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Old 15-10-2016, 04:09   #31
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Re: Kitchenware

Did someone suggest eating out of a dog bowl? No ... just no. You've got to draw a line somewhere.

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Old 15-10-2016, 09:37   #32
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Re: Kitchenware

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Originally Posted by SVNeko View Post
Did someone suggest eating out of a dog bowl? No ... just no. You've got to draw a line somewhere.
I agree!

I started with plastic plates, cheap cutlery, plastic wine cuppy crappy things that make your wine taste like plasticy crappy stuff.

Now I have nice, hard wearing stuff.
Yes I break a glass now and again but who gives a damn? Just clean it up and get a new glass out. How hard is that?

Boat life is not a regression to primeval life. One doesn't need to do 'one pot meals', that's boring after a few weeks.
Eat of China, drink from glass and get off your butt and cook properly.


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Old 15-10-2016, 10:21   #33
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Re: Kitchenware

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I agree!

Boat life is not a regression to primeval life. One doesn't need to do 'one pot meals', that's boring after a few weeks.
Eat of China, drink from glass and get off your butt and cook properly.


Mark
LOL I agree with Mark, I've lived on one pot meals for years, still do....but almost always served on a glass plate or in a proper glass deep soup cup with a proper handle. Oh, and quality flatware. Beer from whatever it comes in, Mimosa's in a crystal tumbler (always). Coffee in a proper US Navy issue commemorative mug (really thick bottoms, those). This whether I'm living in the desert in Egypt or on a boat. Dog bowl? While it does make a bit of somewhat practical sense, I don't think my dog would like sharing and I ain't getting down on my hands and knees to find out!
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Old 15-10-2016, 10:32   #34
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Re: Kitchenware

We never had a problem with ktichenware rusting, but OTOH we always used fresh water to do the dishes. I think even the expensive stuff will rust if you wash it in salt water and throw it in a drawer.
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Old 15-10-2016, 16:05   #35
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Re: Kitchenware

We have had problems with some expensive kitchenware that was expensive because it had a desired brand name, was heavily advertised, had celebrity endorsements, and was carried in high end retail stores. We have done much better with kitchenware that was well made, well finished, heavy, and sturdy whether bought at WalMart, a restaurant supplyhouse, or a thrift shop. It is hard to guess the grade of stainless (or other materials) that a manufacturer uses, but few manufactures will cut materials costs only to spend them on weight and finish.

We use circles cut from McMaster 86915K24 12"x12"x1/32" adhesive backed silicone rubber sheet stuck to the bottoms of tumblers, plates, and bowls to keep them from slipping around. It is expensive ($27/sheet), but it sticks to the top of a varnished table as well as a silicone face mask strap sticks to your hair. It looks better than silicone caulk, and the adhesive lasts through a couple of years of hand washing. No dog bowls here either.
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Old 15-10-2016, 16:14   #36
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Re: Kitchenware

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Originally Posted by wsmurdoch View Post
We have had problems with some expensive kitchenware that was expensive because it had a desired brand name, was heavily advertised, had celebrity endorsements, and was carried in high end retail stores. We have done much better with kitchenware that was well made, well finished, heavy, and sturdy whether bought at WalMart, a restaurant supplyhouse, or a thrift shop. It is hard to guess the grade of stainless (or other materials) that a manufacturer uses, but few manufactures will cut materials costs only to spend them on weight and finish.

We use circles cut from McMaster 86915K24 12"x12"x1/32" adhesive backed silicone rubber sheet stuck to the bottoms of tumblers, plates, and bowls to keep them from slipping around. It is expensive ($27/sheet), but it sticks to the top of a varnished table as well as a silicone face mask strap sticks to your hair. It looks better than silicone caulk, and the adhesive lasts through a couple of years of hand washing. No dog bowls here either.
We're not doing dog bowls. I'm sure I can find something a little less drastic to use. I do appreciate your good advice on how to prevent items from moving around. Now that I'll try. Lol.
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Old 15-10-2016, 16:15   #37
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Re: Kitchenware

Dog bowls are good when at sea in ruff conditions.

Especially the ones with hole in the side that you can put a finger or thumb in when holding them.


I agree, they are not appropriate for every day use, but they are good to have on passage,
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Old 15-10-2016, 16:27   #38
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Re: Kitchenware

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Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Boat life is not a regression to primeval life. One doesn't need to do 'one pot meals', that's boring after a few weeks.
Eat of China, drink from glass and get off your butt and cook properly.
Depending on where you sail, type of vessel, and type of passage sitting down at a table to eat of china is sometimes difficult, on some passages rarely possible.

In these conditions a plastic, melamine, or some other form of unbreakable bowl is a must. We, or at least I, always eat a proper meal for dinner whatever the conditions. I haven't yet been in conditions where it was impossible to cook but I have often been in conditions when eating the meal was a challenge. This is where a super large mug or a hand-holdable bowl is essential.

Otherwise completely agree that there is no need to regress to plastic or paper.
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Old 15-10-2016, 16:44   #39
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Re: Kitchenware

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Originally Posted by wsmurdoch View Post
We have had problems with some expensive kitchenware that was expensive because it had a desired brand name, was heavily advertised, had celebrity endorsements, and was carried in high end retail stores. We have done much better with kitchenware that was well made, well finished, heavy, and sturdy whether bought at WalMart, a restaurant supplyhouse, or a thrift shop. It is hard to guess the grade of stainless (or other materials) that a manufacturer uses, but few manufactures will cut materials costs only to spend them on weight and finish.

We use circles cut from McMaster 86915K24 12"x12"x1/32" adhesive backed silicone rubber sheet stuck to the bottoms of tumblers, plates, and bowls to keep them from slipping around. It is expensive ($27/sheet), but it sticks to the top of a varnished table as well as a silicone face mask strap sticks to your hair. It looks better than silicone caulk, and the adhesive lasts through a couple of years of hand washing. No dog bowls here either.
For non skid dinnerware, just use white silicone sealant. Put a circle of it on the bottom of the dish/bowl, place it sealant down on wax paper, let it harden. I still have 2 bowls in my cupboard that were done in 1992 this way. Silicone ring still on the bowls!
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Old 15-10-2016, 17:25   #40
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Re: Kitchenware

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Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
Some stainlessware is far better than others. I can taste the bad stuff. Not sure how to tell you to find the right stuff though, but the good stuff usually has very smooth edges etc and shines brightly vs dull.
For pans I like the simple Revere ware, they make a set with extra deep saucepans... nice on tilting stoves! Most 3 burner stoves wont take 3 pans if one is big. Deep helps with that also.
Not had a rust issue with real SS knives.
Vintage Revereware Copper Bottom Stainless Steel 1 1/2 Qt. Sauce Pan W/Lid | eBay
Agreed, I get the same taste problem with cheap SS flatware. It's the cheap stamped crap that's nasty tasting and will rust rapidly. Good quality, no rust, no taste.
Plastic is better than the cheap stuff. lol.
glass baking dish's make great plates also, deeper that dinner plates and look ok. But a nice stainless steel dog bowl sounds rather nice also.
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Old 17-10-2016, 12:42   #41
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Re: Kitchenware

The Admiral loves the Magma stainless - not coated - nesting cookware.(storage space is always an issue on a boat) It pours better than the fancy stuff we had in the house. Found a couple of lids to fit the smallest 2.
A couple of Wiltshire self sharpening knives means there is always a sharp knife to use, the big one is great for cutting bread (and upholstery foam!)
Pressure cooker is a must, saves propane and won't spill.
Commercial grade stemware is pretty robust, hardly ever breaks when dropped, but crystal is a must for champagne and whisky. A sleeve of non-skid material stops them from rattling in rough conditions.
Duralex water glasses for daily use - we hate drinking from plastic.
Corelle is great for dishes although I see a little stoneware has crept on board for special occasions.
Cast iron frying pan (Lodge brand with a short handle fits in the oven for storage and is also great for roasting.)
Spong coffee grinder is better than either electric or the new hand grinders with ceramic burrs. (thanks Lin Pardey ) Find a used #2 on Ebay.
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Old 26-10-2016, 17:20   #42
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Re: Kitchenware

a note about melamine... it is not safe for the microwave. (talked with the Galleyware rep at Annapolis boat show)... so, if you buy it... keep that in mind if you intend to use a microwave.
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Old 27-10-2016, 09:05   #43
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Re: Kitchenware

i use mikasa and copies i find cheap in mexico black spaghetti plates aka soup plates...just enough of a bowl to handle soups and most meals.
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Old 27-10-2016, 09:28   #44
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Re: Kitchenware

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Originally Posted by bcboomer View Post
The Admiral loves the Magma stainless - not coated - nesting cookware.(storage space is always an issue on a boat) It pours better than the fancy stuff we had in the house. Found a couple of lids to fit the smallest 2.
A couple of Wiltshire self sharpening knives means there is always a sharp knife to use, the big one is great for cutting bread (and upholstery foam!)
Pressure cooker is a must, saves propane and won't spill.
Commercial grade stemware is pretty robust, hardly ever breaks when dropped, but crystal is a must for champagne and whisky. A sleeve of non-skid material stops them from rattling in rough conditions.
Duralex water glasses for daily use - we hate drinking from plastic.
Corelle is great for dishes although I see a little stoneware has crept on board for special occasions.
Cast iron frying pan (Lodge brand with a short handle fits in the oven for storage and is also great for roasting.)
Spong coffee grinder is better than either electric or the new hand grinders with ceramic burrs. (thanks Lin Pardey ) Find a used #2 on Ebay.
Thanks bcboomer. Since we are currently hauled out and have emptied the boat of the previous owners things, I am looking for the best ideas for storage, use, and long lasting kitchenware. You've given me a lot to think about and consider.
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Old 27-10-2016, 09:41   #45
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Re: Kitchenware

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Thanks for the wonderful advice.
I've been considering Corelle. And I have Oneida stainless at the house. I have a small slow cooker and pressure cooker also. I think I'll look into the ceramic knives and sharpener. I am considering a wok.
Have decided against ceramic knives after researching.
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Originally Posted by Dbtindale View Post
Thanks for the info Pete. Maybe now my boyfriend will believe me when I suggest/recommend we invest in better quality on some items. I just don't want to waste money on things that won't last. I especially appreciate info from the more experienced liveaboard cruisers. Any suggestions on kitchen items would be helpful.
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Did I say I used to be single



I am still looking for a left hand potato peeler

A pressure cooker is a good item to have on board. We don't use ours much because at home Viv uses a steamer, but I grew up with mum using a PC so have one too.

The one item we need to use more is a slow cooker, its a small 2 people sized item, but at 120w @230v thats about the same power requirements as our solar panels produce so do-able. The larger ones are too power hungry but a small one well that's an option.
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Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
use better quality-- there is a kind her e with pretend silver on it--ha ha ha but we donot have the good sturdy plates. i now have those things ye put under the
paper plates to class em up and make em sturdier
is called corelle. line em with paper for an easier clean up
yup am single and adopted single male habits for dishwashing h ah ah aha ha
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
Dbtindale,

Just take what you need from your home. Everywhere you go, they will have flatware and cookware. I've bought a couple of cookie sheets in a couple of different places in French Polynesia, they're mementos that are useful. Bring your best knives, carving knife (If you eat roasts), bread knife (bread keeps longer if you slice it as you need it), fish filleting knife, paring knife, and actually, a cockpit knife and a boatswains knife. That's probably all you need. We found our cockpit knife in an anchorage, it was a chicago cutlery steak knife someone had lost overboard some time.

We had a friend that bought all her dishes at thrift shops, and changed China plates whenever she felt like it. It doesn't matter that they don't match, just buy things you like.

I've been all over the place with wine glasses, used to buy cheap stemware and replace it as people broke it. Did that for about 15 years, and now I've changed, and usually serve it in small tumblers, it really cuts down on breakage.

Ann

At any rate, YMMV, but that should get you started.
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Dbtindale

I purchased good quality Scan Pans as I did not want to bring my pure copper pans onboard. (I would always be polishing). I use a wok and different sized skillets that all fit into polar tech sleeves and stack. I have a great pressure cooker.

The Correlle ware works wonderfully and living onboard for 20 years I have not broken one piece.

We are not camping so we have glasses for all occasions - stemmed as in wine and champagne, tumbler style for cockpit use and even crystal for port and scotch. Yes we have had a few breakages but a good quality beverage should not be drunk from plastic. (I do have plastic tumblers when entertaining local Pacific Islanders and children). I made polar fleece socks for my glasses and they store in a drawer - the crystal fits in a drawer which my captain added a false shelf with specific cutouts for each glass - takes up more room but protects the crystal.

Purchase the best quality flat ware and it will not rust.

Sharp knives are a must and I have a set of Global knives and I use the recommended ceramic sharpener to hone them.

Enjoy your galley - you spend a lot of time there when cruising and entertaining, sharing and enjoying good company is integral with our cruising lives.

Cheers Sue
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