-12-2009, 09:17   #30
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Tie a 30ft rope to you and your girlfriend and see if you can live with each other for a month.

Yeah, you old dog.
Try living in one room tied together. Dont make hasty decisions.
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