Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 17-01-2011, 14:03   #1
Registered User
 
set_sail's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Northern Oklahoma - No sailable water for 1000 miles
Boat: Don't currently have one :-(
Posts: 20
Send a message via Yahoo to set_sail Send a message via Skype™ to set_sail
How Can You Determine a Timeframe ?

For sailing? I'm in the beginning stages of the whole thing, and I still have yet to get a boat or anything, but how can you determine a timeframe and distances for a trip?
__________________

__________________
set_sail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 14:16   #2
Registered User
 
Khagan1227's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kansas City, MO
Boat: In the hunt again, unknown
Posts: 1,330
I figure 100 - 125 miles per day in a 30' boat. That depends on wind, seas, etc. The longer the hull the faster the boat, generally speaking.
__________________

Khagan1227 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 14:28   #3
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
Your range per day increases with experience to the point where you tend to know what the base value is for your boat. For the beginner day sails of 40 nm is a pretty long day.

I would start out with the idea of hours not miles. Let your experience dictate how far you are willing to sail in a day. You really are not going to do 24 hour passages in the beginning. You need to grow into your abilities.
__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 14:37   #4
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
Sometimes experience will slow you down. We left the Saint Johns River in NE Florida twelve days ago and we have traveled a total of 130 miles. Tomorrow we'll head down Mosquito Lagoon to Indian River where we will anchor off Titusville and fill one of our propane tanks. We tend to enjoy where we are without striving to be anywhere else soon.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 14:50   #5
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
Quote:
We tend to enjoy where we are without striving to be anywhere else soon.
Not being on a schedule is the lesson of true experience.
__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 15:05   #6
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,193
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

I would not go to much on what a boats capable of... those speeds are usually achieved in open water and trade wind conditions where it'll blow steady for weeks on end...
For everyday coastal sailing I'd reckon on more like 80-90/24hrs... if tides are not to strong... some places you have to lay to anchor till the tides change.. so you can cut the above in half straight away...
Oh.. that's in a 30/32ftr
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 15:19   #7
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
That may be a more complex question than you realize. Figuring what the boat can do and what the sailor can do often require different formulas.

There are basically two types of sailors: those who enjoy getting there, and those who enjoy being there. The first type often doesn't mind a slower passage; if the winds lighten up and the knotlog only reads two knots, they are fine with that. The second type, who will inevitably be married to the first type, generally have a number etched in their brains below which they cannot tolerate dawdling. My wife, for example, begins to itch if the boat speed drops below five knots on a long trip, and if she's on watch there's a good chance that the engine will come on once we drop below four knots. For her, the fun begins the moment we drop the hook and rig up the sun shade. And not a moment sooner.

It helps, if your boat partner is a "being there" type sailor, to have a big, fast boat and always run it downwind in the tradewinds. At that point, you can reliably pick a number, such as "150 nautical miles."

If someone tells you that they average anything more than 150 nm per day, you must consider one of five possibilities: (1) the person is wealthy enough to own too much waterline for their own good (I include owners of large catamarans in this group, btw); (2) the person pushes the boat and crew far too hard for their own good; (3) the person spends the greater part of his/her time sailing through gales; (4) the person is navigational challenged and really hasn't got a clue how far he sailed yesterday; (5) the person is a congenital liar.

I'm happy to report that there are only two congenital liars included among the membership of this forum, and that they both claim to be "getting there" types, but we have reason to believe that their fuel bills are higher than they admit.
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 15:26   #8
Registered User
 
set_sail's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Northern Oklahoma - No sailable water for 1000 miles
Boat: Don't currently have one :-(
Posts: 20
Send a message via Yahoo to set_sail Send a message via Skype™ to set_sail
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pblais View Post
Not being on a schedule is the lesson of true experience.
I will certainly take this piece of advice and store it front and center. Thank you.
__________________
set_sail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 15:32   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
Minggat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hawaii, South Pacific bound
Boat: Islander 36
Posts: 1,220

Until you actually get a boat you can count on it taking much longer.

As far as that timeframe goes, set goals. Mine were always 3-5 years. That never got any shorter until I noticed that I had never bothered to set a date.

Not at all what you asked, but related in my warped thinking.
__________________
Minggat
Minggat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 15:42   #10
Registered User
 
courageous cat's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: michigan
Boat: g-cat 5. m
Posts: 156
Images: 1
speed x time = distance

time divided by distance = speed

speed diveded by distance = time
i think thats right. If not someone will corect me
__________________
courageous cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 15:53   #11
Registered User
 
courageous cat's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: michigan
Boat: g-cat 5. m
Posts: 156
Images: 1
I mean distance diveded by time or speed
sorry about that
__________________
courageous cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 16:44   #12
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
You divide the trip distance by the distance you can cover per day and the result comes in days. Distance/speed=time.

Over larger areas you may be forced to respect the seasons - esp. with a non-extreme boat. Not much cruising in the polar regions in the winter nor in the tropics in the summer.

b.
__________________

__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Marieholm 26 - How Do I Determine its Age ? VP21 Monohull Sailboats 2 06-09-2010 11:35
How to Determine if Buffing Would Return Shine bilgedawg Construction, Maintenance & Refit 2 28-06-2010 10:35
Departure Timeframe to the Caribbean Teej Atlantic & the Caribbean 14 25-06-2010 07:12
Paid Rides - Barbados to Mainland US (November Timeframe) alexanac Atlantic & the Caribbean 1 01-10-2009 06:45
Help Determine Spinnaker Fabric Weight Celeste General Sailing Forum 4 21-11-2006 17:17



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:09.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.