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Old 20-02-2013, 20:32   #16
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

Greatly appreciate your feedback. I haven't actually spent the money on the surveyor yet. His cost and the cost to haul out are getting close to 10% of the cost of the boat ($1088 survey, $200 haul & wash, around $150 swag for fastener removal/replacement). So, if I pay the survey and find alligators, I've lost a bit of nonrecoverable change. There is no chance of me skimping on the survey. I want a detailed woody guy and think I found him. He's offered an engine surveyor haven't decided yet.

So, here is what I know:
limber holes fore and aft of the engine and 2 ribs aft show soft approx 1/8" depth for about 1.5" diameter near limber hole radius. Visual inspection to me looks like rot, but I don't have a clue what I'm looking at. No weaknesses noted by me in planking from inside engine room.

underway, I wanted to do a visual inspection of planking and ribs, the engine room was full of a smoke that smelled like oil burning. Owner is listed through a broker, but we've had a few discussions. He stated he replaced the riser and may have dripped some sealant that could be burning off. I'm a little skeptical. Also, seems there should be a blower in there and maybe the surveyor will find it, but I didntnsee it.

All of the wood topside needs "tlc" the britework broke my heart. A lot of the paint is chipped or cracked and needs to be feathered or stripped and replaced.

The engine is original Lehman 130 hp with 2300 hours.

I know of no local covered public moorages here at all.

So, do I pay the survey, try to pull the price down maybe another $5-8k and enjoy a summer of.orbital sanding fun on my temporary home or do I go look for an apartment until I find some thing else I love. I certainly haven't aeen everything in my area, but at a budget of $50k, after I sell my cuddy, there isn't much in power boats that tugs at my heart.

one more time, thanks.
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Old 20-02-2013, 21:15   #17
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

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The boat was surveyed, folks.
My bad. I misread the OP when he was talking about retaining a tough surveyor in the first post.

By all means, BigRalph, have this boat surveyed. A good surveyor will know all about fasteners, rot, and cooties.
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Old 21-02-2013, 07:11   #18
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

If you want to spend your time sanding and polishing wood on the hard, go for it. If you want to be out on the water fishing, swimming, and diving, get yourself a sturdy cheap fiberglass work boat.
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Old 21-02-2013, 08:51   #19
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

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If you want to spend your time sanding and polishing wood on the hard, go for it. If you want to be out on the water fishing, swimming, and diving, get yourself a sturdy cheap fiberglass work boat.
Intersting. I think you might be being a little sarcastic, but actually I'm interested in both. I love being on the water, but even though I'm a complete novice I have a lot of woodworking equipment and I love the smell of saw dust. Really. So, I'm in a weird place personally and the whole live aboard, restoration, powered sailing would be very good for me. Kathartic?

Here's the lady: http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1967.../United-States
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Old 21-02-2013, 09:46   #20
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

This one might break your budget it's $75k but these boats go regularly for 100K plus

Restored Monk 36 - $75,000 - (New York, NY)

Back to Search Results Posted 1 month ago



Priced to sell! We have lovingly restored our 1983 Monk 36 from the keel up. All systems gone through, foredeck and aft bridge deck recored with synthetic coring (will never rot!), topsides all painted, no interior water damage and no leaks, only 1,900 hours on her 135hp Perkins 6.534 diesel engine, 350 hours on her newer Northern Lights 8.0KW generator with sound shield, upgraded electrical, new Raritan "Marine Elegance" head in master stateroom head (freshwater electric/vacuum flush- WAY better than vacuflush), granite countertops and new appliances, the list goes on. Over 100 pictures available. She is an absolutely fine example of the classic Monk 36 trawler and way better quality than brands such as albin, marine trader, kha shing, CHB, grand banks (no teak decks on a Monk!), or production boats such as carver, sea ray, regal, chaparral, monterey, four winns, or others. Priced to sell and truly ready to go. You will not be disappointed in this boat! Can be cruised anywhere in the world under her own power from where she is currently docked on the TN River or can be easily transported over land without any problems.



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Old 21-02-2013, 10:06   #21
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

Here are more pics on Yachtworld

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Old 21-02-2013, 10:23   #22
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

This could be a great boat. A few questions. I know that you had her surveyed, but does that include an engine survey? You really want to be sure that all the mechanical and electrical systems are in top shape, otherwise there could be significant hidden costs. While I also really like fiberglass hulls (because there is a lot less maintenance issues) a well fastened wooden hull is very appropriate. I owned a Seahorse 31 for several years and really loved it. If this boat doesn't work out, there are lots of similar boats out there. Good Luck!!
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Old 21-02-2013, 10:42   #23
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

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This one might break your budget it's $75k but these boats go regularly for 100K plus
Yes, my top, after cuddy is gone, is $50K. If I knew I'd be aboard in 2 years, maybe I'd spend more, but that's not the long range plan.

Someone asked me my dream boat - I don't know. I'm to new to this. 26' is too small 40' seems way too large. 2 Decks seems good, 3 decks seem daunting. Sail isn't an option for me, since I have no experience. I want a project, but not an anchor tied to my neck (and wallet)g. Mostly, I want to learn and have something that connects me to the outdoors.
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Old 21-02-2013, 11:17   #24
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Turn around & walk away, wood boats are beautiful but will consume all your time & $$$$ to maintain.
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Old 21-02-2013, 13:23   #25
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

Firstly my suggestion is never fall in love with boat before buying her - you don't know her and it clouds your judgment.
Secondly as much as anything the previous owner's attitude and treatment of her count. You are continuing on from him and if he was broke and lazy or vv it comes on to you.
Three don't underestimate the costs and time boat repairs take double or triple them although it sounds like you can do a lot yourself.

I am not an expert on wooden boats but they are regarded with less fear in NZ than in the US. FG has issues too osmosis soft decks etc. It depends how the wood boat was made. There is probably a Grand Banks users forum.

Two points I do know are that it is fresh water that causes rot ie look for leaks, and paint protects. Peeling paint isn't a good sign of care but at least the wood can be checked with a fine awl.

Check the wear on the teak decks specifically the depth gauged by any screws apparent. They are expensive to replace and some wise people consider them a deal breaker.

If after doing what ever checks you can getting a wood boat surveyor is wise, as you are, and the cost warranted.

You can renegotiate after. Check the asking prices and condition of other examples of the same boat. I can't imagine this seller is swamped with buyers.

You might also find the wooden boat forum helpful.

I don't know Vancouver weather but I imagine it snows. Maybe people store their boats because they won't be using them. You would have the issue probably of water lines possibly or probably freezing but you could maybe work around that.

As for reactions against a trawler. Well it suits some especially for a liveaboard. Yes it will be slow compared to a fizz boat, but a lot of sailors would be happy to do 6.5 knots direct without tacking, consistently and I doubt most smaller yachts do that. Fuel economy helps - faster costs more so do sails and rigging.

Having a bit of a project at this point may help you, and saves money spent on women etc. Next year who knows but I would prefer a bit longer time frame myself.

Good luck whatever you do.
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Old 22-02-2013, 13:09   #26
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

I grew up on the water, working on and sailing wooden boats. First of all, you need to disabuse yourself of the notion that working on the boat is going to be like working in your woodshop with the sweet smell of sawdust. It ain't, particularly when it comes to sanding and refinishing wood. It's dirty, time consuming, and largely unrewarding work. You're not improving the boat, you're bringing it back to what you think it should be. We're not talking 100 hours here. We're talking hundreds and hundreds and hundreds, a lot of it with a respirator on. It might be "fun" and rewarding for the first 100 hours but after that it's going to be an albatross.

Don't get me wrong, some people are made for that. I personally adore wooden boats. I just want to make sure you understand that to bring her back to what your dream of her is it's not going to be a bit of sanding on a sunny day with a beer in your hand. It's going to get tedious much closer to the start of the project than the end.
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Old 23-02-2013, 05:25   #27
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

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Originally Posted by BigRalph View Post
Intersting. I think you might be being a little sarcastic, but actually I'm interested in both. I love being on the water, but even though I'm a complete novice I have a lot of woodworking equipment and I love the smell of saw dust. Really. So, I'm in a weird place personally and the whole live aboard, restoration, powered sailing would be very good for me. Kathartic?

Here's the lady: 1967 Grand Banks 32 Trawler Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

In the transition days, when the use of fiberglass was beginning, it was common to encase a wood hull in 'glass, while the deck and house were still wood. A bit later, the hulls became all (mostly) glass (aside from coring, stringers, etc.), but the deck and house was still commonly wood until... hmmmm... maybe late '70s/early '80s (give or take).

If I remember right, GB pretty much followed that transition schedule to the letter... and I think the basic boat designs remained pretty much the same throughout.

IOW, it's maybe possible to find the "same" boat with at least a 'glass hull.

-Chris
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Old 24-02-2013, 23:21   #28
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

The early days of fibreglass sheathing were I believe marked by a failure of the sheathing to stick to the wood. That is why I suggested the OP consulted experts and considered the exact means of construction.
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Old 25-02-2013, 04:52   #29
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

I said goodbye to her yesterday. After researching and listening to you, ad well as a sister forum specific to trawlers, I realize its not meant to be. I'm going to look at the Trojan F32 again today.
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Old 27-02-2013, 12:59   #30
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Re: Considering a 32' Grand Banks Woodie

I really appreciate everyone's feedback. In the end, the owner of the brokerage even agreed that the GB was a terrible choice for me. They're supposed to refund my deposit soon.

Meanwhile, I put a deposit down on the Trojan F32, she's a 1990 and I really was impressed. The space for my clothes from a second cabin is absent, but otherwise, for just me, it's perfect. The price is great, better than I could have hoped for. My only reservation is that it has 2 gas guzzling engines and I won't be able to take her out as often, but will get there a heap of a lot faster. As a young-ish liveaboard, I realize I'll have fewer opportunities than I read about from those of you that have retired anyway, but part of the major allure for me is the chance to take my home to other places. I am super excited about this.

Status: sea trials and survey tomorrow, 2/28. Clean up the hull while it's out of the water over the weekend, provided everything goes well, and close maybe Tuesday or Wednesday next week. I already found a marina that seems to cater to likeaboards in the area and it's close, like damn near in, the Chesapeake Bay.

Initially, I'm signing up for 6 months at the mast (yeah, it doesn't have one, but I like Pirates of the Carribean); I'm already thinking this may be a very long-term situation.

I cannot thank some of you enough for talking me down. The GB and any wooden boat is beautiful, but it's just beyond me.
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