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Old 02-09-2010, 17:20   #46
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Try Costa Rica, never been hit by a hurricane. Relatively cheap but almost no marinas
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Old 02-09-2010, 17:20   #47
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Originally Posted by speedoo View Post
Good question, since the straight line distance to the north coast of Trinidad is about 100 miles. However, I'm not sure there are any ports of entry/dood harbors on the north coast.
I infer from your question that you based your response on never having sailed to Trinidad.
A straight line? I would direct your attention to the Islands of the rest of the Grenidines and a rather large rock known as the Island of Granada.
Oh by the way, you must stop in Union Island during the day to check out.
Your mileage may vary but 140 miles is closer to reality
.
There are very few places to anchor on the north shore of Trinidad, but if you do without telling Customs in either Trinidad or Tobago first, ugly things can happen to you. Refrain from stopping at Scotland bay before checking in for the same reason. Trust me on this! Counting going South and going North. I've done this passage 14 times.

Coming South from Granada there are a few things to be aware of.
You MUST check in on the day of your arrival, or lie like heck and hope for the best.
You MUST enter the bay during daylight. This will give you a chance to miss the unlit fisherman and maybe the odd pirate from that country next door. You also must leave enough daylight to park your boat and check-in about 5 miles from the entrance.
Somethings to note on the crossing: Your going to cross an international shipping lane, in the dark. Go to the west of the two Gas Platforms. There are three areas where the westward flowing current approches 3 knots.
Hurricane season? Think of feeder-bands directing very nasty weather from the nearby ITCZ toward any TD's or TS's or hurricanes.
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Old 02-09-2010, 17:58   #48
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Originally Posted by rourkeh View Post
Try Costa Rica, never been hit by a hurricane. Relatively cheap but almost no marinas
I assume your talking about the east coast. Have you ever been there?

I'd guess that there's a very good reason that there's no marinas.
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Old 02-09-2010, 22:58   #49
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Why even consider Costa Rico (east coast) when just across the border in Panama is Bocas del Toro. There is a growing cruiser community there and two good marinas. It is also an area that is normally "outside" the hurricane "box."
- - Back to the eastern Caribbean, assuming "a day" has 24 hours you can get from the Tobago Cays, Grenadines to Chag Bay Trinidad in a day. It is exactly 124 nm including a stop at Union Island to Check-out. At 6 kts that is about 20 hours underway and allow 2-3 hours for the stop at Union Island. It is doable but IMHO the Tobago Cays is not a prudent place to be caught as you do not have access to reliable internet there so you would be relying of some very "iffy" weather forecasts from HF radio.
- - In Tyrrell Bay, Carriacou (15.5nm south of Tobago Cays) there is fairly good wifi internet available and for a "near miss" you can hide in the Carenage Mangrove Swamp. Normally you can get a quite good predicted track on a storm when it is about 48 hrs away. Enough for you to head for Trinidad or Southern Grenada. Incidentally you would pass to the east of Grenada for the shortest direct line to Trinidad.
- - But one consideration everybody overlooks is that it is rather unlikely you will be able to "sail" to Trinidad should a hurricane get within 2 days of the area. The hurricane is "sucking" in air from all directions to feed itself. This results in the normal trade winds ceasing and calm conditions prevailing during that period. The old timers down here know that if the trade winds cease or reverse it is time to head for high ground, something big is on the way. So anyway you must be prepared to motorsail the whole way if necessary.
- - It just isn't smart to try to defy or bet against Mother Nature, eventually you will lose big. Instead just don't be where a hurricane is going to pass - given that you do have the means to go elsewhere. If you don't have the ability to move then you must do the best you can to prepare - but that is a whole nuther thread.
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Old 04-09-2010, 19:49   #50
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Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
It is doable but IMHO the Tobago Cays is not a prudent place to be caught as you do not have access to reliable internet there so you would be relying of some very "iffy" weather forecasts from HF radio.
With a Digicel data SIM, wifi is available everywhere in the Eastern Caribbean they have a cellphone signal, even in the Cays. EDGE speed, runs about 100-120kbps, fast enough for email and weather forecasts. Unlimited data and no roaming charges, currently EC$47 a month from Digicel Grenada. Could be faster but at least its reliable.

Going back to my earlier post. I would not advocate the Cays as somewhere to hide if there is a chance of a direct hit, but for a near miss it has advantages: No houses, so no roof-sheets flying through the air, and no unattended, inadequately secured boats to spoil the day.
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Old 04-09-2010, 21:44   #51
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The Digitcell data card/attachment for internet access is an option. But you have to buy the card/attachment in addition to purchasing the monthly service. Since most computers come with built in WiFi these days, very few cruisers use the "cellphone internet" system. But it an option and from friend who have them they say you can use your monthly access in any island that Digitcell has cell phone service.

- - But the big problem with hiding out in the Tobago Cays is it is now a national park and anchoring is prohibited if moorings are available. And if anchoring, there are considerable restrictions on how and where. You can find the "rules and regulations" at: Tobago Cays Marine Park
And there is a $10/day fee for being there - you can see the fee structure at the same website.
I seriously doubt the park officials and rangers would allow anybody to anchor there for a named storm.
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Old 05-09-2010, 00:54   #52
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Staying in the Caribbean during hurricane season? One should be in Alaskan or northern European waters then.
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Old 05-09-2010, 08:38   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
The Digitcell data card/attachment for internet access is an option. But you have to buy the card/attachment in addition to purchasing the monthly service.
The SIM card is free, the service is only US$15 a month, it works everywhere, and its reliable. So whats the problem? I used to have to pay $50 a month to one of the 'hotspots' and their service was lousy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
But the big problem with hiding out in the Tobago Cays is it is now a national park and anchoring is prohibited if moorings are available. And if anchoring, there are considerable restrictions on how and where.........
I seriously doubt the park officials and rangers would allow anybody to anchor there for a named storm.
You are quite wrong there. There is no obligation to take the moorings, and no restriction on anchoring, other than in the coral, quite obviously. I am not going to be drawn on the fees, just go there yourself and see how it is administered.
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Old 05-09-2010, 09:12   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sobriyah View Post
The SIM card is free, the service is only US$15 a month, it works everywhere, and its reliable. So whats the problem? I used to have to pay $50 a month to one of the 'hotspots' and their service was lousy.
There are two different ways to get the internet with a cell phone provider. First is through your own cell phone and a Sim card using a cable from the cell phone to the computer. This is a rather slow speed system.
The second way is to purchase what was called an "aircard" and it is now actually a separate little device that is plugged into the USB port of your computer. This device uses a separate signal to connect with a separate antenna on the cell phone company's towers. With this system you can get high speed internet and after the initial purchase of the "aircard" you only pay the monthly access fee for the internet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sobriyah View Post
You are quite wrong there. There is no obligation to take the moorings, and no restriction on anchoring, other than in the coral, quite obviously. I am not going to be drawn on the fees, just go there yourself and see how it is administered.
Here is an extract of the Tobago Cays Rules and Reg's: Rules & Regulations:
  • Do not damage or destroy the vegetation. Remember that shoreline vegetation is essential for preventing beach erosion and stabilizing dunes.
  • Corals are fragile and grow slowly. While snorkelling or diving, do not touch the corals. Control your movements and your buoyancy.
  • Do not anchor in coral or sea grass beds, but use moorings where provided or select sandy areas.
Whether you choose to follow the rules or not is a personal moral decision. In any case should you try to stay there during a hurricane there is a large probability you will drag (if anchored in the "sandy areas") and end up on one of the islands or reefs and incur the wrath of the park bureaucrats, island government and who knows how much in fines and damage costs.
- - So why bother when Carriacou and Grenada and even Trinidad are close enough to reach with a 24 hour day? Obviously if you are insured with a lot of the marine carriers, you would not be covered especially for violations of local rules and reg's.
- - Again, one of the basic reasons for taking to a cruising boat is to get away and having the opportunity to make your own decisions about what level of risk to life or limb/boat is acceptable to you personally. And that will vary from person to person, family to family.
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Old 05-09-2010, 22:19   #55
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Hurricanes, Weather, etc....

Janice,
You've got some good answers and input here.....and, while I've sailed thru a Tropical Storm in the Atlantic for 3 days, and I've ridden out 3 direct hits of Cat 3 Hurricanes, while at anchor in Florida (and a 4 other close-calls), I've not had the pleasure of doing so in the Caribbean....
So, advice / tips from those experienced, makes a difference....and therefore, this tidbit from osirissail is worth remembering.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
Normally you can get a quite good predicted track on a storm when it is about 48 hrs away.
But one consideration everybody overlooks is that it is rather unlikely you will be able to "sail" to Trinidad should a hurricane get within 2 days of the area. The hurricane is "sucking" in air from all directions to feed itself. This results in the normal trade winds ceasing and calm conditions prevailing during that period. The old timers down here know that if the trade winds cease or reverse it is time to head for high ground, something big is on the way. So anyway you must be prepared to motorsail the whole way if necessary.
- - It just isn't smart to try to defy or bet against Mother Nature, eventually you will lose big. Instead just don't be where a hurricane is going to pass - given that you do have the means to go elsewhere. If you don't have the ability to move then you must do the best you can to prepare - but that is a whole nuther thread.






BUT, I do disagree with him here.....(and here's where I DO have a great deal of experience)....as up until this past year, I had no internet access on-board (not even a computer on-board).....so, I have relied on the "gold Standard" of marine weather / tropical weather prediction....
Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
The Tobago Cays is not a prudent place to be caught as you do not have access to reliable internet there so you would be relying of some very "iffy" weather forecasts from HF radio.
There is NO need to have internet access in order to receive accurate, reliable, and up-to-date tropical weather (Hurricanes) forecasts, when at anchor in the Caribbean....
The US National Weather Service, Tropical Prediction Center / National Hurricane Center is the defacto "Gold Standard" for tropical weather forecastsing.....and this is where all of those "web sites" get their data, and formulate their own opinions from.....
And, there are many, many ways to get all of this data / forecasts, every 3 to 6 hours, for free, all throughout the Caribbean basin, N. Atlantic, Gulf or Mex, etc....(and it's not "iffy" at all...)

1) NWS/NOAA, National Hurricane Center, Weather fax charts from NMG, USCG, New Orleans....
NWS Radiofax
http://weather.noaa.gov/pub/fax/hfgulf.txt


2) SITOR text weather forecasts from NMF, USCG, Boston...
USCG HF SITOR


3) Voice weather forecasts from NMN, USCG, Virginia, and NMG, USCG, New Orleans....and from WLO, Mobile, AL....
USCG HF Voice
ShipCom LLC :: Marine HF Radiotelephone and HF Single SideBand Email
HF SSB Radiotelephone, Telex and Email Frequencies and Channels


4) NAVTEX weather from Miami, San Juan, and Curaco....
ICS Electronics


5) Weather Fax Charts from PWZ-33, Brazil....
Navy Hydrographic Center


6) National Hurricane Center's "Hurricane Net", on 14325.0khz, whenever there's a hurricane within 3 days of landfall....


7) Chris Parker's Caribbean Weather Net, Maritime Mobile Service Net, etc. Plus a host of other sources on HF radio, both ham and maritime....




Janice, sorry if this was a bit "off topic", but it's sort-of a peeve of mine....many sailors/cruisers failing to grasp that there is a wealth of very reliable and timely data and foresasts out there, away from their keyboards and the world wide web....


I do hope this helps....

John
s/v Annie Laurie
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Old 06-09-2010, 07:07   #56
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Originally Posted by ka4wja View Post
. . . BUT, I do disagree with him here.....(and here's where I DO have a great deal of experience)....as up until this past year, I had no internet access on-board (not even a computer on-board).....so, I have relied on the "gold Standard" of marine weather / tropical weather prediction....

There is NO need to have internet access in order to receive accurate, reliable, and up-to-date tropical weather (Hurricanes) forecasts, when at anchor in the Caribbean....

John
s/v Annie Laurie
John - [All the listing are great and are also available in the Caribbean Compass newsmag and their website.]

The corollary to your comment that you did not have internet onboard until last year - is:
1. - more and more cruisers do not have SSB HF radios (especially the under $500/mo guys). And you need the Pactor system or JVComm and a computer to be able to receive emails and fax's over SSB. All of which is very expensive and mostly requires professional installation and training to be able to use the stuff.
2. - But just about everybody is taking their lapbooks/netbooks with them as they cruise. Those with SSB radios are using them less frequently now that email communications and SKYPE over the internet is the defacto way of keeping in contact with friends and family.
3. - And those with SSB's that are not being used very often or not at all since WIFI and computer systems are so much easier - have forgotten how to use the HF systems and the associated accessories needed along with having the programs on their computers to display the information. As we "upgrade" from one computer to another and Microsoft and Apple keep changing Operating Systems you must keep getting new or upgraded programs to access SSB weather. Only a few "die-hard" SSB users are willing to get involved with all that when they can access the internet from their "new" computers without anything more than turning it on and clicking of a wifi link and activate their browser.
4. - SSB is NOT a reliable communications system for receiving "must have" weather information. Solar flare activity, nearby RF, and a host of other variables make reception of SSB very "iffy" most of the time. Chris Parker does a great job but more than half the time I cannot hear him due to "hash, static and propagation patterns". SSB has always been, for its whole history, an "ear splitter" painful system.
5. - Also all the SSB weather information is on a "Scheduled Broadcast time" and if you miss the broadcast or cannot receive the broadcast then you have to wait 6 hours or 12 hours to get the next scheduled broadcast.
- - Finally, weather via the internet is "right now" available, anytime and anywhere you can receive a Wifi or Cell phone data signal. And that makes such a huge difference that I firmly believe - that for cruisers who are not heading out around the world and/ crossing big oceans, SSB installations are becoming a thing of the past just like having to know Morse Code in order to get your HAM license.
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Old 06-09-2010, 10:10   #57
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And if you really must have reliable weather, an in-cabin installation of an Iridium sat phone is about $3K. It has worked great for us this summer in Scotland when WIFI was not available. We found the SSB to be extremely unreliable.
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:52   #58
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Hurricanes, Weather, etc....

osirisail,
I know we disagree on the point of HF comms being useful / reliable.....and we've gone 'round-n-'round on this before.....
And, I truly don't wish to drift this thread further.....
I was just trying to point out to anyone looking to avoid hurricanes in/near the Caribbean that you can get VERY accurate and reliable data/forecasts while 100's or 1000's of miles away from internet access....


Perhaps we will always diagree on this, but that's life....
No worries here, my friend!!!!
But.....('ya know there's always a "but" coming from me.....


But, I do find it odd that many assume that getting good quality weather reports require internet access.....(or "expensive equipment")
I do undersatnd that many new cruisers have come from our modern society, where everyone is always "connected", and that's fine for them.....but, to imply that having internet access is necessary for high quality weather data / forecasts is (in my opinion) voicing an opinion couched as a "fact"....
And, this is where I have the problem.....
Everyone is entitled to their opinions, and certainly posting of their experiences will help everyone, but to write in a way that others may interput the opinions as facts hinders those looking for the facts....


Yes, the "real world" is different from what's written about in magazines....and that's a fact!!!
And, your experiences are valid.....and your frustrations with HF communications are nice to read....
But, this doesn't mean that HF WeFax (and SITOR, Voice, etc.) braodcasts (nor MF NAVTEX braodcasts, part of the GMDSS) are not reliable.....and to imply otherwise is a hinderance to those looking for information...



Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
1. - more and more cruisers do not have SSB HF radios (especially the under $500/mo guys). And you need the Pactor system or JVComm and a computer to be able to receive emails and fax's over SSB. All of which is very expensive and mostly requires professional installation and training to be able to use the stuff. But just about everybody is taking their lapbooks/netbooks with them as they cruise
1) Yes, I do understand that many new cruisers (and/or new Caribbean cruisers) do not have marine SSB radios....
{In my opinion, an oversight...but not relavant to this discussion}
However, I never made mention of marine SSB....Nor a PACTOR modem....
{A PACTOR modem is in NO WAY necessary to receive accurate, reliable weather data / forecasts.....whether WeFax, SITOR, NAVTEX or Voice......and to imply that it is, gives false and misleading information to those looking for accurate info.....I do not believe this was your intention....but I did wish to clarify this for others, so that they do not come away from this discussion thinking that they need to spend the $$$ on one...}

I was simply informing those looking to avoid hurricanes that making a decision as to "where" to cruise / visit / etc. during huricane season based on whether you could get "internet access" seemed like a pretty strange plan, since the best tropical weather data / forecasts are available 1000's of miles away from shore and shore-based internet access....

I have personally used a small portable HF receiver (with a cheap piece of wire throw out a hatch) to receive HF weather broadcasts.....in the Caribbean, etc.....
Total investment about $120....
And, if you wish to "decode" the WeFax and SITOR (and NAVTEX), JVcomm is FREE.....simply plug your laptop/netbook's sound card into the radio's headphone jack, and you've got the "Gold Standard" of maritime weather charts.....
Yes, I DO undderstand that some find the "fiddling with the radio" to be a pain.....and that some find this "simple" (CHEAP) alternative to be less than optimal (less relaible) than a full-on HF comms set-up....BUT the "fact" is that it does work, and it is cheap....
And, if those that wish for more reliablity want to spend the $$$ for a full-on HF comm system on board, that is their choice....




Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
2. - But just about everybody is taking their lapbooks/netbooks with them as they cruise. Those with SSB radios are using them less frequently now that email communications and SKYPE over the internet is the defacto way of keeping in contact with friends and family.
True, but mostly irrelavant to this discussion, as "keeping in contact with friends and family" has little to do with getting accurate tropica weather data / forecasts.....
Although the fact that they have their laptop/netbook already, means that downloading JVcomm (or other software) into their computers puts them within $100 of getting decent WeFax, SITOR, NAVTEX, etc.




Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
3. - And those with SSB's that are not being used very often or not at all since WIFI and computer systems are so much easier - have forgotten how to use the HF systems and the associated accessories needed along with having the programs on their computers to display the information. As we "upgrade" from one computer to another and Microsoft and Apple keep changing Operating Systems you must keep getting new or upgraded programs to access SSB weather. Only a few "die-hard" SSB users are willing to get involved with all that when they can access the internet from their "new" computers without anything more than turning it on and clicking of a wifi link and activate their browser.
Not sure what to say here.....but I suppose you're right....
I'm a "Die-Hard" raio nut....and I can't speak to what others are doing, but I just wish to point out that following the crowd as they head for all the new technology might be more expensive (buying/updating computers, etc.) than simply using what they have.....




Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
4. - SSB is NOT a reliable communications system for receiving "must have" weather information.
osirissail, please understand that I believe we are all entitled to our opinions.....but posting this, in this way, implies this is a fact....
And, the truth is that it is NOT a fact.....that is your opinion, based on your unfortuante experiences, but it is NOT a fact....
(Not sure why you keep refering to "SSB", but whatever......)

HF communications IS relaible and IS used by many, many vessels at sea everyday....(and is used everyday by every transoceanic aircraft flight)
Unless the vessel is large enough to have an INMARSAT Fleet system on board (allowing them internet access at sea), almost all ocean going, offshore commercial vessels use HF radio for WeFax charts.....and use NAVTEX for coastal weather / INMARSAT C for offshore, hi-seas, text weather.....

Again, I do understand your unfortunate experiences with it, but to imply that HF communications are not relaible enough to "get weather" is simply an inuslt to the 1000's of mariners who use it daily....and does a dis-service to those here looking for actual facts....


Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
Solar flare activity, nearby RF, and a host of other variables make reception of SSB very "iffy" most of the time. Chris Parker does a great job but more than half the time I cannot hear him due to "hash, static and propagation patterns". SSB has always been, for its whole history, an "ear splitter" painful system.
I should have never mentioned Chris Parker....sorry about that!!!
But except for his weak signal, I cannot fathom why you've had such difficulty in receiving HF weather broadcasts....and, yes as a long-time (35+ years) radio-nut, I do realize that I may have a clearer understanding of where/when to get the best results, but even during the worst radio propagation I've seen in 40 years (2007 / 2008) I was receiving WeFax charts from 2000 - 4000 miles away.....(NMF, NMG, GYA, etc.) and this summer in Florida (which hasn't had the best radio propagation) I'm getting high quality reception from 1000+ miles away, and even tried (sucessfully) GYA from England 4500 miles away.....
And, everyday, clearly hear NMN, NMG, and WLO Voice weather forecasts....on many frequencies, many times each day....(and while NMG was weaker and a bit noisy in 2007, when I was in the Canaries (4000+ miles away) I was able to get decent quality WeFax and Voice weather.....)
And, I have aquaintances who are on-board in Trini, and they regularly get WeFax charts and Voice weather forecasts....and other aquaintances who, just this past spring, used HF radio as their "back-up" to Sirius marine weather...and found their HF radio to be more reliable overall, and then all they used once south of St. Marteen.....

So, again, while I appreciate your observations, please understand that they are not the only viable experiences out there, and as long as someone knows what they're doing, in my opinon, are not typical....


Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail View Post
5. - Also all the SSB weather information is on a "Scheduled Broadcast time" and if you miss the broadcast or cannot receive the broadcast then you have to wait 6 hours or 12 hours to get the next scheduled broadcast.
- - Finally, weather via the internet is "right now" available, anytime and anywhere you can receive a Wifi or Cell phone data signal. And that makes such a huge difference that I firmly believe - that for cruisers who are not heading out around the world and/ crossing big oceans, SSB installations are becoming a thing of the past just like having to know Morse Code in order to get your HAM license.
Understand the desire for some to have weather "on-demand", but since the data / forecasts are only done every 6 hours (or every 3 hours, when the tropical system is close to landfall), you may get a weather forecast "now" but please understand that it isn't a "now" forecast!!!!

Also, with WeFax charts out of NMG transmitted almost continually and the Tropical analysis at least every 6 hours, and the voice weather out of NMN and NMG every 4 - 6 hours, and Voice weather out of WLO every few hours, and WeFax out of NMF.....and SITOR out of NMF 4 times a day...and the Brazilian WeFax, and the Hurricane Center's "Hurricane Net".....AND with NAVTEX being transmitted continously.....
I cannot see how making yourself available at least once or twice a day, on someone else's well published schedule is a problem???
I mean if you're trying to get vital weather info / forecasts, can't a cruiser remember to do that???
Yes, I know I'm more of a voyager than a cruiser.....venturing offshore for long distances, etc. where a daily routine is more common.....but, if it's hurricane season and I want to get high-qualty weather, I'd make my self available when the forecast was.....
{Oh, and BTW, if you wish to spend the $$$ on a stand-alone WeFax unit as I have, it will turn itself on and receive the specific charts that you're interested in, completely unattended......this is why I upgraded from my old Alden to my new Furuno FAX-408, since my Alden's automatic mode no longer worked.....
But, even if you've just got a laptop and an HF receiver, you can set-up the program to download wefax's when you're away.....
None of this is any more complicated than Skype, etc....}


Well, so much for not wanting to drift the thread further, huh???
Janice, sorry about that....and I'll not post more, here in this thread, about weather, HF comms, etc.


Fair winds to all...


John
s/v Annie Laurie
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Old 07-09-2010, 07:09   #59
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osirisail,
. . . Perhaps we will always diagree on this, but that's life....
No worries here, my friend!!!!
But.....('ya know there's always a "but" coming from me.....
. . . .
I have personally used a small portable HF receiver (with a cheap piece of wire throw out a hatch) to receive HF weather broadcasts.....in the Caribbean, etc.....
Total investment about $120....

Fair winds to all... John s/v Annie Laurie
It is a major mistake to assume that "Anything" on the internet is a fact. Especially in forums - Everything is opinion based on personal experience and/or political slant. Facts really do not exist on the internet as they can be altered by the poster and/or photo-shopped one way or another. I never post facts, I always post opinion based on my view and interpretation of reality. Yours is obviously different and several of your points are extremely valuable.
- - ** The piece about the small HF receivers is very excellent and I have advised those heading off into the oceans and elsewhere - and who do not have the money for an HF system - to purchase a "world-band" receiver and hook it up to their computer with JVComm. There is more to it than just doing that, but it is a great way to listen in on "nets" and get basic charts. West Marine and other discount electronic stores have some excellent world-band receivers.
- - But this discussion is getting into the realm of "Sextant versus GPS Navigation" and like sex and politics is an area of never ending disagreements.
- - As to the original discussion of places in the Caribbean to "hide" or avoid hurricanes, I still contend that being "out of the Zone" is the best and easiest option. Best Places are Grenada; Trinidad; Venezuela; Cartagena; Panama and the Rio Dulce. For those not willing or able to get out of the zone there is Luperon; Salinas; and haulouts in Puerto Rico; the Virgins and other islands.
- - Beyond that, anybody staying in the "zone/box" is taking a chance that any storms will not be a direct hit (inside 50nm). Given the large size of the Caribbean Basin the probabilities of taking a direct hit are statistically small enough that many hundreds, if not thousands, of boats do not leave the "box."
- - As with all things in cruising, it is the responsibility of the individual or family on the boat to decide what they want to do. Relying on any government bureaucrat/agency or other individual not on the boat to tell you what you should do can be fatal at worst and highly destructive to your boat at best.
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Old 07-09-2010, 07:37   #60
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All this interesting and relevant to what cruisers need to know, but it's straying further and further from the OP's question. If one of you two would like to create a new thread, that would fine, but for now, let's get back to the topic of "Best Caribbean Location for Hurricane Season".

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