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Old 07-04-2015, 11:25   #76
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

No, I will not sell the house, but rent it out. And no, I won't be buying a new boat, a used one is enough. That's why at the end of the day I think the Lagoon 380 is the way to go.
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Old 07-04-2015, 12:18   #77
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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I have exactly the opposite experience after buying two new French cats in pretty much every comment above.
As for the ops question, there's a pretty good thread on here comparing the L380,39 and 400. In short the 380 has similar accommodation to the 39 and similar sail area. The 400 a bit more and a bit more payload. The 380 is 7t, 39 11t and 400 10t. From those figures I'd guess the 39 would be a bit slower and talking with Django on here who has spent a bit of time on both I think he agrees and could shed some more light on the differences.
Thanks for suggesting that link! Very informative reading!
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Old 07-04-2015, 13:43   #78
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

Perhaps we have different understandings. What I mean is that the majority of people we have met while we have been sailing (from the coast of Australia westwards to as far as the Caribbean), travel for the sheer fun and interest of sailing / travelling. A few sail to abdicate land based responsibilities - fed up with red tape, taxes etc - while others have a fixed plan to travel from A to B to C etc in a given time frame and often a given budget. The stage of their lives is irrelevant as they undertake their trip when they are able.
Besides these, there shall be the occassional individuals who have no rhyme or reason to sail and don't know why they are sailing even and have no real plans. These are the ones that I find unusual.
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Old 07-04-2015, 14:59   #79
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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My goodness.... you have got it bad. Pigeon holing people - is there a touch of sadness or jealousy here?
We started cruising full time in the mid-90's. It was neither too late nor too soon. It was when we felt ready, and not according to some creed. Our children were born whilst sailing.
The people we have met sailing; all have been very different. Rarely has anyone been nutty - plans vary as well. Some have a two year target whilst others just wander, with others falling inbetween. Good wishes to them all.
;-)

Not all that much.

(OK, maybe there is a shade of jealousy as we are in Las Palmas and I think I might prefer West Indies at this time of the year!)

More seriously though.

You know you meet say 100+ cruisers then you start having a generalised view of the pack. Sure, at this point your generalised views are soft-edged and pretty useless in single cases.

And all of us are single cases.

I have seen very many young cruisers and very many old cruisers, effective.

I have seen very many mid-age cruisers' dreams go to pieces after a year or two due to plenty of reasons, mostly due to some sort of nearly complete lack of touch with cruising reality. And cruising reality is not different from land-life reality: if you are filthy rich (or an independent profession: an artist, an investor, etc) then you can retire at any point.

I am happy for everybody who is lucky enough to retire at 40. I am also happy for everybody who, having considered their funds, skills and needs, has not.

There is no one recipe for happiness. There is no one truth to rule them all. I talk from my experience and you talk from yours. Other members here read and see each of the views from their particular perspective. Agora. Forum.

100% fine and useful set up, in my book.

Love,
b.
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Old 07-04-2015, 15:26   #80
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

Yup, I can agree with that.
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Old 07-04-2015, 20:46   #81
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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In case of sailors effectively sailing around the world? It is just an impression. Most of those we have met were actually people driving along their very well set up road-plans.

In case of liveaboards, you may be closer to some truth. It seems many liveaboards are people who either did not make it in the society (dropouts, misfits, etc.), or else those who are no longer asked by the society to provide services (retirees, rentiers, etc). Both misfitting and retiring are in fact seen as major life events by many psycho- and sociologists.

We had comfortable lives on shore. We stopped working and went on to sailing and then on to living aboard. There was no "giving up" of jobs or "careers" much as they were seen by others as "well paid". We simply stopped doing what we were doing and started doing something else.

If I were to go now, I would not. I think 40 and above is not the time to change things. Nor do I think that special life events like disappointment in work, family or society are a good reason to start cruising/sailing/starting an organic food business. If your (it is a generic, not personal, your) life, family or society are not like what you want them to be, go ahead and change them. Show what you are made of. Running away is easy, and so repetitive.

15 is too young. 25 is about the best time. At 35 you will know what you want and you will have 15 maybe 25 years to get there. Then you will be old and wise and retired and you will have the second chance. That's to say, if you live that long, and if your health and stamina let you go. For very often, it is too late: you are dead or you are spent.

You do have persistence and you do have sense of humour. That's two assets already. If you add some wise financial decisions and some perseverance, you will have a hell of a time cruising, one day.

Listen to everything. Then make your own decisions. Remember you will not be living our lives, you will be living yours. Look at your circumstances, finances, skills and dreams. Live your life. If you are looking for, you have already given yourself the license to try.

Burn no bridges. Abuse the gaps in the system. Sail your own wind.

b.
Some sobriety is necessary, and appreciated. May I ask what your definition of "liveaboards" is? People who simply live on board a boat but do not travel? I may be misinterpreting but do find your general tone here rather excessively conventional and excessively landlife centric. There are those of us for whom life at sea is simply the pattern of being which most accords with their nature. Your apparent characterisation of it is as somehow a kind of well planned career bracketed glory lap or else a complete collapse misses out a whole class of beings who live at sea, and indeed those who are in my view the most interesting, and the closest to those whom I consider to be my cohort of fellows: the long ranging citizens of the sea. There is an atmosphere about them which is unmistakeable, and clear to me. They are as diverse as any group can be who still may be called a group. And it is a constituency of warmth, resourcefulness, self reliance, courage, easy loyalty, instant and unfailingly enthusiastic mutual aid, profound competence and knowledge of our chosen realm. There are pretenders and aspirants to this group, but in the wild places where one finds them, in a subsidiary bay at Nuku Hiva, perhaps, or at anchor at Beveridge reef, or Ushuaia, or at the bar by the roads at Vuda point, they are to be found who are not fake, and cannot be faked, and are the most true in themselves people I have ever known. Perhaps you may call these folk, who do not simply set out to race, or "circumnavigate" or whatever particular land based fantasy others might follow out to sea before heading back to their "real" shore lives; perhaps you may call them misfits. They wouldn't care if you did. But no persons I have ever met are less deserving of that term. They fit into their world better than any I've ever met on land, bar perhaps farmers of the old style, or similar. Not all who wander are lost, mate.
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Old 08-04-2015, 10:00   #82
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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Originally Posted by Muckle Flugga View Post

(...)

May I ask what your definition of "liveaboards" is?

(...)
Liveaboards are people who live aboard.

Cheers,
b.
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Old 08-04-2015, 10:03   #83
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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Liveaboards are people who live aboard.

Cheers,
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Well then your characterisation of them as "mostly" "dropouts, misfits etc." and "people who did not make it in the [sic] society" deserves the response I gave it above.
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Old 08-04-2015, 14:51   #84
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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Well then your characterisation of them as "mostly" "dropouts, misfits etc." and "people who did not make it in the [sic] society" deserves the response I gave it above.
OK, you quoted me but you really used just the bitter-most snippets. Below is what I have actually said.

"...In case of liveaboards, you may be closer to some truth. It seems many liveaboards are people who either did not make it in the society (dropouts, misfits, etc.), or else those who are no longer asked by the society to provide services (retirees, rentiers, etc). Both misfitting and retiring are in fact seen as major life events by many psycho- and sociologists..."

This is a forum and we are free to have our individual and experience-driven opinions. If you find it that my opinions are not in agreement with your experiences then I find it all natural. I would find it surprising and uncomfortable if all opinions were the same. This would leave no space for questions and conversations.

BTW If we were to write a play, nobody would come to watch it. We may have to hire that third guy to bring in some fun. Chaplin perhaps. What say you?

Regards, love,
b.
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Old 08-04-2015, 15:03   #85
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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OK, you quoted me but you really used just the bitter-most snippets. Below is what I have actually said.

"...In case of liveaboards, you may be closer to some truth. It seems many liveaboards are people who either did not make it in the society (dropouts, misfits, etc.), or else those who are no longer asked by the society to provide services (retirees, rentiers, etc). Both misfitting and retiring are in fact seen as major life events by many psycho- and sociologists..."
Funny, but I don't fine this at all offensive. Seems like a reasonable observation to me.

Lets face it, anyone who ventures off the beaten path has got to be a "misfit". Living on a small boat is already an odd-ball choice. Dropping out and venturing over the horizon, or down the coast, in a small boat is downright weird.

I like being a misfit .
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Old 08-04-2015, 15:10   #86
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

I bet some boaters are way less of misfits than they like to believe themselves to be.

Some are easy to spot because they have flags or tee shirts with "misfits" etc on them.
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Old 08-04-2015, 15:16   #87
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

I guess we are dropouts: at least, we were on the white picket fence and 2.5 kids path, but realized we aren't that inspired to have kids and a boat is more fun than a house with a white picket fence.
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Old 08-04-2015, 16:44   #88
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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I have a Hayabusa that I can get up to 160 mph at Infineon after the carousel. I can scape my elbow sliding it around the corners.
I call BS.

Show us a pic of this Hayabusa because on any Hayabusa I've seen you'd have decked out and be on your backside well before getting your elbow down. And what are these magical tyres you've got that give you that much sidegrip? MotoGP slicks? You'll note that not everyone in Grand Prix gets their elbow down, on proper racebikes on proper tyres ... but you do? On your Hayabusa?

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!

Pics please, and I'll happily eat humble pie.
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Old 08-04-2015, 20:22   #89
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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OK, you quoted me but you really used just the bitter-most snippets. Below is what I have actually said.

"...In case of liveaboards, you may be closer to some truth. It seems many liveaboards are people who either did not make it in the society (dropouts, misfits, etc.), or else those who are no longer asked by the society to provide services (retirees, rentiers, etc). Both misfitting and retiring are in fact seen as major life events by many psycho- and sociologists..."

This is a forum and we are free to have our individual and experience-driven opinions. If you find it that my opinions are not in agreement with your experiences then I find it all natural. I would find it surprising and uncomfortable if all opinions were the same. This would leave no space for questions and conversations.

BTW If we were to write a play, nobody would come to watch it. We may have to hire that third guy to bring in some fun. Chaplin perhaps. What say you?

Regards, love,
b.
Well of course. However, of course, I did indeed quote the entire post beyond merely that paragraph in my earlier post. Still, the perspective that people who choose a life at sea are essentially "dropouts" and "misfits" essentially devalues the notion of a sea based life, and can only be defended from the perspective of a person whose mind has never accepted that other than conventional land based life plans constitute such worlds wherein it is reasonable to say one may "fit". One may just as easily say that those who choose to remain trapped in the shore based games the majority actually feel trapped in like ill fitting clothes are the ones who have failed to shed their state of misfitting. For most of the people I have ever met on land are dissatisfied with their lives in some profound way, but unwilling or unable to do something about it, which might make these lives of "quiet desperation" into ones in which they feel more genuine or "authentic" as the existentialists would have it. Of course, few of them would be able to make it in a life at sea. To do so and be content is an extraordinary level of success whose inherent value you seem not to have recognised. I have, in short, met far more and far more profound "misfits" ashore, busily conforming to worlds and lives which make them miserable. And I have met the most profoundly "fitting" and self possessed, authentic persons I have ever met, at sea. Not an easy road to take, and not all make it or should even try. But your seeming dismissal of such a mode of being in terms which solely refer to land based life as being the arbiter of authenticity (so, if not dropouts and misfits, then those no longer useful, to give credit to the whole paragraph as you wish) is strange and rather interesting, given the number of posts you have expended on these pages, for example. How much are you protesting?

As to your suggestion about plays. Funnily, I used to write them. They generally sold out, particularly as the run went on. Do you think every popular play is a comedy? Actually, very few are…

And as for questions and conversations, well of course But then, this is precisely what is happening, no? I am questioning your position, which you put out there in a public forum specifically dedicated to the mode of being you are critiqueing, and we are conversing about it.

Best regards of course.
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Old 08-04-2015, 21:24   #90
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Re: Quit your job and live on a boat in the Caribbean

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(...) Still, the perspective that people who choose a life at sea are essentially "dropouts" and "misfits" essentially devalues the notion of a sea based life (...)
Dear Muckle,

This is what you may have read but this is not what I wrote. Let me expand on my view.

I said dropouts, misfits, retirees, rentiers. Yes. I stick with this. Major (not only) groups of liveaboards. This is how I see it where I am (Las Palmas). This is how I saw it too in Auckland, Papeete, Numea and Richards Bay (to name a few).

If you find this 'devaluing' (your wording, not mine) then that's that for you.

I do not see dropouts not misfits as 'devalued' (whatever this could mean). Many of my friends are dropouts and misfits and, in fact, it would be correct to say the same about me and my crew, much as we are what we are because that's what we elected to be.

Not everyone has to be what the society asks them to be and this fact does not make such a person less valuable. In fact, as we know from arts, history and science, many misfits and dropout created extra value that actually enriched the society that rejected them (or which let them slip away).

Just look at creativity and input from gay people. Many societies found/find them misfit and many gay people, for social reasons, in social terms, dropped out.

Now do you see such people as of less value?

I do not. I look at what they do and how they do it and I find them as valuable as any other person in the society that rejects them.

So, as you can see, using words 'misfit' and 'dropout' as devaluing is one vision, but not the only, nor the better one.

Unless you want to tell me some visions are better than others. To which I would actually disagree ;-)

I am afraid we have bored the public to death.

I buy you a drink now. Peace?

Love,
b.
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