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Old 01-12-2010, 17:15   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gonesail View Post
in florida you cannot leave ports open in the summer and be able to sleep at night. but you still need a dehumidifier or an air conditioner. an awning helps. no condensation.. instead we have mildew.
when i was in fla last year, we kept our ports and hatches open and had a cover and didnt have a problem with any of these---just skeeters, as his boat had no screens..LOL.....i will...when you head into wind while at anchor, life is much nicer than when you are at mercy of weather. at anchor, you USE the weather. with a good breeze--no hot , no humid, no sketers..very comfy...
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Old 01-12-2010, 17:30   #32
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The main reason there is more condensation in winter than summer is because the differance in temperature between the out side of the hull and the inside of the hull is greater (what might be 80% humidity in 75F air would condense on a hull that is sitting in 40F water), followed by other factors related to outside temperature. Hatches are kept closed keeping everything that produces moisture contained, breathing, burning propane flame, steam from cooking, etc.
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Old 01-12-2010, 18:40   #33
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Quote:
So your vote to prevent condensation;

1, insulation?
2, ventilation?
3, heating?
All three are a must in colder climes.

I hope your cousins appreciate being "redone".
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Old 01-12-2010, 22:09   #34
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Thanks for the Hypervent suggestion!
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Old 01-12-2010, 22:17   #35
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[QUOTE=DeepFrz;570087]All three are a must in colder climes.

I hope your cousins appreciate being "redone".[/QUOTE

hopfully most knew what I meant to say...guess it cauld be worst.
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Old 02-12-2010, 00:35   #36
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As I have very little in the way of condensation and my hull is 1" wood followed by a 2" air space (open at top and bottom for ventilation) I would say insulation is most important, ventilation is necessary for heating to have any effect. 1 & 2
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Old 02-12-2010, 08:21   #37
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The main reason there is more condensation in winter than summer is because the differance in temperature between the out side of the hull and the inside of the hull is greater (what might be 80% humidity in 75F air would condense on a hull that is sitting in 40F water), followed by other factors related to outside temperature. Hatches are kept closed keeping everything that produces moisture contained, breathing, burning propane flame, steam from cooking, etc.
so id be better to spray foam the hull below the water line then?
most do the oposite wich has little effects on condensation
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Old 02-12-2010, 08:59   #38
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One other idea for preventing moisture under the mattress, is to use a thick, natural wool fleece mattress cover. We used it for 4 years in the tropics, and even in hot climes, it helped with air flow and kept us cooler. We also had Dri-dek tiles at that time. Now we've switched to the German made Froli mattress springs, which provides the same kind of air flow, but some "cush" for the body as well. We really like them.
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Old 02-12-2010, 09:58   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfenzee
As I have very little in the way of condensation and my hull is 1" wood followed by a 2" air space (open at top and bottom for ventilation) I would say insulation is most important, ventilation is necessary for heating to have any effect. 1 & 2
Just to clarify for all those wanting to live-aboard on a fiberglass boat. The R-factor of an inch of solid hardwood is a little less than R-1. Snow has a higher R- factor. I speculate if you have a cored fiberglass hull, you would actually have superior insulating properties over wood (or solid fiber). We have a cored deck and solid hulls and do just fine with no condensation. We keep the relative humidity very low so that we can live, cook, bathe, etc in comfort. The pic shows inside/outside temps and inside relative humidity as of this morning.

Just shows there's more than one way to skin a cat, both Wolf and I have and do live abroad during PNW winters. Two different boats with two different approaches. Both seem to work!


P.S. Did this reply with pic all on my iPhone- is that cool or what??
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Old 02-12-2010, 17:44   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoPowers View Post
Just to clarify for all those wanting to live-aboard on a fiberglass boat. The R-factor of an inch of solid hardwood is a little less than R-1. Snow has a higher R- factor. I speculate if you have a cored fiberglass hull, you would actually have superior insulating properties over wood (or solid fiber). We have a cored deck and solid hulls and do just fine with no condensation. We keep the relative humidity very low so that we can live, cook, bathe, etc in comfort. The pic shows inside/outside temps and inside relative humidity as of this morning.

Just shows there's more than one way to skin a cat, both Wolf and I have and do live abroad during PNW winters. Two different boats with two different approaches. Both seem to work!


P.S. Did this reply with pic all on my iPhone- is that cool or what??
I also pointed out that in addition to the 1" of wood there is a 2" air space between hull and 1/4" cieling with ventilation top and bottom. Over a period of about 3 months the most water I get is a couple of quarts, not really enough for a bilge pump I use a wet/dry vac (just out of principle I would rather not have water in my bilge if I can help it).
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Old 02-12-2010, 18:48   #41
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I lived aboard for 7 years in FL (Yeah I know but it does freeze here).
  • Every closed space had a muffin fan
  • Sqeegee and absorber (synthetic chamois) for the head after showers
  • same for single glazed windows
  • electric heat
  • exhaust vent for the stove
  • Open her up whenever wx permits
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