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Old 04-11-2010, 07:44   #16
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Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
I too wish I'd done it in my 20's.... back then a 30ftr (new) cost around 2K GBP... a 2 bed semi was 3K... my annual income was 4.5K.... but like a wally I got married instead... ahh well.
Buy a boat and go sailing my friend.... its a lot cheaper and easier to get out of if you find you've made a mistake...
As to costs... forget the $100,000... that's way over the top... that's what 'wrinklies' look at as a starting point for all the unnecessary toys and extras they've been BS'd into thinking they cannot do without... like Chart plotters and Radar...
Ever noticed some of the strongest supporters on here are those who write programs or sell them...
You can pick up a perfectly good basic 30ft boat for $5-10K... another 5K to set up minor improvements like roller furling gear... keep your hank on sails and just put slides where the hanks went..
Get a boat with a tiller... forget the poseurs wheel... you've more control and the tiller pilots less than $500... a hand held GPS, a flare pack and a good inflatable.
As for an engine... if the inboards knackered get rid of it and get a 5-9hp outboard... its all you need... oh and some books for when your becalmed.
One important thing you'll learn out there is patience... its only the 'Institutionalised' who have this need to keep a schedule... a sailor does just that.. he sails.. and when there's no wind he sorts out maintenance issues, reads, sleeps and eats till the wind comes again.
Good character building stuff....
Forget the spoilt brats on here and GO FOR IT

PS; Another possible reason for the high starter quotes is possibly to try and maintain boat prices in this 'Buyers Market'... talk to people like Zeehag, Shane etc who are taking the "Boat Trash" route.
Boatman (another privileged background rebel)
Well, concerning budgets, I don't agree that anyone is trying to talk up boat prices here. I am not aware that anyone is selling or particularly cares.

A budget for a couple of years of cruising can vary from probably $3,000 to infinity. It is certainly possible to do it in a $10,000, 30 foot boat, and it has been done. Boatman may be right in that most of us are able to afford much better boats than that and are a little spoiled. Still, I would not particularly want to go around the world in a $10,000, 30 foot boat with hank-on sails, and it will be considerably less safe than in something a little better than that. Nor would I want to live on such a boat for several years. It can be done of course.

If you go to something even a little better you are quickly in $40k to $50k territory, then you need to refit and equip it, which even if you keep it extremely simple is going to be a bit of money. Then if you need only $1,000 a month for current expenses and repairs, that's already $24,000 for two years. $100,000 is not a lot of money for two years of cruising, including your capital expense into the boat. I do stand by my point that do it for less than that you will have to live a damned spartan life. Which is not -- ! -- to say that it can't be done!

If it were my son proposing to do this, at your age, I would not want him in a boat less than about 36 feet. But I would not hesitate to give him some money to supplement what he had earned, strictly on the condition, however, that he had worked his a*s off for a few years ahead of time.

Then I would ask him to take me with him.
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Old 04-11-2010, 07:56   #17
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The great thing about real world experience and self confidence born out of traveling and working on the water on or around boats is when you decide to try the corperate world you can be fearless knowing you can always be a boat bum again.

Those who start out in debt and corperate life are usually afraid to upset the status quo for fear of getting sacked.
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Old 04-11-2010, 08:19   #18
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Both Dockhead and Boatman make some excellent points here. As a young guy, your 'elbow room' is decidedly less than it is for people who've already sorted out the things they 'need' in order to feel satisfaction and/or comfort. That's not a dig at anyone here, not in the slightest. My grandpa has an entire two car, two deep garage packed with hardware, tools and all manner of things that he's accumulated over his life that he's needed for maintaining his farm gear, house and personal use vehicles. If you tried telling him he could get away with a twelve drawer snap-on rolling toolbox, he'd give you the patient "yeah, ok kid" and send your ignorant self on your sorry way. Because he *knows* that he needs all of that stuff. And he actually does.

But that's part of the fun of being young, I think. You don't really understand how much you 'need' yet. That's part of what growing up/older is all about, realizing just how much crap there is to deal with in this world, and slowly-but-surely coming to the realization that it's a monstrous task just to keep things from falling apart when you go to sleep at night.

I like boatman's suggestion that simplest is best. I mean, if you've got the money then there's no reason not to get a nicer $50k boat with a couple dimes worth of upgrades, but there's also nothing wrong with getting a little plastic bottle and floating your way to victory, blissfully ignorant of all those things you 'need.'

That said, I'm not advocating blind, caution-to-the-wind arrogance here. I was out by myself for eighty days during my last voyage, and I've gotta tell you that a lot of crap happens in that time even if you do a bang-up job in preparation. So be prepared. Bring knowledge sources for when you get in over your head. Be sure to prepare your seamanship skills with plenty of practice in local bays before setting out on your first long-distance trip. Talk with people in similar sized boats about what they think is important/necessary and see if you've already considered it.

But the most important part of all is that you go out and do it. Even if it turns out that it's not for you, you have to get out there and give it a try, otherwise you'll be kicking yourself for the rest of your life just like you kick yourself over that girl you never got with in high school. That crap stays with you until you croak, and it turns out it ain't that hard to find out if it was a good idea or not.
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Old 04-11-2010, 08:25   #19
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Thanks NQL....
That beat my post hands down...
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Old 04-11-2010, 08:43   #20
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Here's a couple that did it and illustrates NQL's point pretty well.

The Adventures of Tiny Bubbles

PSC25's now seem to be priced at 4-5x what they were 5 years ago but there's always another solid boat out there which can be had for a song.

MarkJ made some *very good points* too which you'd probably do well to grapple with a bit more.

One of the best things about going young is that it is a hell of a lot easier to make money as you travel when you're young -- if you are willing to get your hands dirty you can work outside of the formal economy (laborer, barback, construction, housepainter, handiman, etc).

One thing you don't want to do at your age is get bogged down by a project that is too big or too expensive for you. There are such great deals on the market right now, I'd be hesitant to recomend almost ANY project boat. A guy on this board bought a gorgeous well equiped CD27 for 7-8K recently (spinaker, wind vane steering, the whole shebang). That was an estate sale and you'll look long and hard before you find a similar deal, but the point is that most project boats will cost you way more than a solid boat bought at a bargain price -- and you'll usually wind up with far less. So, chose your dream wisely.

Luck,
M
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Old 04-11-2010, 16:29   #21
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But the most important part of all is that you go out and do it. Even if it turns out that it's not for you, you have to get out there and give it a try, otherwise you'll be kicking yourself for the rest of your life just like you kick yourself over that girl you never got with in high school. That crap stays with you until you croak, and it turns out it ain't that hard to find out if it was a good idea or not.
Truer words were never spoken. You will regret the things you never did or never tried, far more, like 1000x more, than the things you did try and didn't turn out so well.
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Old 04-11-2010, 16:47   #22
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. . . One thing you don't want to do at your age is get bogged down by a project that is too big or too expensive for you. There are such great deals on the market right now, I'd be hesitant to recomend almost ANY project boat. A guy on this board bought a gorgeous well equiped CD27 for 7-8K recently (spinaker, wind vane steering, the whole shebang). . . . So, chose your dream wisely. Luck, M
This is where the CF thread Cruising on $500 / Month
comes in handy. A rather long discussion but the essence is that you can choose where you want to enter the field - minimal start up costs and long fixing/prep labor hours; or someplace where the boat is more cruiser ready and less time is needed to get going on your way.
- - The whole concept of cost of cruising is generally a discussion of personal lifestyle choices. The higher your lifestyle comfort level the more financial resources you will have to have.
- - Beyond mandated minimum safety equipment, this is where you will be starting to take charge of your life - you can/will decide what you want for safety and convenience and how much "comfort" you need to make your journey an adventure rather than a survival ordeal.
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Old 04-11-2010, 22:17   #23
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Great reply boatman61!
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Old 04-11-2010, 22:19   #24
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I meant that seriously. Oops, hope it didn't sound too smart A.
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:09   #25
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College educated mid-20's guy.

If it doesn't work out, no big deal. But if you get a job, get a wife, get a house, get some kids and get a lot of debt you may never go.
That is exactly what could happen if you don't do it now. Or if you get lucky, you find a partner that shares same interests and you both enjoy this lifestyle. Even raising kids on the boat is fun. The kids raised on the boats are mostly above avg. Think what kind of skills would they develop! I wish I could go back 20 years and do it. My kids would be much more adventurous and would not think their mom is crazy for leaving a job and living on the boat. But it is never late. I am 40 and feel like I belong to younger crowd here.
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:46   #26
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I'm a college-educated mid 20's guy from the South. I had me a bit of a "American Beauty Kevin Spacey" moment - saw where my life was taking me and decided to get off that train.

Come from money - saw it destroy everything in the family...
1 - Isn't this the movie where Kevin Spacey slept with his daughter's friend? I wouldn't be advertising that on the net; if you're only twenty something, your daughter's friend is probably jailbait....

2 - I hope you will have a great time doing it... You remind me of the story about the indian prince who fell in love with the beggar girl....
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:47   #27
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I think it is a great idea to go while you are young! It is nice to have money but there is something to be said about experiencing life before life weighs you down. I am surprised by how many people are out here "cruising" that are so old they can barely get on and off a boat at dock never mind make passages. For them cruising is parking a boat in a marina (in a foreign country) and scheduling, square dancing, dock parties, horseshoes, etc. I am sure that it seemed like a good idea to them to wait until there mid to late 60's before cutting the dock lines and maybe they still justify that but I am not all that convinced that starting a life of cruising at that age is such a good idea. They have plenty of money so some could say they planned well but I bet most of them would trade there money for there youth....just a thought.
Good luck whatever you decide.
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:50   #28
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Maby , as one said, You cant use Sailing as a "Runaway".. well hell, thats Exactly waht im going to do and ENJOY it as well..
As for "Throwing Life away" LOL.. you aint had one YET.. Go for it. You are still deciding WHERE you want to go.. your Not changing anything, your just Choosing/Adjusting a new Direction for your life AND it may Change again.. Hell, I wish i had made This choice befor I was 60 frikkin 3

DO IT NOW.. DO IT NOW.. Dont let ANYONE tell you you have to do This first or That first.. hell, if you want to become a frikkin floating Wino .... then DO IT and have a ball..

I'll watch.. and have a drink with ya when ya get near Naples after next july or so..
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