Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 31-03-2016, 11:56   #61
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Schooner Chandlery's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: home port Washington DC
Boat: SS Crocker design #131
Posts: 977
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by tankersteve View Post
Before I had my own boat/project, I took a week-long sail in the Abacos. The rest of the crew were amazed at my tendency to take the dinghy around the anchorage, chat fellow sailors up, and get a tour of their boat. Same thing in Marinas - most boaters are pretty gracious to show off their homes to someone interested in boat design and layout and just be sociable. However, even when offered the tour, which I almost always took up, I never would open a drawer or peak into anything that was 'closed'. Usually just sitting in the cockpit, getting a good peak into the saloon and seeing the general layout, and enjoying the conversation was enough. I am amazed at the reports of such dumbassery.

Tankersteve
I'd probably be.. amazed is one way to put it ... along with the rest of the crew, too, if you were doing that dingy-round-the-anchorage specifically with a goal of having boat tours. It's nice to have a chat with folks with shared interests--but if the purpose of the chat was to get aboard and experience their boat? hum...

I'm glad you don't open doors and drawers.

You're close to the sort of "other boater" that I'm referring to even though you do not admit to pushing and I'll give you the benefit of your honesty on that you don't push.

Think about it though--if you've decided you're going to live in a particular neighborhood, would you go around asking people there for tours of their homes? If you're clever...um... a good con-man doesn't have to ask, they can get the home or boat owner to open the door and invite you in. But even wheedling an invite is a bit slimy don't you think?

Perhaps you didn't know it at the time but it's not like it's hard to find boats to look at legitimately. There are boat shows and there are tons (tons!) of boat brokers out there and tons (tons!) of boats of all kinds on the market to go look at. There are also owner groups who will talk to you about particular vessels and you can even show up (by arrangement) to some events these boating groups hold.

I adore the broad range of boaters we've met and believe that many of them are super sweet and accommodate pushy people far to easily.
__________________
"The only noble thing a man can do with money is to build a schooner." Robert Louis Stevenson

Schooner Chandlery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2016, 11:59   #62
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Schooner Chandlery's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: home port Washington DC
Boat: SS Crocker design #131
Posts: 977
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by hpeer View Post
We don't get many guests.

Her....
Put some drawers on, we've got visitors.
Me....
Just send 'em down, I need help with the head.
__________________
"The only noble thing a man can do with money is to build a schooner." Robert Louis Stevenson

Schooner Chandlery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2016, 18:35   #63
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,461
Re: Don't open that locker!

Once we are out of "urban cruising" areas and into areas frequented by other non-weekend sailors we change our social behavior. After arrival in a new anchorage, I'll dinghy around and say G'day to anyone I see above decks. This usually evolves into a chat for at least a few minutes, during which time, if not invited aboard, I'll decide if these folks are interesting and compatible (and they almost always are!), and if so, invite them around for a 'cuppa'. When they arrive, they will be welcome below if that is weather appropriate. This visit may or may not involve a 'boat tour"... but never has anyone done the invasive things mentioned in this thread. Maybe this is because my initial evaluation of new acquaintances has weeded out such jerks before the fact, I dunno. Of course, when we are the "old boat" in an anchorage, we will go around to meet new arrivals if they don't make the move first. When they do make the first visit, I'll chat briefly a nd if there are no contra-indications, invite them aboard for a longer conversation. Usually a pleasant experience IME.

Actually, I thought that this was pretty common cruiser behavior... the going around to meet new folks. When one moves about a lot, one's social life is pretty dependent upon making new friends quickly, and most cruisers do so routinely... and inter-boat visits are part and parcel of this. I can't imagine cruising without it! To compare this activity with going around a residential neighborhood on dirt makes little sense to me... apples and cucumbers... completely different situations.

So, all you CFers, if you see Insatiable II at anchor, come on by... we'll be friendly and if you ask nicely, we'll let you look in our sock drawer. You may have to move a layer of shackles and spare clevis pins to get down to the socks, though!

Jim
__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2016, 21:07   #64
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Once we are out of "urban cruising" areas and into areas frequented by other non-weekend sailors we change our social behavior. ..................
.................................... Actually, I thought that this was pretty common cruiser behavior... the going around to meet new folks. When one moves about a lot, one's social life is pretty dependent upon making new friends quickly, and most cruisers do so routinely... and inter-boat visits are part and parcel of this. I can't imagine cruising without it! ............... Jim
We make a similar shift in behavior and sometimes find ourselves anchored near some one we've met before. We also find ourselves spending far more time in our cockpit at anchor, while at the dock we're most often below.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2016, 21:22   #65
Registered User
 
Mike OReilly's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Good question
Boat: Rafiki 37
Posts: 4,034
Re: Don't open that locker!

What Jim says
__________________
Why go fast, when you can go slow.
BLOG: www.helplink.com/CLAFC
Mike OReilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2016, 21:26   #66
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Schooner Chandlery's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: home port Washington DC
Boat: SS Crocker design #131
Posts: 977
Re: Don't open that locker!

Jim and Hudson -- it is common behaviour to go 'round welcoming new folks to the anchorage and making sure we all know one another especially in case someone might need a bit of help later on. Always good to know the neighbors. We find that once outside the urban areas (as you say...and that's a good/fitting turn of phrase) the problem boaters we've been talking about tend to, well, not be there. All the more reason to be at anchor rather than at a dock.

And--yes we tend to stay belowdecks if we're at the dock (so we don't get approached so much) whereas we tend to be in the cockpit or at least up in the charthouse when at anchor.
__________________
"The only noble thing a man can do with money is to build a schooner." Robert Louis Stevenson

Schooner Chandlery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 04:27   #67
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Wisconsin
Boat: Sabre 426
Posts: 13
Re: Don't open that locker!

Back in the late 60's we had our Newporter tied up at the wharf in Manistee, MI in Northern Lake Michigan. This was way before there were any municipal marinas or any yachting facilities. The dock watchers were the towns people that came down to see the "big sailboat" because back then few if any boats showed up in Manistee.

We were there because we were having engine problems and ducked in to Manistee to sort it out. It was a recurring problem we had since we owned the boat. Basically the diesel would refuse to to start after a long sail.

So we are tied up and my dad is sitting in the cockpit with his head in his hands, the floor boards are all brought up in the after cabin exposing the engine. Mom and us 6 kids are just trying to stay out of the way. My dad frustrated at the situation with the engine not knowing what to do when a young couple strolling the dock stopped and tried to make conversation about our boat. My dad normally a personable guy (being a physician) was not in any mood and told the guy that we were having engine problems and he was not inclined to chat.

Well the guy, his name was Gus, said that he was a diesel mechanic and would be happy to take a look at it. My dad thought about it and said sure, mind you this is after numerous tows and trips to Palmer Johnson in Sturgeon Bay, WI (where we bought the boat) PJ's worked to troubleshoot it many times but never solved the issue. My dad was so frustrated that even a shot in the dark with Gus could not hurt.

So Gus came aboard and sat on the step in after cabin and my dad described how the engine would not start after a long sail. Gus looked at the engine for about 10 minutes, not touching anything, and then told my dad what the problem was. He told him that because it was a gravity fuel system with a mechanical fuel pump coupled with the location of the fuel tank, the engine would lose it's prime when heeled for an extended time. The solution was to install an electric fuel pump that would prime the engine prior to starting.

Gus told my dad he could get the pump and make up the lines that week once everything was open (it was the weekend). So later in the week Gus showed up and he drove us to his shop to get the pump and new lines. (interesting at his shop Gus was building a 30 foot power cat with water jet engines)

Took them about an hour to install the new parts and since that time, every time you turned the key, you would hear the click click click of the fuel pump and we've never had a starting problem again.

After it was done we took Gus and his girlfriend out for a day sail as a thank you.

So you never know just who is walking those docks
__________________
dp1404 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 07:59   #68
Registered User
 
Juho's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Finland
Boat: Nauticat 32
Posts: 717
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dp1404 View Post
Back in the late 60's we had our Newporter tied up at the wharf in Manistee, MI in Northern Lake Michigan. This was way before there were any municipal marinas or any yachting facilities. The dock watchers were the towns people that came down to see the "big sailboat" because back then few if any boats showed up in Manistee.

We were there because we were having engine problems and ducked in to Manistee to sort it out. It was a recurring problem we had since we owned the boat. Basically the diesel would refuse to to start after a long sail.

So we are tied up and my dad is sitting in the cockpit with his head in his hands, the floor boards are all brought up in the after cabin exposing the engine. Mom and us 6 kids are just trying to stay out of the way. My dad frustrated at the situation with the engine not knowing what to do when a young couple strolling the dock stopped and tried to make conversation about our boat. My dad normally a personable guy (being a physician) was not in any mood and told the guy that we were having engine problems and he was not inclined to chat.

Well the guy, his name was Gus, said that he was a diesel mechanic and would be happy to take a look at it. My dad thought about it and said sure, mind you this is after numerous tows and trips to Palmer Johnson in Sturgeon Bay, WI (where we bought the boat) PJ's worked to troubleshoot it many times but never solved the issue. My dad was so frustrated that even a shot in the dark with Gus could not hurt.

So Gus came aboard and sat on the step in after cabin and my dad described how the engine would not start after a long sail. Gus looked at the engine for about 10 minutes, not touching anything, and then told my dad what the problem was. He told him that because it was a gravity fuel system with a mechanical fuel pump coupled with the location of the fuel tank, the engine would lose it's prime when heeled for an extended time. The solution was to install an electric fuel pump that would prime the engine prior to starting.

Gus told my dad he could get the pump and make up the lines that week once everything was open (it was the weekend). So later in the week Gus showed up and he drove us to his shop to get the pump and new lines. (interesting at his shop Gus was building a 30 foot power cat with water jet engines)

Took them about an hour to install the new parts and since that time, every time you turned the key, you would hear the click click click of the fuel pump and we've never had a starting problem again.

After it was done we took Gus and his girlfriend out for a day sail as a thank you.

So you never know just who is walking those docks
That's what the world should look like.
__________________
Juho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 09:11   #69
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Texas, USA
Boat: Jeanneau 44DS
Posts: 239
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dp1404 View Post
Back in the late 60's we had our Newporter tied up at the wharf in Manistee, MI in Northern Lake Michigan. This was way before there were any municipal marinas or any yachting facilities. The dock watchers were the towns people that came down to see the "big sailboat" because back then few if any boats showed up in Manistee.

We were there because we were having engine problems and ducked in to Manistee to sort it out. It was a recurring problem we had since we owned the boat. Basically the diesel would refuse to to start after a long sail.

So we are tied up and my dad is sitting in the cockpit with his head in his hands, the floor boards are all brought up in the after cabin exposing the engine. Mom and us 6 kids are just trying to stay out of the way. My dad frustrated at the situation with the engine not knowing what to do when a young couple strolling the dock stopped and tried to make conversation about our boat. My dad normally a personable guy (being a physician) was not in any mood and told the guy that we were having engine problems and he was not inclined to chat.

Well the guy, his name was Gus, said that he was a diesel mechanic and would be happy to take a look at it. My dad thought about it and said sure, mind you this is after numerous tows and trips to Palmer Johnson in Sturgeon Bay, WI (where we bought the boat) PJ's worked to troubleshoot it many times but never solved the issue. My dad was so frustrated that even a shot in the dark with Gus could not hurt.

So Gus came aboard and sat on the step in after cabin and my dad described how the engine would not start after a long sail. Gus looked at the engine for about 10 minutes, not touching anything, and then told my dad what the problem was. He told him that because it was a gravity fuel system with a mechanical fuel pump coupled with the location of the fuel tank, the engine would lose it's prime when heeled for an extended time. The solution was to install an electric fuel pump that would prime the engine prior to starting.

Gus told my dad he could get the pump and make up the lines that week once everything was open (it was the weekend). So later in the week Gus showed up and he drove us to his shop to get the pump and new lines. (interesting at his shop Gus was building a 30 foot power cat with water jet engines)

Took them about an hour to install the new parts and since that time, every time you turned the key, you would hear the click click click of the fuel pump and we've never had a starting problem again.

After it was done we took Gus and his girlfriend out for a day sail as a thank you.

So you never know just who is walking those docks


What a great story. We needed this to balance out all the crazy stuff in these two threads.
__________________
Garrettw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 09:55   #70
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,317
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dp1404 View Post
mind you this is after numerous tows and trips to Palmer Johnson in Sturgeon Bay, WI (where we bought the boat) PJ's worked to troubleshoot it many times but never solved the issue.

So Gus ................told him that because it was a gravity fuel system with a mechanical fuel pump coupled with the location of the fuel tank, the engine would lose it's prime when heeled for an extended time. The solution was to install an electric fuel pump that would prime the engine prior to starting.
thread drift

Pretty common problem which goes to show how bad a lot of marina service people are.
__________________
jobless, houseless, clueless, living on a boat and cruising around somewhere
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 10:14   #71
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Schooner Chandlery's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: home port Washington DC
Boat: SS Crocker design #131
Posts: 977
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juho View Post
That's what the world should look like.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrettw View Post
What a great story. We needed this to balance out all the crazy stuff in these two threads.
Well, he did say it was a long time ago before recreational marinas and yachts were so common. Things have changed.

We did have a really nice fellow visit us when we were staying at the visitors' dock of a marina where the boat used to "live" for a couple decades. That visitor gave us an old fashioned galley hand pump that had once been in the galley of our boat and that the previous owner of our boat had thrown out. This nice fellow saw our boat and came down asking "how long are you here for?" and said he had something for us. He brought us the pump the next day. Sweet of him. We have it aboard but haven't re-installed it since we had just put in a Davey hand pump in the galley during our rebuild of the boat. Someday we'll install it though.

Unlike the diesel repair fellow of long ago, the workman story today might be more along the lines of an experience we had in April 2013:

We'd sailed back down from San Francisco to San Diego so we could watch a friend participate in an intercollegiate rowing competition being held in San Diego. Any excuse to sail 600 miles right? LOL.

As members of a military sailing club, we had reciprocal yacht club privileges at several San Diego YC's. The folks at the YC's tend to be very nice -- and a free slip for a few days is always a good thing. We'd just pulled into a slip at SDYC and were sitting in the cockpit relaxing when a fellow came by asking questions about the boat.

We were friendly, he was friendly. Then came the angle. He pointed at our (very well serviced and nicely functioning 30+ yr old 3 speed Barient 32) jib sheet winches w/o self-tailing and said that we'd need new winches before we did much more serious sailing--and he had a great deal (of some thousands of dollars) on some self tailing winches for us. We said thanks but we like keeping/using at least vintage stuff (if not as old as the boat) on our pre-WWII boat.

In 2009, we were lucky to have a master rigger (who works at a maritime museum) advise and supervise our re-rigging and I had a rigger from a different maritime museum assist me with learning how to properly perform eye splices in the new 1x19 standing rigging we installed then. Many people compliment us on the splices. This fellow didn't. Instead he got a little more serious and said that we needed new rigging and he could do it for us. We thanked him but said the rigging was done in a traditional manner but it was actually new with only a couple thousand miles of sailing on it.

He was starting to get a little upset because we weren't jumping on his offers of help. We thanked him for his outreach but said we had it covered as we were such DIYers and oh wasn't it a lovely afternoon? Changing the subject onto something benign seemed a good idea.

Rather than turn the conversation away from what he could do for us, recognizing he was losing his sale and it was probably unrecoverable, he then went into a serious criticize mode.

At the time, the fixed end of the lower part of our running backstays (that we mostly use in the belt-and-suspenders fashion that cruisers do while running or in heavy weather) included a 3 part seizing like this (but also around a cast eye) that our master rigger friend had advised would work well indefinitely but also allow us to use the particular line (Endura Braid Classic which is dyneema under a poly sleeve that looks like a traditional braid in a classic cream color) in a different way once some custom blocks with beckets could be made for the running backs. So--the fellow looked at the seized line and started in on how amateur it was, it was surely stretchy (hum, guess he doesn't know Endura Braid Classic is really dyneema underneath...) and then pointed at the spliced lower eyes on the main shrouds stating he didn't know how we expected to leave the harbor with things like that and we'd be asking for his help soon enough once we realized we needed what he said we did and he stalked off.

That's more of the way it is these days. We felt safe in the haven of a YC where we thought it was unlikely that we'd be accosted by Looky Lous, vendors, or others. In general the YC are as safe from rude folks as the remote anchorages are. Not quite sure how that vendor got in.
__________________
"The only noble thing a man can do with money is to build a schooner." Robert Louis Stevenson

Schooner Chandlery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 12:16   #72
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
Re: Don't open that locker!

Schooner Chandlery, As a vendor of marine products and services yourself, you likely have a heightened insight to the activities of vendors. I rarely take notice of them. Maybe I'm less likely to be approached by vendors because of my modest vessel. I never have any difficulty turning down an offer.

I do interact with other boaters at docks and I often share progress with current projects, materials and ideas,- theirs and mine. I'm almost 100% DIY, but when I do hire a professional, as I did recently, it's almost always another boater that I know beyond their work. I recently had a new prop replacing the old one pulled off and the cost of the professional was far less than me buying the puller or desiring to store another tool.

I buy some parts and materials and search techniques online, but locally I find the support I need by word of mouth and other liveaboards or boaters on the docks.

I've heard of people scheduling work through boatyard services to be done by people known a "riggers, mechanics, detailers, or marine specialists". I only had such a titled person work on my boat three times in over forty years. This was always because I was unable to remove some part to take to a shop. - 'new engine install, some stainless steel bow work, and that prop replacement. (There's probably a fourth for something I don't remember)

Oh, back to who's opening that locker,- that would be my friend from down the dock who is aiming a flashlight down there so I can see where I'm hanging upside down from another locker with wrench and a mirror. When we finish I'll be hauling him up his mast.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 13:07   #73
Senior Cruiser
 
hpeer's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Philadelphia
Boat: Murray 33-Chouette & Pape Steelmaid-44-Safara-both steel cutters
Posts: 3,900
Re: Don't open that locker!

Maybe it depends upon where you sail. I find things old school in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Met a couple of good old diesel mechanics. Most films are polte to a fault. Did have a bit of a nervous time in Quebec once with a couple of drunk guys from the reservation. I was firm and they went away.

All in all sailing in NS beats the hell out of driving in Philladelphia.
__________________
hpeer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 14:03   #74
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Schooner Chandlery's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: home port Washington DC
Boat: SS Crocker design #131
Posts: 977
Re: Don't open that locker!

I wish I were sailing in NS--or even driving there! We love it there.
__________________
"The only noble thing a man can do with money is to build a schooner." Robert Louis Stevenson

Schooner Chandlery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2016, 14:56   #75
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Schooner Chandlery's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: home port Washington DC
Boat: SS Crocker design #131
Posts: 977
Re: Don't open that locker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudson Force View Post
Schooner Chandlery, As a vendor of marine products and services yourself, you likely have a heightened insight to the activities of vendors.
Hudson Force--we're actually DIY boaters (like you) and computer geeks. The Schooner Chandlery is a nautically themed marketplace (think Amazon or Etsy) for makers with nautically themed wares. So--we love all the various things our sellers sell, but we're just the folks making the marketplace happen online.

That particular fellow, a self-employed rigger I suppose, was just looking for his next mark.
__________________
"The only noble thing a man can do with money is to build a schooner." Robert Louis Stevenson

Schooner Chandlery is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Charts don't open, New PC Windows 8 emenskl OpenCPN 14 29-07-2013 19:07
Chain Locker Drain and Rode Spool inside Locker resilientg Construction, Maintenance & Refit 3 05-08-2012 19:02
Open CPN wont open BONEY MAHONEY OpenCPN 3 26-07-2012 22:08
Open CPN Works Initially But Then Will Not Open GrahamW OpenCPN 4 25-01-2012 05:57
Open cpn Installs but Does Not Open with Vista 64 bit felipe OpenCPN 3 03-06-2011 13:23



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:44.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.