Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 25-01-2011, 09:20   #16
Registered User
 
CDunc's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Jacksonville Florida
Boat: 1972 Tartan 34C Fleur De Mer
Posts: 141
Cpt Force,

Is it you that had a slip at Aspasia marina in South Portland Maine summer of '07?
__________________

__________________
CDunc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 12:15   #17
Registered User
 
Lexam's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Kansas City, MO
Boat: In my dreams
Posts: 92
LMAO. Thanks for the corrections that's why I put in the grain of ignorance. I couldn't remember if it was "Off the hook" referring to the docks looking like hooks maybe, or "On the hook" being the anchor. I took a 50/50 chance.

Thanks for the insight. I think I would agree with an earlier post. This would be easier if you did not have to work. But so many things would be easier then.
__________________

__________________
Lexam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 12:23   #18
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDunc View Post
Cpt Force,

Is it you that had a slip at Aspasia marina in South Portland Maine summer of '07?
No, I've taken moorings at CYC, Portland Yacht Services & Peak's Island, but no slips.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 12:48   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Denver, Colorado
Boat: 1980 Cape Dory 30' Cutter - Swift Ranger
Posts: 35
We lived on the hook for about 7 months, spending the night at a dock a total of 3 times. It was really hard to replenish water and stores while living at anchor, sometimes we'd have to make 4 quarter mile trips in our rowing dinghy. However, we never had bug or rodent problems like so many dockside liveaboards experience.

Patrick
PaddyoRiley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 13:42   #20
Registered User
 
Play Actor's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cruising the Caribbean
Boat: Baba 35, Play Actor
Posts: 119
We've lived at anchor for 11 years now, up and down the east coast from the Chesapeake to the Bahamas and up the Gulf Coast of Florida. We've spent the last 7 years in the Eastern Caribbean, and can't even remember the last time we tied up to a dock. We catch rain wherever we've been, and can count on our fingers the times we've had to carry water in jugs. We do carry diesel in jugs because we like to prefilter it into the tank, but we use very little.

We are full time cruisers, though, so that may make a difference. We've ocassionally spent a few months working ashore in the states in different places, relying on the dinghy and public transportation.

It's a different life. We prefer it.
__________________
Bud Dougherty
Aboard Play Actor
www.voyagesoftheplayactor.blogspot.com
Play Actor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 13:50   #21
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,188
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

The 'water thing' is no big deal really.. everytime you finish a jug... chuck it in the dinghy... when you go ashore.. fill em.. on average I hit shoreside at least twice a day when anchored... the beach... shopping... a walk... meet friends.. a couple every days a lot easier than a fortnightly mission of who knows how many jugs...
Waters usually available near the tie up/beaching areas so just top up before heading back.. pick your anchoring spots carefully and its a doodle..
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 16:42   #22
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
The 'water thing' is no big deal really.. everytime you finish a jug... chuck it in the dinghy... when you go ashore..
Ditto. Take a couple of five litre containers each time and you'll never run out and never notice the load. Fuel the same. I'm not a liveaboard, that's true (couldn't cope without the shed ), but by estimation I'm sure boatman is right (this time ).
__________________
Wand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 16:48   #23
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,188
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

Quote:
Originally Posted by At sea View Post
but by estimation I'm sure boatman is right (this time ).
Cheers mate... I'm hitting my average 1 outa 10 right... I'm happy... Don't worry
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2011, 09:38   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Morlaix Brittany France blog: theguerns.blogspot.com
Boat: Colvic Watson/32ft/Feels Good
Posts: 461
Images: 4
Send a message via Skype™ to feelsgood
26 ft Sadler bilge keel in Spanish Ria at anchor FREE drop in to marina any day for 6 hrs for water do the shopping or laundry and back to anchor no problems no cost and al FREE. See size does matter.
__________________
feelsgood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2011, 09:48   #25
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
Quote:
Originally Posted by feelsgood View Post
26 ft Sadler bilge keel in Spanish Ria at anchor FREE drop in to marina any day for 6 hrs for water do the shopping or laundry and back to anchor no problems no cost and al FREE. See size does matter.

That may be so where you are located, but it will not be allowed in many, if not most other areas. Especially in the southeast US. Chuck
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2011, 10:05   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Morlaix Brittany France blog: theguerns.blogspot.com
Boat: Colvic Watson/32ft/Feels Good
Posts: 461
Images: 4
Send a message via Skype™ to feelsgood
wow

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterwayguy View Post
That may be so where you are located, but it will not be allowed in many, if not most other areas. Especially in the southeast US. Chuck
WOW and I thought everybody wanted to live the good old US of A. NOT
__________________
feelsgood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2011, 10:24   #27
Registered User
 
HappySeagull's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: B.C.,Canada
Boat: 29'
Posts: 2,395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lexam View Post
Reading the "Marinas Hate Livaboards" thread got me thinking. (remember take everything I say or ask with a big grain of ignorance). What are the challenges of living outside a Marina? And is there and option of having a private dock? (I would imagine this would be rather expensive).

I just like the idea of being able to move when ever I want, but I guess that's the dream.
The dinghy is the thing.It must suit.EVERYTHING goes in the dinghy.If you have big tides,it cannot be heavy because you need get it up or down the beach at low water.No motor or at least portable dolly given a smooth,hard beach... It need be tough.No inflatables.It need be "not too nice" but this is not enough protection in itself because the most common thieves are kids joyriding.It need be locked and you might consider having a spare including oars somewhere ....A friend with property ashore is a godsend.

This Liveaboard hates Marinas...why people pay for the racket and lack of privacy is beyond me except maybe very short-term.

As to moorings,many people hereabouts foul the anchorages with them.99% have no legal basis unless a boat is attached.If they are in my way,I ignore them or tie to them as a second anchor.They usually get abandoned (when the thrill is gone)and they are too much trouble to hoist and check so abandoned,they sink to the bottom,and snag a sailor's anchor ....They are litter.
__________________
HappySeagull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2011, 10:32   #28
Registered User
 
S/V Alchemy's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Toronto
Boat: Custom 41' Steel Pilothouse Cutter
Posts: 4,572
Jokes aside, between the security mania and the disdain for cruisers in many places, I find the U.S. to be less attractive as a cruising destination. This is not the case everywhere, of course...in fact it's somewhat irregular...but some cruisers of my acquaintance have written off Florida outside of the purposes of a day spent in one of the "boat junk" warehouses, and another spent loading half a ton of provisions into the boat. "Hanging out" seems expensive and discouraging in many areas.

I understand that the U.S. has the right to guard its borders as it sees fit, but it has to be accepted that in some cases, this is going to deter foreigners from visiting. I also understand that some liveaboards have not been great guests in certain locales, leading the residents to either ban them or to remove moorings or to raise rates very high. That too is a disincentive.

Around here (Lake Ontario), the process of visiting the south side of the lake has been made harder, and the USCG is more frequently boarding and inspecting Canadian boats. That's their right. But fewer people from my Toronto-based club want to bother with the charming small towns of "New York's North Coast", and reports continue to show that this is hurting these places economically.
__________________
S/V Alchemy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2011, 16:16   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by S/V Alchemy View Post
Around here (Lake Ontario), the process of visiting the south side of the lake has been made harder, and the USCG is more frequently boarding and inspecting Canadian boats. That's their right. But fewer people from my Toronto-based club want to bother with the charming small towns of "New York's North Coast", and reports continue to show that this is hurting these places economically.
This is a bit of a drift but I've often wondered how it works across the lakes where the border runs down the middle. I know that in areas straddling the border regular land crossers can get a fast card or similar to expidite the process, but what about boaters? If you sail across the lake, can you anchor on the other side or even tie up somewhere for, say, a limited time without it being an issue? Or do you have to have organised the immigration stamps beforehand? I guess I'm asking whether there are immigration 'bylaws' that cover such weekender cross-lake cruisers or whether you'd get boarded and dragged away? (there's nothing comparable to instruct down here - sail out from here and next stop the antarctic)
__________________
Wand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-01-2011, 18:08   #30
Registered User
 
capnorv's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Bainbridge Island Washington on the Salish Sea
Boat: Hardin 45 Voyager Alice B., Gig Harbor 10, Orca 7 1/2 sloop, 16' sea kayak
Posts: 364
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by doug86 View Post
exactly what I was thinking too.... perhaps the OP meant "off the grid", and to live off the grid by living "on the hook".

If you're not "on the dole", your phone won't "ring off the hook" and you can live "off the grid" by keeping your boat "on the hook"; i.e. at anchor.

BTW, what do people who live off the grid do on their day off?

If you set your alarm clock to go off at 6am, how come you turn if off again to make it stop ringing?
After five years living on our boat, we moved to our off grid cabin, and on our days off, we went to the boat. The good thing about an off grid cabin is, when we brought boys of color home and the neighbors turned us in for not getting building permits, the county's reaction was to turn our utilities off, but they weren't theirs to turn off. fyi
__________________

__________________
capnorv is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
off the hook

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Living off the hook / grid - what do you need? SweetSurrender General Sailing Forum 42 11-02-2009 12:58
Living on the Hook in Santa Barbara - personal experience? windsaloft Liveaboard's Forum 0 05-04-2008 18:31



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:24.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.