Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 23-12-2016, 08:48   #16
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: PORTUGAL
Posts: 23,486
Images: 2
pirate Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

Quote:
Originally Posted by SV DestinyAscen View Post
Thank you boatman for the laughs!

Do you also enjoy a warm Bovril? I have plenty!
Bovril.. the Lambrusco of spreads.. try once and forget.. the only thing worse than Vegemite..

Quote:
Originally Posted by newhaul View Post
Concerning the Vegemite of marmite argument personally I would rather have a case of spam than either in my galley.
I can tell you've never worked in a meat factory..
__________________


Born To Be Wild.. Click on the picture.
boatman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2016, 02:58   #17
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Caribbean
Boat: Oyster 66
Posts: 1,116
Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

Quote:
Originally Posted by accomplice View Post
If Marmite is a luxury, then you and I have different definitions of luxury
It is not a luxury, it is a dietary staple.
__________________

poiu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2016, 06:16   #18
Moderator Emeritus
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,926
Images: 1
Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goosebumps View Post
.................
............... I would love to hear about the experiences of others who have lived minimum a year on the hook as that qualifies them, in my book, to have real valuable info. ....................
We don't actually meet Goosebumps criteria of remaining on the hook for a year at one length of time, but we have anchored for terms of about three months at a time for 45 years. There are many topics addressed so I'll keep each response as brief as possible.

Customs & Immigration: Our most frequent entry experience is the Bahamas, but there is no one experience. I have cleared customs by arriving from my anchored boat on a sail board with my papers in a zip-lock bag, a smile and a wave .... and we've had a formal search of our vessel by uniformed officers. We comply politely and never have problems.

Community: We like to participate with the communities we visit. We actually have library cards in numerous different ports. We visit local museums, tourist offices and use local services.

Security: We chain & lock our dinghy and bicycles ashore and on our boat. We judge our anchor areas with security in mind and often don't lock our cabins with this judgement about our location.

Life Raft: As coastal cruisers we do not keep a designated life raft, but we keep our dinghy with a quick release option from our davits and a safety ditch bag.

Health Clinics: I recall a couple of events,- food poisoning, emergency root canal & an ear infection. We've always had excellent and inexpensive care in foreign ports.

Choosing anchorage: We don't like to divide the spaces by entering the middle of a pack of anchored boats. We prefer the fringe areas and out of the current so that we will remain facing the wind for a breeze below. Most of the sandy areas in clear water of the islands can be identified as having a deep layer of sand over the hard pan by looking for the ubiquitous holes made by marine worms. In turbid water we are more subject to catching snags or debris. I do keep a trip line on my anchor, but not often a float marker.

Gunkholing: With our 4'3" draft we are often lured up rivers or lagoons to isolated places. We poke about in sand & mud, but not the rock & reef.

Maintenance: I keep a good number of tools and parts aboard as well as an oiless compressor with a 50' air hose to a regulator. As I have a 7KW diesel generator aboard so I can use 110V power at anchor to complete projects and maintain the underwater areas. We once removed the transmission from our Yanmar at anchor and took it to shore by dinghy for repair and then returned it by dinghy to reinstall at anchor. I'm always working on my list of projects whether at anchor or the dock.

Pets: For 13 years we had a great boat dog (schipperke) that would bark at other boats in the Maine fog that we could only see on our radar. I trained this dog as a puppy to leave his product on the aft deck for a quick rinse. I would absolutely not be put in the position of requiring to dinghy ashore for a dog!

Children: We raised our children from newborn to adults on board. It was easy for them as this was the only home they knew. Our daughter now lives on her own boat with her husband and child.

Living space organization: Small space works well, but I can't advise anything here because my wife and I have never lived ashore as adults since small college apartments.

Potable water: We do not have a water maker, but we have enough water tankage to do well for a month without other sources. We have transported water in jugs by dinghy, docked briefly to refill tanks and collected rain water. We often bath in sea water while anchored and then use a small amount of fresh water for rinsing. We never take anything with salt water below!

Food supply: We find local fresh markets and bakeries suitable for us. Buying US brands in foreign ports can be extra expensive.

Food Preparation: We keep a propane range & oven, and electric microwave, fry pan, toaster oven & coffee maker. We time some generator time with cooking and charging batteries. We also supplement our power with a solar panel and wind generator.

Fishing: This just is not a recreational activity for us. We buy locally.

Leaving boat for travel: When we travel away from our boat for more than a week, we rent a mooring or a slip. For stays less than a week at anchor we can keep our refrigerator and freezer running with the wind generator & solar panel. For longer times we empty and turn off our refrig/freezer and we can maintain our anchor light, a deck light and keep our bilge dry. Of course we could not maintain 12v supply for a constant bilge pump need.

We've enjoyed our life aboard since 1972, but with age and some physical challenges, it appears that we will be selling Aythya this next year and moving ashore. .... 'a new adventure for us!
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-12-2016, 07:08   #19
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 18,452
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

living on anchor or mooring is not a rocket science thing--you adapt as you go.
once you have the solar and wind power you find necessary, it is easier to maintain battery charge.
you learn the area in which you are anchored or moored.
a good dink that can hold and transport your provisions and garafones of water--err jerry jugs--- is important unless you wish to take mothership to dock often--it is also important to maintain a functional propulsion system, sail or mechanical.
general questions donot get your answer you seek.
have a great time. it is actually a lifestyle, as opposed to a time.
you will learn which neighbors are trustworthy and which are not.
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-12-2016, 03:01   #20
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: May 2013
Location: East Africa
Boat: catalac 10m
Posts: 354
Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
living on anchor or mooring is not a rocket science thing--you adapt as you go.
once you have the solar and wind power you find necessary, it is easier to maintain battery charge.
you learn the area in which you are anchored or moored.
a good dink that can hold and transport your provisions and garafones of water--err jerry jugs--- is important unless you wish to take mothership to dock often--it is also important to maintain a functional propulsion system, sail or mechanical.
general questions donot get your answer you seek.
have a great time. it is actually a lifestyle, as opposed to a time.
you will learn which neighbors are trustworthy and which are not.
You are very right it isn't rock science to liveaboard BUT that is for us old salts liveaboards on the hook, we get got used to it, actually hits you what great life it is when staying on terra firma for while! The idea to live on the hook is the most scary aspect of sailor cruiser life to most novice sailor cruisers in my experience.
Goosebumps is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-12-2016, 08:28   #21
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 18,452
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

been on board so long land life is a scary freakshow.
stuff of nightmares.
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-12-2016, 08:39   #22
Marine service provider
 
newhaul's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: puget sound washington
Boat: 1968 Islander bahama 24 hull 182, 1963 columbia 29 defender. hull # 60
Posts: 6,457
Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
been on board so long land life is a scary freakshow.
stuff of nightmares.
Not to mention the very real threat of land sickness.
__________________
Non illigitamus carborundum
newhaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-12-2016, 08:50   #23
Moderator Emeritus
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,926
Images: 1
Re: liveaboard on the hook for extended periods of time

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
been on board so long land life is a scary freakshow.
stuff of nightmares.
This is an interesting twist. Maybe much of this is attitude, but I'm motivated by Nancie's physical limitations. We're looking at living ashore as an adventure after 45 years on the boat.

I was looking at the "walk-in" closet where we are moving. It's dark and about the same size as my main cabin. I see possibilities here. 'wandering if there's an electrical outlet in there. ......6" foam on plywood in the corner?
__________________

__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
liveaboard

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advice, How to Maintain Watch & Sail When Solo Thru 24 Hr's. (+) Time Periods ? HighFly_27 General Sailing Forum 153 07-09-2015 17:24
dropping anchor around nanaimo vancouver island for extended periods boatlife Liveaboard's Forum 0 21-07-2012 18:07
Dogs Aboard for Extended Periods? Jim Mc Families, Kids and Pets Afloat 15 18-09-2009 15:00
Logistics of leaving a boat for extended periods of time? scm007 General Sailing Forum 6 03-03-2009 06:32



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:56.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.