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Old 15-12-2015, 18:10   #16
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrentePieds View Post
...In small commercial vessels...stoves are fixed...
In power boats.
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Old 15-12-2015, 18:17   #17
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

Hey King Dragon of the Sea: 30 meters is 98.4ft, not 81ft.

What kind of boat is she?

Bill
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Old 15-12-2015, 18:24   #18
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

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Originally Posted by TrentePieds View Post
I think it's a fallacy that a gimballed stove can do you any good. You find them only in yachts. In small commercial vessels - where cookie has no choice but to work while underway - stoves are fixed. For good reason. Gimballed stoves are hazards to cookie and to anyone that happens by.
Cooked many meals at sea on gimbaled stoves on small boats. Never lost a pot off the stove and never lost a cook. We did have a safety belt in the galley to hold the cook while the cook's hands were occupied.

One trip in a 36' sailboat we were in 6-10' seas for two weeks and cooked every day. Once or twice we did heave to for a meal. If you're on an offshore passage in a sailboat it's hard to live on crackers every day for 2-3 weeks. You have to cook underway.
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Old 15-12-2015, 18:39   #19
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

I suppose a dual axis is possible, but any fore and aft pitching is momentary, so gimbaling is not needed. Don't overthink this. I have seen a stove gimbaled so the oven door of the stove is pointing aft. Joe Trumbley designed and built it. He wanted that stove amidships and right behind the mast in his 51 footer.
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Old 15-12-2015, 18:53   #20
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

If the sea is rough and cooking is hard to do, just call out for Pizza or Chinese. They will be right there with dinner.LOL Rough sea= bread and cheese.
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Old 15-12-2015, 18:59   #21
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

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Originally Posted by btrayfors View Post
Hey King Dragon of the Sea: 30 meters is 98.4ft, not 81ft.

What kind of boat is she?

Bill
Thanks Bill.... my math was a bit off when doing the conversion: So she is 30 meter = 98.425 196 85 feet

Dragon Prince of the Sea
(technically Agong is King, Raja is some slightly lesser mortal)

She's a traditionally built ironwood-hull, 2-masted Indonesian schooner, known locally as a Pinisi - you can see progress on our FaceBook page (needs a bit of updating, though)
https://www.facebook.com/RajaNagaLaut.Cruises

Attached: pic & 'artist impression'... (or not!)
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Old 15-12-2015, 20:24   #22
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrentePieds View Post
I think it's a fallacy that a gimballed stove can do you any good. You find them only in yachts. In small commercial vessels - where cookie has no choice but to work while underway - stoves are fixed. For good reason. Gimballed stoves are hazards to cookie and to anyone that happens by.



TrentePieds

I don't think it matters given the size of the OPs boat. But I could not disagree with you more strongly.

First a gimbaled stove can easily become fixed with it normally built in locking mechanism.

Second it is hard to fill a casserole dish half way if it is going in the oven, one of the easiest dishes to pre-prepare and throw in during rough weather.

Third if it is a sail boat (let's not turn this into cat versus mono), you don't roll through thirty degrees, most of the time, your roll over 25 degrees and stay within 5 or 10 of that. If it is worse than that, then cheese and crackers it is.

Tens of thousands of offshore racing miles, flattening the boat never an option, crew always fed in the roughest of weather, never seen the cookie worse off than anyone else on board.


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Old 05-06-2016, 16:47   #23
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Re: Gimbled stove: which orientation

It depends where your stove is in the boat. the gimble axis must be the same as the keel. If your stove is on one side, if you use it facing either to the port or starboard it needs to wobble towards you and away with the heel of the boat. If your stove is on or near the centerline, and you use it facing forward or aft, than it must gimble side to side, with a pivot in the center of the front of the stove. Gimbaling a two or three burner stove like this can be annoying because if you set a cast-iron pan on the left burner, you need to pump a kettle half-full of water to set on the right hand burner to compensate for the weight of the pan. Fortunately, a boat with the stove near the centerline has much less need of a gimble as it is actually moving around in space much less. I were re-designing a galley, I would aim for a stove on or near the centerline as an ideal. My stove is near the centerline of my boat and gimbled side to side, but we rarely unlock the gimble. In replacing my stove, I am not even sure I will bother to gimble the new one. All the commercial vessels I have worked on had fixed stoves, near the centerline and we cook in all conditions.
good luck with your project!
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