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Old 20-11-2009, 09:15   #16
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Originally Posted by Sailmonkey
the guy next to me got a 31' hunter, clean, ready to go... As one would expect it needs sails and some running rigging.
No offense, but I would certainly not call a boat that needs sails and running rigging "ready to go."
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Old 20-11-2009, 09:46   #17
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The sails and running rigging are servicable. I know there are always the magazine ad people who fear for life and limb and want the newest and best. This particular boat has the original sails that have sailed well so far in coastal blows (what the original discussion was) and the running rigging, while dry and dirty, works just fine.
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Old 20-11-2009, 10:28   #18
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In the past 2 or 3 weeks I have seen signs at a local marina advertising slips available. The first time I've seen slips advertised here in Newport Beach, CA since I moved here in 1984.

In southern Cal it is not unusual for waiting lists to be 2 or more years - longer for liveaboard.

I suggest you immediately start looking for a slip. You'll probably have plenty of time to find a boat after getting on a waiting list for a slip.
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Old 20-11-2009, 11:33   #19
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One of the more hidden cost is the necessity of fixing things faster when they break on the boat. Many of the systems on your boat are fairly important for comfortable living. Your water pump goes out, no shower, dish washing, etc. Toilet goes out, hike up to the one ashore in the middle of the night, or can we say slop jar! Inverter goes out, maybe no lights or charger for the laptop. It seems like when something breaks, and they do, I have to fix it now, not wait to the weekend. I have to go to Westmarine and get the part now, not from the internet in a week. This can significantly add to cost. In a house, it seems I can defer more things, or call someone and they'll be out to fix it soon. Oh the boat, not as easy.
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Old 20-11-2009, 11:55   #20
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I have been away from the Southern California boating scene for a number of years; however I remember a loose organization called the "Long Beach Single Sailors". It was a great organization. There was a wealth of information there. Good Luck
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Old 22-11-2009, 10:37   #21
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Thanks for all your helpful information! I truly appreciate it. I don't have to worry too much about other guys checking me out unless they swing that way...haha...What kind of maintenance would I be needing? I have read about someone coming in to clean the underside of the boat twice a month. What is the reasoning for that and also what other similar routine maintenance is necessary.
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Old 22-11-2009, 11:30   #22
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Costs to consider..

Hi Lucky. In 1991 I finished my Master’s degree, and decided it was time to jump into sailing feet first. I began crewing on a local race boat and looking at possible liveaboards. I bought an Islander 30 in and moved aboard in December. She wasn’t terribly flash (no reefer) but had basic systems in good condition (16 HP Yanmar, VHF, propane stove with oven, good sail inventory) etc. I think I paid about $20,000 for her, had bank financing for a few years and paid it off as soon as I could.

The only major problem I had in 10 years of ownership was rot at the base of the mast. The mast had been replaced by the previous owner after a dismasting and wasn’t draining properly, so water built up inside the mast and eventually got into the coach roof underneath. By then I had met my husband, and we were able to remove the mast ourselves using his taller rig, and repair the area. He did initially try to pick me up one hot afternoon after I had been rebedding deck hardware, and I wasn’t too friendly (it might have gone better had he offered me a cold beer!). But he was willing to give me another chance when I offered to crew on his race boat, and well, things took off from there.

I was really glad I did this, and I hope you will be too. Buying a very simple boat will keep both your initial costs down as well as future costs and frustration. A smaller boat may not go as fast, but you are more likely to be able to handle all the tasks yourself even in rough conditions. I learned a lot by crewing on raceboats. Helping with maintenance allowed me to learn how to do more things on my boat. When I needed help with more technical tasks, I could ask for advice, be better informed when dealing with tradesmen, and occasionally call in a favour. It was so great on long summer evenings (and some brisk winter days!) to round up some friends and take the “house” out for a sail in the evening thermals.

Eventually, the hubby and I sold up our two separate hulls, bought two that are connected (our catamaran Cheshire), and sailed off to the South Pacific. Who knows where your sailing dreams will take you?

Cheers!
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Old 26-11-2009, 18:28   #23
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One does not have to be a sailor to be a live aboard. The boat choice is up to what your heart desires - some like it with sails, others without.

Living aboard vs. living in a house sucks, I mean, it is way more comfortable to live in a house.

Cost may be lower or higher - depending on the size of the boat and the marina fees in your area. Initial investment is lower though - you may pick up a boat for 5 fix it for another 5 and you cannot buy a house for 10k, can you.

Maintenance is low, unless you use the boat for other purposes than housing.

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Old 26-11-2009, 19:05   #24
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Wow thanks for all the input! Right now I am trying to settle all my finances and possibly look into renting for 6 months to make sure it is something I really want to do. But as far as I know I would love it. Thanks everyone! BTW Happy Thanksgiving.
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Old 26-11-2009, 20:38   #25
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You might be able to rent a houseboat, but I'd be surprised if you could RENT either a powerboat or sailboat with the intent of living aboard it, let alone rent it for six months. A six month charter would be damned expensive, most charters are for under two weeks and if you want more than that, it becomes a most unusual transaction for small craft.

You might do better looking only at boats that are very popular models with fairly easy (fast) resales, then simply gamble on buying it on selling it again when the time comes. A popular model, kept CLEAN, will be much easier to resell than some odd cheap boat, or even a more expensive one at the higher end of the market.
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Old 27-11-2009, 16:09   #26
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A houseboat. Yes! I will retire on one ;-)

In our marina there is a flat bottom thingy called 'Gibbson'. I love it - it has a sunroof, a veranda, a yard (a.k.a deck) and enough space inside to have a studio and an office (plus two VP engines that alone are worth the asking, I guess). If not for my limited budget ....

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Old 07-12-2009, 11:25   #27
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Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
You might be able to rent a houseboat, but I'd be surprised if you could RENT either a powerboat or sailboat with the intent of living aboard it, let alone rent it for six months. A six month charter would be damned expensive, most charters are for under two weeks and if you want more than that, it becomes a most unusual transaction for small craft.

I see liveaboards for rent occasionally on the Seattle craigslist. Never sailboats though. Always seems to be a mid-30 foot powerboat.
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