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Old 26-10-2015, 12:21   #31
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

Try Shelbourne very nice harbor, and the yacht club there is very friendly. Nice working town. Sailed up there and on to the Bras' dor Lakes 10 years ago. Canadians don't make a fuss of things and they get things done, in my experience. They're darn good neighbors.

Wish they'd make their ENC and RNC charts free like we do!
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Old 26-10-2015, 17:31   #32
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

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Originally Posted by rgleason View Post
Try Shelbourne very nice harbor, and the yacht club there is very friendly. Nice working town. Sailed up there and on to the Bras' dor Lakes 10 years ago.
Sounds great. Here a "drone video" around the yacht club.... nice moorings there, too.


You have been there, hm ? Beautifully place...

Shelburne is on my list, indeed. Its not too far away from Halifx. A two hours ride by car... (Rec.: I suppose my experiences on German Autobahn driving >200 km/h I can store as "memory of the past" in NS. :-) )

Shelburne has an interesting history.... started with ship building more than 130 years ago. A uniquely research vessel was built in the 30th last century, the legendary Blue Dolphine. Its a schooner which was designed by Nova Soctian William James Roué. He became famous having designed the racer BlueNose (which was built in Lunenburg).


A race of Blue Dolphine in October 1931 with the Schooner Gertrude L. is documented by camera in b/w. Impressive... it remembers little bit the "old America's Cupper" of the J-Class. :-) Loveyl...


The great-granddaughter of the designer William Roué wanted to rebuild it by a funding campaign in 2007. Because of some "legal stuggles" and copyright issues she failed to realize Bluenose IV.

By federal government and NS then a completely new boat was built and launched in 2012. - The traditionally boat building techniques of Bluenose II are fully documented on Youtube... very interesting project.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwl...0TFd_5zPm0depQ

Beautiful ship under sails...


The fully act of christening... funny ceremony.


As I like the atmosphere of Universities, learning & research spirit one can breath there I like too the Shelburne Campus, one unity of the NSCC (in total 5 academic schools) with different study programmes in Shelburne:
This is the most impressive for me of NS: it's higher education programme with a huge amount of 10 colleges/public universities in 13 different locations... for a small population of ~1 million inhabitants.
Seems I already lost my heart to NS and Shelburne

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Originally Posted by rgleason View Post
Canadians don't make a fuss of things and they get things done, in my experience. They're darn good neighbors.
yeah... I have that kind of feeling.... more easy going which does not mean they cannot handle tough challenges well. I like that style a lot.

The latest elections showed what Canadians are interested in... not too conservatively... but human oriented. Humanity isnt just a word in Canada so it looks for me. As we noticed from the federal elections one week ago all 11 seats went to the Liberals in Nova Scotia. Canadians dont like it too conservatively these days.

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Originally Posted by rgleason View Post
Wish they'd make their ENC and RNC charts free like we do!
Indeed....
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Old 26-10-2015, 18:06   #33
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

I've been there twice. Once several years after the Shelburne YC was destroyed by a rogue hurricane that missed RI and Cape. Entire club was rebuilt by the members, bigger and better with some great new dockage which you see. The club members are a great friendly asset. There was a fair in town the second time we were there.

The town is small and personal and historic. Some good marine stores for the fisherman. To get there we had to pass "Brazil" (a buoy that was the first mark after crossing the Bay of Maine}.

Bras dor Lake is wonderful too. Very calm and protected, but I think it gets frozen. Don't know what happens in Shelburne.

Saw the Bluenose II at Mystic Seaport, she was going back for more work.
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Old 29-10-2015, 16:37   #34
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Shelburne Harbour mystery sailboat Aura being investigated...

I fell over an interesting article on CBC news which brings up some questions about how Coast guard and Harbour masters are handling legal aspects...

Shelburne Harbour mystery sailboat Aura being investigated
"Pretty big red flags" say RCMP

by Yvonne Colbert, CBC News
Posted: Oct 29, 2015 6:30 AM AT
Last Updated: Oct 29, 2015 5:29 PM AT


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Old 29-10-2015, 16:45   #35
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

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Bras dor Lake is wonderful too. Very calm and protected, but I think it gets frozen. Don't know what happens in Shelburne.
I'd have to check... :-) As short info on the harbour website they say its ice free

Quote:
The Shelburne Marine Terminal (SMT) is located within the public harbour of Shelburne Harbour, Nova Scotia which is the third best natural harbour in the world. The channel, called Eastern Way, leading to the entrance of the Shelburne Harbour is 800 meters wide with a minimum depth of 9 meters through its narrows. The Shelburne Harbour has safe anchorages for vessels in 13 meters of water. The port is ice free and you do not require a pilot to enter the harbour.
I suppose it is the commercially deep water part... no idea how it is with the yacht marina segment of low depth.

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Saw the Bluenose II at Mystic Seaport, she was going back for more work.
Nice... such a ship is the guarantee for 7 days work. :-)
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Old 29-10-2015, 17:02   #36
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

Ice free for commercial boats.

Guy at the club told me it freezes up. They used to have oxen drag granite blocks across the harbor in the winter.

Don't screw up and use the Western entrance around McNutts Island.
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Old 01-11-2015, 16:17   #37
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

Skip JayR - I've lived in Nova Scotia all my life (Cape Breton, and I have family on the 'South Shore' which is what locals call the coast between Halifax and Yarmouth). Here's some perspective:

- most people take their boats out in the winter, because of ice (harbours in cape breton freeze up, not so much on the south shore) and weather (Nor-seaters (cold core cylonic storms that blow up the coast) and winter gales, often with heavy snow and freezing rain). But I see the occasional boat left in the water, so it can be done.

- Shelburne is a beautiful little community. So is Yarmouth, Liverpool, Bridgewater, Mahone Bay, and a bunch of other even smaller communities along that coast.

- Don't confuse what they call a 'Yacht Club' in a small Nova Scotia village, with what you would consider a yacht club in an urban area. They are a collection of people of all ranges of incomes and backgrounds who come together to cooperate to create a facility to support their love of boating. Completely unpretentious. You'll find them inclusive, warm and welcoming, and helpful. (I've stayed in Shelburne twice, they were awesome.) Just call or email the club if you want to know anything specific.

- you are right about the bay of fundy, it's beautiful and unique but a tough place to stay due to the tides.

- The south shore (and eastern shore which is halifax to Canso, for that matter) have an enourmous number of beautiful and unspoiled harbours, inlets, and islands. But in the summer, the water stays cold and fog is common (just like Maine), and if you go outside, you are on the rough tough north atlantic.

- If you keep going ENE to the Bras D'or lakes, you'll find warm water that is essentially fog free. Likewise once you cross through the strait of canso into the Southern Gulf of St Lawrence and Northumberland strait. But the winter is harder there too. So if you winter in the South, you might want to consider cruising in the warmer areas in the summer.

- You will find plenty of Germans in Nova Scotia, most attracted by the low population density (relative to Germany, but NS is actually Canada's second most densely populated province, beleive it or not) and cheap unspoiled land. They are well accepted, although often considered odd because many, in the locals' view, buy 'worthless land' then build fences around it and act somewhat reclusive. (The lunenburg area was settled by Germans around 1750 and you'll see lots of influences such as family names and tancook island sauerkraut)

Laws:

you'll have to deal with the federal government to get appropriate visa etc. Immigration Dept is slow and hopelessly bureaucratic (but you're german so you can probably deal with them better than we can )

Moorings: for the most part, we just put them wherever we want, unless you are in a busier harbour in which case they are regulated by a local harbourmaster

Boating license: you have to have a 'pleasure craft operator certificate'. Started by the Canadian Coast Gaurd to raise revenue through fees when a previous government cut their budget (seriuosly, that's true!). Just basic navigation and safety, you can take a course and write a test online. Not sure if foreigners are exempt.

Liveaboard regulations: Never heard of such a thing, can't imagine there is any such thing in our laws. Once you're here, you;ll uhderstand why. The population density is so low compared that liveaboards are extrememly unlikely to bother anyone at all, let alone enough to fund a political party to pass a law. In fact, people tend to like each other. You'll really notice this when you go ashore - sometimes it can be tough to go anywhere because everyone seems to want to have a conversation and hear your story.
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Old 01-11-2015, 16:26   #38
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

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Old 01-11-2015, 16:54   #39
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Re: legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

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I look for places with "moorings". So I 'd need some orientation about the legal aspects for "living on a boat" along the coast of NS.

Armdale (Halifax) looks fine, indeed. But maybe too expensive (and over crowded).


As I intend to live on a Trimaran in the size of 35 to 45 foot (still searching and yet not bought) with low draft (less than 1/2 meter), e.g. such one...



or such one...

So I look for places with "moorings". The boat shall be independently in maximum, e.g. with Watermaker and Solar.

I dont need a "box" in a marina with electricity.

Actually I thought about the "South East part", down from Halifax anywhere (see upper post). - As I work independently from time and place on board I only need quick Internet speed. Best would be speedy LTE (Wifi) I think all bigger providers (Bell, Rogers etc. ...) offer.

The Bay of Fundy is too heavily with extreme tidals (the biggest in the world I have read). Very impressive indeed but not for a "living on a boat" area as I see it... as I am not too heavily addicted with "wale watching".

I thank you for your support to find out for now which places are "ice free" with moorings and to get informed about all other (legally/financially) aspects around this thematic "(all year) living on board along the coast of NS".
Isn't that 1st trimaran one which is for sale on the wrong coast, to be considering her for living aboard in NS?
Also, & you may know this, but a multihull has a lot more surface area to "bleed heat" than the same length monohull.
That, & many/most of the home built ones don't have much, if anything, in the way of insulation built in.
In addition to having a lot more of the boat, above the water's surface. Where it'll be subject to colder ambient temps than it's immersed bits.

Just my $0.02
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Old 03-11-2015, 06:32   #40
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

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Skip JayR - I've lived in Nova Scotia all my life (Cape Breton, and I have family on the 'South Shore' which is what locals call the coast between Halifax and Yarmouth).
Hello, DoughM ! ... great to know you there. Hope we can see us one day. :-)

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If you keep going ENE to the Bras D'or lakes, you'll find warm water that is essentially fog free. Likewise once you cross through the strait of canso into the Southern Gulf of St Lawrence and Northumberland strait. But the winter is harder there too. So if you winter in the South, you might want to consider cruising in the warmer areas in the summer.
Good suggestion. That sounds great... havent taken this into account yet. :-)

Yes, you are right... for me as German it seems less bureaucracy in Canada. So easy going... Germany is heavily overorganized. Terrible.

Actually we get 7-10,000 refugees daily swapping into this country via Austria/Hungary.... in 2015 it will be 750,000 and till 2016 is to be expected 1.5 million. Alone in Hamburg where I live the town got 35,000 refugees. One can see them everywhere in the city. This country has changed dramatically over last months. Not the fault of the refugees. Its their right to flee away from war zones like syria, Arabian and (North) African countries. After 2nd world war we had 12 million refugees in Germany alone. That way we can say: Germany already is an immigration country.

But with this flood of new immigrants its crazy what is going here these days. Refugees dont have stovens in tents of refugee camps freezing here close to winter... and they must wait till Spring 2016 as government has no capacities to deal their cases, so they are kept on hold hanging all day around doing nothing.

Germany isnt prepared for such uncontrolled immigration, instead we got lots of immigrants in the 60th/70th coming from Turkey, Italy, Greek, Portugal, Spain, Poland which was the basis for that Germany built a very powerful industries with heavily export. Nowadays we miss staff for medical services, teachers, pedagogues in kindergardens. I wonder why cancelor Merkel thinks that such an uncontrolled access for refugees can work. The regularly inhabitants get stressed, more and more aggressivity we see... and more people decide for the ultra right national conservative parties, which are close to the political view of Neo-Nazis.

So these days its a total chaos as the Germans are not used to improvise. As soon they have to leave their orderings principles most are lost. - As soon they loose control over something it ends in big problems. Only the young generation is differently... but over time by aging, they turn into this "bureaucracy thinking", too.

So no, I dont like to meed "typical Germans" anywhere in the world... and not in Nova Scotia. Yes, this "Jagerzaun" (rustic fence) thing is typically German, I suppose it is kind of "fear" they have coming from history (world war 2 and iron curtain/berlin wall).

Even when "the typical German" goes camping, he builds a fence around the camper... isnt that mad ?


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Old 03-11-2015, 16:00   #41
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What is worthfully land in the eyes of a Nova Soctian ?

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although often considered odd because many, in the locals' view, buy 'worthless land'
So let me ask frankly: What is a worthy land in the eyes of a Canadian or specifically for a Nova Soctian ? Do they have some specific parameters ?
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Old 03-11-2015, 16:51   #42
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Re: legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

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Also, & you may know this, but a multihull has a lot more surface area to "bleed heat" than the same length monohull.
That, & many/most of the home built ones don't have much, if anything, in the way of insulation built in. In addition to having a lot more of the boat, above the water's surface. Where it'll be subject to colder ambient temps than it's immersed bits.
I am thinking about the "temperature" aspect, yes. I hvae lived over winter on an aluminium catamaran, it was a very cold winter. So I know about condensation and high heating costs 24hx7d.

Yet I have not found some critical information about living on a trimaran in winter. So maybe it becomes an experiment. :-)

I suppose there is not enough space on a Trimaran for the excellently Danish Refleks heating system which is favorited by many expedition sailboat owners... http://www.toplicht.de/en/shop/ofen-...refleks-oefen-

it has a "mechanical pump system" using alone the princips of passive gravity weight. It needs chimney and minimum a 10 gallon tank for one week/7 days heating.

The benefit of a Refleks: it can be used for heating water, dry clothes and cook on. No electrics and complicated electronics needed.
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Old 03-11-2015, 17:17   #43
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Re: What is worthfully land in the eyes of a Nova Soctian ?

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So let me ask frankly: What is a worthy land in the eyes of a Canadian or specifically for a Nova Soctian ? Do they have some specific parameters ?
I'm not from there but have land there so let me SWAG it and someone check me if I'm wrong.

Worthy land
Flatish
On the water
south facing
NOT been recently clear cut, over 50 years
Spring or stream
Fields for hay
Hard road access, hydro, telephone available.

Now I've seen some land that I could not walk across due to the size and shape of boulders. North facing low land, cold and damp. Sometimes the two above combined. Stumpage, recently clear cut and growing back wild. Saplings so thick you can't crawl through. Deep interior land, no roads, no power.

http://harveyrealties.com
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Old 04-11-2015, 12:24   #44
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Re: What is worthfully land in the eyes of a Nova Soctian ?

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I'm not from there but have land there so let me SWAG it and someone check me if I'm wrong.
for me sounds all very reasonable. Makes sense...

About Cape Breton yet I have not thought about to buy property more looked on the South East coast of NS, 1-2 hours by car Southern of Halifax.

Does one need French language skills for Cape Breton ? I suppose one should be skilled bi-lingual FR + ENG, isnt ?
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Old 04-11-2015, 16:28   #45
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Re: Legal aspects of living aboard in Nova Scotia (Canada)

English is fine.

Parts have a heavy French influence.

Parts are Gallic. Some areas the street signs are English and Gallic.
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