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Old 02-11-2010, 05:52   #16
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I like the Canadians that make it down here to the Keys. Friends of mine that work in restaurants and bars would appreciate it if they learned our tipping standards.
LOL Betcha look forward to a mob of Aussies walking in!
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Old 02-11-2010, 14:17   #17
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Friends of mine that work in restaurants and bars would appreciate it if they learned our tipping standards.
Don't all cruisers know that "when in Rome"......................................

I thought that was standard practice no matter where one cruised.
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Old 02-11-2010, 19:24   #18
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I like the Canadians that make it down here to the Keys. Friends of mine that work in restaurants and bars would appreciate it if they learned our tipping standards.
My nephew worked a season at a Lodge in Mammoth California.. they had a Bus load come in of English fo0lks.. It was an Older lodge , 4 floors and No Elevator.. 3 days and Not tip one... they barly saud thank you...
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Old 02-11-2010, 19:37   #19
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I like the Canadians that make it down here to the Keys. Friends of mine that work in restaurants and bars would appreciate it if they learned our tipping standards.
Too many Canadians don't know Canadian tipping standards...

I think what gets remembered are the ones that don't follow the standards of the locale, and never the ones that do. British, French, American- you always remember the worst of the lot, not the best.
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Old 02-11-2010, 19:49   #20
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Us Alaskans, love Canada, She keeps them carpet baggers from the U.S. from taking over around here. Tell the Quibeckies, that we only speak french after we get really drunk and translate through a Portuguese chief engineer while in a dive bar in Cameroon, Africa.
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Old 02-11-2010, 20:36   #21
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What is the difference between a Canadian and A Canoe?

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I like the Canadians that make it down here to the Keys. Friends of mine that work in restaurants and bars would appreciate it if they learned our tipping standards.
You have to understand that, as Canadians boaters, we grow up in very unstable canoes on top of very cold waters. Tipping is the last thing we would want to do.
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Old 02-11-2010, 21:42   #22
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Surely if in the US and navigating the waters, one one use the local language ? US English.
Failure to do so in an accident may leave the visitor liable and without their vessel.
D
When I say, "Out and about in a boat", I get real looks of consternation from native US speakers however when I say colour instead of color they seem to know what I mean. On the other hand, in Mexico, "Quando paramucho paramia parasol" just gets blank looks. I suppose I should learn spanish before trying to speak it though it is easier to just spout inanities and hope for the best

Do you always speak the native language of the places where you sail?
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Old 02-11-2010, 23:04   #23
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Do you always speak the native language of the places where you sail?
No, the natives learn faster if we speak old Norse from the very beginning.



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Old 02-11-2010, 23:58   #24
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English????
If you are in south Florida, speak the local language, SPANISH!!!!
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Old 03-11-2010, 03:32   #25
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English????
If you are in south Florida, speak the local language, SPANISH!!!!
Sad but true.marc
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Old 03-11-2010, 04:59   #26
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Don't all cruisers know that "when in Rome"......................................

I thought that was standard practice no matter where one cruised.

The biggest problem is actually establishing the customs of a new place - no good telling someone to act in Rome like the Romans if you don't know how the Romans act!
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Old 03-11-2010, 06:44   #27
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When I say, "Out and about in a boat", I get real looks of consternation from native US speakers however when I say colour instead of color they seem to know what I mean. On the other hand, in Mexico, "Quando paramucho paramia parasol" just gets blank looks. I suppose I should learn spanish before trying to speak it though it is easier to just spout inanities and hope for the best

Do you always speak the native language of the places where you sail?

For the Most part, Amereekins only speek "Amereekin" and Bad at that...
I thimk we should all go back to Grunts and Squeeks..
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Old 03-11-2010, 06:48   #28
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I like the Canadians that make it down here to the Keys. Friends of mine that work in restaurants and bars would appreciate it if they learned our tipping standards.
I have many Canadian friends from east to west, most are very cordial, and always have rum on board

Do you know the difference between a Canadian and a canoe?
Canoes tip
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Old 03-11-2010, 08:26   #29
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Quebec sailors have a bad reputation on the waterway. I don't think this is deserved but rather they got this rep because they usually speak French on the vhf and most other folks don't understand the language. This I think is the main reason they are seen as undesirables and you hear all sorts of rumours regarding Quebec sailors. Tying up uninvited is just another of those rumours. Also when something goes missing they are always blamed. The ones I have met have invariably been as nice as the English speaking sailors.
Ah, blame the foreigner. A U.S. tradition.
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Old 03-11-2010, 08:36   #30
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To our neighbors to the north... my apologies and rest asured you are welcomed in our part of the world...
To fellow Americans, keep in mind that people from other cultures are just as adept at stereotyping the American as we are at stereotyping them and the results are not always flattering. The following are a few examples of the qualities (some positive, some negative) that we found people from other countries frequently associate with the "typical" American: loud, rude, boastful, wealthy, hardworking, extravagant, and wasteful. Racially prejudiced, ignorant of other countries, always in a hurry, promiscuous.
Frequently, the stereotype of the American is far from complimentary: the boorish tourist who expects everyone to speak English, the arrogant patriot who thinks every country in the world should pattern itself after the United States, the drunken reveler who sees the anonymity of traveling abroad as an opportunity to drop all civilized inhibitions. I'm sure all you Americans speak the local language when on the vhf or else where in someone elses country or even care to know their customs and traditions.
But more important is how do you learn about another culture while passing negative judgments on aspects that are different from our own? Appreciate cultural differences and also realize that fundamentally we are all the same.
The pot calling the kettle black...... People in glass houses...

Just my humble thoughts...

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