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Old 11-11-2007, 04:29   #31
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Letting Go

Go for it, Frost!

There is something quintessentially “Zen-like” about the process of selling your stuff and “letting go” which you describe. Perhaps we all need that flash of Satori, in order to cast off the lines and pursue our respective journeys on the water.

Thank you for reminding me.

Good sailing and fair winds.
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Old 12-11-2007, 10:46   #32
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You're going to love this! Perhaps you'll even find a partner to share it with. Not all chicks, or kids = baggage, or the inability to pursue your life dreams.
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Old 12-11-2007, 18:29   #33
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In '83 my wife and I sold everything that we owned, bought our boat and left on a 3-year cruise around the world.

We returned home in '98, 14 years and 2 circumnavigations later. You can't emagine what you can do if you try. You also will never know what you missed, if you don't.

Having some mechanical aptitude and imagination helps a lot.

BTW, when we started out, we barely knew how to sail. Our 1st passage was LA to Hawaii.........in January........ooooooo......not bright. I shiver every time I think about it (and not because it was cold either).
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Old 18-11-2007, 15:42   #34
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Good luck

Good Luck and happy adventures ahead!
Check out, Solo-Sailor....One Woman's Solo-Circumnavigation of the World
This young 43 yr old lady is doing the same as you. She is leaving land Jan. 1, 2008
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Old 23-11-2007, 07:00   #35
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pirate Way to go!!

You're off on a great adventure. I'll look forward to hearing all about it.

My favorite t-shirt says, "Don't dream your life. Live your dreams." You're doing it!

Pam
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Old 01-12-2007, 16:41   #36
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Hey--Lay off the old farts--it is never too late to go--unless already on the death bed.
If you are realy feeble you might need electric winches--
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Old 01-12-2007, 18:05   #37
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Quote:
Hey--Lay off the old farts--it is never too late to go--unless already on the death bed. If you are really feeble you might need electric winches--
e had a local ,man complete a solo circumnavigation in 9 year at the final age of 89. I figure he got it about right. The idea is to be the slowest person not the fastest.

Not everything that has been done can be done by you, but you won't know until you try. I would only add that it is supposed to be fun. There is no payoff if you complete the trip and my lesson above says it's best to delay the end of the trip as long as you can.
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Old 01-12-2007, 19:34   #38
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Hey--Lay off the old farts--it is never too late to go--unless already on the death bed.
If you are realy feeble you might need electric winches--
Exactly.

When I was 17 years old I was plying the route between the USVI and Martinique on an old, wooden ship transporting avocados and grapefruits north. We were only four on board but one of the crew was dying of cancer and spending the last days of his life on the ocean, watching the sunsets and the dolphins. He was a really nice man and I admired his courage.

I decided then, that when I become old – so old that it really doesn’t matter any more – that I will not spend those last days in an old-folks-home. When my time comes, I’ll get on my ship for that last, final cruise. I’ll say goodbye to everyone first, of course. But then I will be gone. I don’t want them to see me waste away. I prefer to spend those last moments with a deck under my feet, the wind in what remains of my hair and the taste of salt on my lips.

That is the way I’m going to sign off.

Until that time comes, I’ll be on the water, cruising.

My last thought will not be one of regret, for not having done it.
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Old 19-12-2007, 05:22   #39
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So true david..(from page 2)

Just go and enjoy the time you have...now.

Well done Frost...You are brave in heart to go off and try the unknown..

don't think what have I done, think what can I do now...
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Old 09-02-2008, 22:18   #40
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Since I'm also 31, have been accused of the "midlife crisis" thing, called crazy, and received various other comments and opinions more than once since I went public about my sailboat purchase plans... I couldn't help but read this thread with a huge grin on my face. I've since been referring naysayers directly to this link as my default response to criticism. Wow has that saved a lot of time!
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Old 09-02-2008, 23:17   #41
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I'm 55 looking at 2 more years in the workforce before I can do what you are doing. I am sooo envious that you are doing it at your time in life.
For me - after 35 years in the workforce - I have got too much tied up in my superannuation to leave any sooner. I would lose a packet of money and would be severely restricted in my retirement dreams. If only I had embraced a cruising life in my younger days...
Go for it!
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Old 09-02-2008, 23:19   #42
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Having some mechanical aptitude and imagination helps a lot.

BTW, when we started out, we barely knew how to sail. Our 1st passage was LA to Hawaii.........in January........ooooooo......not bright.
Planning the same trip late summer, except solo. Half of me thinks I'm a nut, the other half knows that if I don't do it I'll regret it the rest of my life.
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Old 10-02-2008, 11:19   #43
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Geez Grey, that was beautiful!

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyRaven View Post
Exactly.

When I was 17 years old I was plying the route between the USVI and Martinique on an old, wooden ship transporting avocados and grapefruits north. We were only four on board but one of the crew was dying of cancer and spending the last days of his life on the ocean, watching the sunsets and the dolphins. He was a really nice man and I admired his courage.

I decided then, that when I become old – so old that it really doesn’t matter any more – that I will not spend those last days in an old-folks-home. When my time comes, I’ll get on my ship for that last, final cruise. I’ll say goodbye to everyone first, of course. But then I will be gone. I don’t want them to see me waste away. I prefer to spend those last moments with a deck under my feet, the wind in what remains of my hair and the taste of salt on my lips.

That is the way I’m going to sign off.

Until that time comes, I’ll be on the water, cruising.

My last thought will not be one of regret, for not having done it.
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Old 10-02-2008, 15:14   #44
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Way to go Frost! Besides, you have nothing to lose if your work opportunity has already evaporated.
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Old 10-02-2008, 17:34   #45
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posted these inspirational words before, but. . . from the last master mariner to qualify under sail . . Sterling Hayden (shot in the head my Michael Corleone in The Godfather, (as an actor)) . . .
To be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen, who play with their boats at sea - "cruising," it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.
"I've always wanted to sail to the South Seas, but I can't afford it." What these men can't afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of "security." And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine - and before we know it our lives are gone.
What does a man need - really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in - and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That's all - in the material sense. And we know it. But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention from the sheer idiocy of the charade.
The years thunder by. The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it the tomb is sealed.
Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life? (end quote)

You are at the crossroads, choose well. . I'd rather burn out than rust. . . .
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