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Old 18-06-2006, 15:36   #31
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Captjeff, well said. I agree that Catalinas are a great budget cruiser, and extremely spacious below for the size boat.
Thomas. yea yea yea... wise guy. It's called equity.
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Old 18-06-2006, 16:18   #32
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The Catalina's sure are tempting from the price standpoint... and for the live aboard idea, but I haven't been able to put together how not to lose money using one as a stepping stone, from day sailer to liveaboard/inland cruiser to blue water.
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Old 18-06-2006, 18:00   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai Nui
Thomas. yea yea yea... wise guy. It's called equity.
Damn ... I knew I was missing something .. silly me .. I thought it was ...
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Old 18-06-2006, 18:04   #34
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Zach,
The Catalina may be the easiest boat not to loose money with. My first keel boat was a Catalina that I paid $12k for. When I sold her two years later she sat in brokerage for 2 weeks and sold for ... $12k. The trick as I see it is twofold. First know the market for the kind of boat (Catalina, Hunter, whatever they made a bunch of) you are going to buy. Catalinas are everywhere and the market is pretty stable. Look until you find a sound boat that has been ignored for a couple of years and make a below market offer. Be careful because an early 30 will not fetch the price of a later 30 so you have to be model specific in your research. I know a guy who recently bought an early 30 for $10k on an asking price of $22k. Second, every piece of equipment purchased for the Catalina is on my current boat or has been resold. Nothing stayed with the old boat. If you buy a boat that is at the bottom of its market price and add $10k in electronics and refrigeration that money will be lost. The equipment list generally adds nothing to the value. So buy a sound but dirty boat at the bottom of the market and don't add equipment that you can't take with you. You will have to make repairs as stuff wears out but that is just 'tires and oil.' One other thought, few women new to sailing will agree to let her husband buy a boat with a tiller.
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Old 19-06-2006, 03:01   #35
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My wife, Maggie actually prefers a tiller to wheel steering. She’s a “rails-down” sailor, and likes the “feel” of a tiller, when beating hard. I prefer the simplicity of “living with” a wheel.
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Old 19-06-2006, 06:28   #36
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I prefer a tiller on a smaller boat - a wheel on a larger one. Now, that may just be the horse before the cart; thats how most boats are set up, but there may be practicality in that madness.
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Old 19-06-2006, 07:15   #37
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Gord

Wonderful post. I can just add my own personal experience. A few years ago, I got Invictus, a Wauquiez Hood 38 with the express purpose of cruising in what I wished to be an early retirement. It was a tough choice because I could have afforded any reasonable boat, large or small, I wanted...but would have either had to work a few years longer or have less capital to invest for a comfortable retirement.

Before looking and chosing the 'right' boat or a certain LOA, I worked a budget....cruising, retirement, investments ...everything. I then set a specific price level and looked there.

My other considerations were comfort and safety. I wanted a boat that would be comfortable for two with occasional guests but also one I could single hand. A boat that would be very comfy and safe in a seaway but one that would not tire me out handling, or overload me in adverse conditions. Newer enough and in excellent condition so that I would not have to work hard at rebuilding her and every system aboard (any boat is enough work already).

My choice enabled me to retire at 49 and sail her solo down the ICW from Annap to FL. She is most welcoming for guests and ready for a wonderful cruising companion. I can single hand her anywhere in any condition, in any weather ....to include any tough docking or anchoring situation....many of which were encountered during the last trip.

She is, to me, more economical to keep and maintain and not much work to do so. If need be, I can put her on the hard or transport her at not too much expense. I am very happy, comfy and loving life aboard.

Looking out over the mooring field in Stuart FL, I can see about 40 boats. Ignoring the few cats and power vessels, there are perhaps 30 or more sails. Probably 70% are 38ft and under. There are many cruisers and liveaboards here who are very comfy and happy with more modest boats, including many under 30ft LOA. They have lower expenses than I and there were many many times along the ICW I saw smaller boats anchored tucked into little spots I would not attempt ...but wished I could.

As for price. I am comfortable with my choice...but the 50k or more I spent on this boat (than a more reasonable one) results in some thousands in investment income that I will not have.

There is one gentleman here who is cruising on a Catalina 30. His boat looks to be in excellent condition and has new canvas....100% all around, fully enclosed, and probably anything else he wants. I imagine he eats out at the finest restuarants every day and probably gets the fillet mignon. Must be nice.

There is one couple I know who liveaboard a Southern Cross 31. A very nice boat. They have a dog and a large RIB (which they tow, covered, with no problems). He downsized from a 40ft trawler. They are very happy, having a great time and loving life.



My best to all.

John
s/v Invictus
Hood 38
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Old 19-06-2006, 08:12   #38
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I too prefer a tiller. My comment about a wheel was simply an opinion, based on my experience, that selling a boat to entry level buyers is easier when the boat has a wheel.
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Old 24-06-2006, 17:03   #39
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Hi John:

I imagine that just the fuel bill alone would save them a ton of money going from a trawler.
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Old 06-07-2006, 11:18   #40
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At the risk of being flogged and my grog ration taken away I am going to say get the right boat and go. Go small go now may work, but it has to work for both parties if a signifcant other is involved or just yourself. You have to like the boat long term to be happy. It is not just a conveyance, but your home.

In the last few years we have met many cruisers and have become cruisers ourselves. We have learned a few things. Go small and go now is great but if one is not happy( we have met several partnerships break on that point) the enjoyment is lost in the confines of the boat.

Going now can be an awesome experince and it can be a good way to get exposure rather than dreaming. But if you plan on long term you need to be satisfied with the lifestyle of camping or minimalism or get a boat that fits your needs. We enjoy sitting in the outislands not attached to marinas or islands that have cruiser populations. We carry the food, fuel, entertaiment, tools, spares, books, etc that allowed us to stay away from civilaztion and yet do the things we want to do rather than wish we had stuff. We have met several smaller boats passing through because they had to go to the next stop as they were out of something, food, fuel, or water. Yes a large boat will have to go to reprovsion, but we get to carry more and stay out longer.

My wife likes to cook. Not just spaget and noodles but some pretty involved things. We ate better than we did in DC. Cakes, Flan, Cheesecake, just to name a few of the better desserts. The small boat galley wouldn't do it. If she is happy the boat is happier and so am I.

We knew we were going cruising at somepoint and went and found the boat we wanted rather than settling just to get out there. I am positive that if we would have gone smaller and in less comfort my other half would have ended the trip sooner rather than embracing it. But it is her life too and it had to meet her expectations.

Guess what after almost 3 years cruising, not just hanging arund marinas or tourist places WE have decided we love this life style and decided that we would like a bigger boat. We like the cruising life style but we also like some of our old life and want to combine the two.

We are looking at a new Voyage 440 or 500 possibly some other brands just to get the increased space.

Go small but go now, just go with the right boat other wise you may get the cruising experince but it may not become a lifestyle, rather than been there done that what is next.
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Old 07-07-2006, 03:16   #41
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There is several points on this.

To go or not to go cruising for several months?

You can go coastal cruising for $ 10,000 per year having the boat paid for. So you need a boat ready to go cruising. That is fixed up and outfitted so that it does not break on you (within reason). You may also want enough money left over to start a life ashore when you are done. How does your $$$$$ fit? Now we get what size of boat you need to go cruising in a short time slot. Say, less than 5 years.

Can you go crusing on a 26 foot boat or smaller if that was the only way you could go in the next 5 years (and be happy)?

Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh ???????????

One should also note that a % of people will not be happy cruising no matter what size of boat they have.
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Old 07-07-2006, 03:24   #42
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Donna Lange completed the first half of her round-the-world circumnavigation on April 28, 2006. Her 28-foot sloop, “Inspired Insanity”, is now in New Zealand undergoing anticipated rework after 168 non-stop days at sea. Donna's journey will continue in October of this year.

From a solo trans-oceanic cruiser, Donna Lange, as posted at http://www.cruiserlog.com/forums :

Posted - 06 Jul 2006 : 12:20:11
Hi All. So Great to land in KIWI land! So many thanks to so many who helped me get here.
I thought I had responded to this forum but don't see the post. I had answered some of the comments suggesting I didn't have proper gear and communications on board. I did have a satelite phone on board so when both of the SSB receivers went down I resorted to personal weather reports from a mate using Bouy Weather modeling site. I'd give him postions and he'd give me forecasts via text messaging on the Sat phone. It was expensive, but worked great. I was well able to avoid several huge storms because I had good communication. I wouldn't recommend anyone be out there blind.

I am just finishing up a great tour of music and laughter with family and "mates" in New England area and the Virgin Islands. Head back to New Zealand July 9th. I will been blessed with a newer SSB to take back with me. Try again. Got to find a way to get the radios out of waters way. Have to get them away from the sides of the boat. Condensation alone is really trashing the electronics. Water manages to drip off every surface. Picked up a sponsor, MTI Adventure wear(www.mtiadventurewear.com) who are providing Dry suit gear and a new life jacket. My family are all white water slolam kayakers and this stuff is what they wear in the rivers of new england in early spring snow runnoffs. Hoping to finally have a way to stay dry. MTI is trading the use of my music from new CD to use on their website. too Cool!!Have found all gore tex wear to be very poor. Never tried the oceanic stuff. too pricey.

Plenty of work to do to get ready for second leg leaving NZ in November. Getting psyched. Thanks to all the kiwi's giving me so many hands. AWESOME!
Fairest of winds and love, Only Gratitude, Donna

Goto her website: http://www.donnalange.com/pages/1/index.htm
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Old 14-07-2006, 10:10   #43
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To the Catalina owners with the dinette configuration. There is nothing under the dinette. I think it is Catalina Direct (but don't hold me to this) that sells a drawer specifically for this space. I will be getting one. As you know, the dinette model truly sucks when it comes to storage space, especially for simple things like dishes. The space under the dinette would be a good place to keep dishes. You don't need a drawer if you just put a hinged door over an opening, however access inside will be a bit of a pain.

Space for a microwave - this has been a challenge to me, but I have come up with two solutions. 1) In the head, on the forward V birth bulkhead, on the starboard side, I'm thinking of cutting out a rectangle and installing a box, protruding into the V birth, painting it black with some vents to handle a microwave that would be accessible from the head (maybe you could multitask here). 2) I see Force 10 now makes a two burner propane stove with a shelve underneath to take a small microwave. I'm checking up on the dimensions to see if it will fit in the cramped space where the present stove is.
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Old 16-07-2006, 13:30   #44
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Hey rsn48.

Why not build a box next to the galley area. Unless you still have a settee bench/seat still attached to the port bulkhead?

Then I can see why you are thinking of installing a micorwave in another area.
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Old 16-07-2006, 21:31   #45
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GORD, thanks for posting Donna's update. She is now in NZ. She flew over the 4th of this month and is preparing for the second half of her journey. She is an excellent example of go small and go now. She has accomplished some astounding sailing. She started out with little knowledge and outfitted the boat the way she thought she needed to. She learned quickly. She refitted according to her experience. Now, after sailing half way around the globe, she is refitting again. Again, aided by her experience. To the new cruiser, her experience is a lesson. What you believe you need will not necessarily be what you really need. Starting off small and simple will save you in the end.
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