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Old 15-07-2017, 12:52   #16
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Re: Liveavoard for a year, new to the forum

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Originally Posted by Rorzech View Post
You'll need $2,000.00 to get though Panama canal and you get half that back when you get through. It might be more now, so check it out. In French Polynesia you must have a plane ticket for home, Or a big cash deposit that you get refunded when you leave. Check on that also. These are a couple of the large expenses that I've heard people discussing in the past. This Forum is a great place for getting advice. I'm sure there are hundreds of expenses just waiting for you, once you get out there in the wild blue yonder .


Wow Panama is expensive.. I'll probably have to take out a loan if I want to leave with enough for that. In the Pacific islands I've heard that if my boat's value is enough that it could substitute for the cash deposit, I'd be curious to know for sure. I'm also curious as to whether or not getting a seaman's book will help smooth some of these hurdles..
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Old 15-07-2017, 14:31   #17
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Re: Liveavoard for a year, new to the forum

Would you trust signing you boat over to a banana republic who could take it if they decide that they want the cash "NOW" or the boat. Just like the banks can do? It's all in the fine print. You're in S Africa , You could skoot over to, and around Cape Horn in no time. Theres Lots to see along those coasts and good fishing also. Theres always time to take in the Caribbean on the flip side of your trip. You won't have to deal with any Venezuelan Pirates either.
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Old 15-07-2017, 19:46   #18
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Re: Liveavoard for a year, new to the forum

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Originally Posted by Rorzech View Post
Would you trust signing you boat over to a banana republic who could take it if they decide that they want the cash "NOW" or the boat. Just like the banks can do? It's all in the fine print. You're in S Africa , You could skoot over to, and around Cape Horn in no time. Theres Lots to see along those coasts and good fishing also. Theres always time to take in the Caribbean on the flip side of your trip. You won't have to deal with any Venezuelan Pirates either.


Very true... It's just that I've been sailing cold harsh waters for a while now and I feel the need to head towards the equator. Thank you for the advice, I'll see what I can do about getting extra cash before I go
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Old 15-07-2017, 20:01   #19
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Re: Liveavoard for a year, new to the forum

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Be careful and try to collect your wages at least once week. Someday you will show up with scrub brush in hand only to view an empty slip. Now where did the boat and your wages go?


Good point. I'll make sure I get paid, thank you.
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Old 16-07-2017, 09:15   #20
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Re: Liveavoard for a year, new to the forum

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Thank you b, everything you say is very true but unfortunately I have already quit my job and selling my belongings to save up initial cash.. cost of living in Cape Town is high compared to wages so I wasn't managing to save enough money at my job. I am apprentice knife maker at the moment to help with monthly costs while I still get time to work on my boat. Realistically I'll be leaving from here with 1,000 USD in my pocket... I'll have to work hard and be smart to make it work from there, but I'm confident I can make it happen.
We left (Europe) in 2003 with about 15k on the pile. We may be some of the very low end (needs and costs) of the sailing shelf - all time at anchor, no bars nor restaurants, non-smokers, non-drinkers, still non-saints). We burned thru about 7k between Europe and NZ. I worked in NZ but I did not save anything, just paid the marina, the food and the bottom paint. That was 2003 money, divide by 1.5 for today's price level. Subtract 30% for two onboard. Makes about 7k to make it from RSA to midway, imho. Onwards, it is less expensive only if you pass by Australia. But if you do, why leave RSA.

Given our accumulated skills and experience and language ability (we speak all of the languages required along the way) I would not make an attempt at another go with less than 10k (if going it solo) and a boat in a top notch condition (news sails, 100% reliable engine, 6 coats of Micron 66 ;-) etc.) . Mind going it solo requires some extra gear, like a quality (and bloody expensive) windvane.

So I am saying you are pulling the trigger too early. But so you are. I bet you will likely keep on rolling it now. Young people are just like that. A benefit, actually, being young.

You can sell top quality handmade knives in Europe or US at 100 to 200 USD apiece. You could build them along the way and ship to buyers on the web. But you must build a brand up first, before you depart. It takes 3 to 5 years to establish some form of internet vendor that can fund your otherwise adventure then for 2 maybe 3 years. You will not be able to do it while sailing.

Have a good long look at how other people in small boats do things. Webb Chiles circumnavigated recently, via RSA. Hope you caught the opportunity to chat. Martin Dolecek is right now in Australia re-attaching his keel to his boat (stranded on Queensland coast, saved by two crocodile dundees and some support from his fans and friends). He has heaps of relative experience and his budget is not all that big either. We met him, he knows too. Etc. All the info is out there. Just read. Or talk to any of the small boats that are going from the Indian into the Atlantic each summer. Some stop at CT. We stopped at Simonstown though.

If you go early, you will either make it, or get stuck (in Brazil, likely). How good is your Portuguese? Getting stuck is not bad either if you enjoy the local landscape, except getting stuck is not sailing.

I would hold it up in RSA, work hard (travel to work out, if you have to), build a minimum budget, then go. But I fully understand people who just go. Sometimes the itch is just so big. Mine was.

I hope you will let us know how it goes. People who come to the forum always benefit most from first hand experience of others in the same situation. So PLS do post updates on how it goes, where you are, and how you are dealing with the challenges.

PS We may meet in the West Indies this winter. We are planning to be there again hopefully from December onwards.

Big hug,
from LPGC,
barnakiel
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Old 16-07-2017, 23:00   #21
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Re: Liveavoard for a year, new to the forum

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We left (Europe) in 2003 with about 15k on the pile. We may be some of the very low end (needs and costs) of the sailing shelf - all time at anchor, no bars nor restaurants, non-smokers, non-drinkers, still non-saints). We burned thru about 7k between Europe and NZ. I worked in NZ but I did not save anything, just paid the marina, the food and the bottom paint. That was 2003 money, divide by 1.5 for today's price level. Subtract 30% for two onboard. Makes about 7k to make it from RSA to midway, imho. Onwards, it is less expensive only if you pass by Australia. But if you do, why leave RSA.

Given our accumulated skills and experience and language ability (we speak all of the languages required along the way) I would not make an attempt at another go with less than 10k (if going it solo) and a boat in a top notch condition (news sails, 100% reliable engine, 6 coats of Micron 66 ;-) etc.) . Mind going it solo requires some extra gear, like a quality (and bloody expensive) windvane.

So I am saying you are pulling the trigger too early. But so you are. I bet you will likely keep on rolling it now. Young people are just like that. A benefit, actually, being young.

You can sell top quality handmade knives in Europe or US at 100 to 200 USD apiece. You could build them along the way and ship to buyers on the web. But you must build a brand up first, before you depart. It takes 3 to 5 years to establish some form of internet vendor that can fund your otherwise adventure then for 2 maybe 3 years. You will not be able to do it while sailing.

Have a good long look at how other people in small boats do things. Webb Chiles circumnavigated recently, via RSA. Hope you caught the opportunity to chat. Martin Dolecek is right now in Australia re-attaching his keel to his boat (stranded on Queensland coast, saved by two crocodile dundees and some support from his fans and friends). He has heaps of relative experience and his budget is not all that big either. We met him, he knows too. Etc. All the info is out there. Just read. Or talk to any of the small boats that are going from the Indian into the Atlantic each summer. Some stop at CT. We stopped at Simonstown though.

If you go early, you will either make it, or get stuck (in Brazil, likely). How good is your Portuguese? Getting stuck is not bad either if you enjoy the local landscape, except getting stuck is not sailing.

I would hold it up in RSA, work hard (travel to work out, if you have to), build a minimum budget, then go. But I fully understand people who just go. Sometimes the itch is just so big. Mine was.

I hope you will let us know how it goes. People who come to the forum always benefit most from first hand experience of others in the same situation. So PLS do post updates on how it goes, where you are, and how you are dealing with the challenges.

PS We may meet in the West Indies this winter. We are planning to be there again hopefully from December onwards.

Big hug,
from LPGC,
barnakiel


Thank you for this, I really appreciate these insights.
I am a lot more aware now of the fact that I've got a huge job ahead of me.. Luckily I am fluent in Portuguese so if I get stuck in Brazil it won't be too bad.
I did think about selling knives as I travel, but I'll also sell my mooring at the Royal Cape Yacht Club to help me get through Panama. From there, I probably won't afford to run the motor and maybe be living off fish.. but if there are, and I hope there will be some boats by the islands that I can do work for to keep me going from there, then I should be ok.

I will keep posting updates on this thread and my youtube channel as I prep and travel.

Today I'm selling my motorbike so I can buy batteries and AIS, and next month my electrician friend will help me rewire my boat. In the meantime I'll be collecting stainless steel and building my windvane, also filming some videos of me and my boat for my youtube channel... I still remain hopeful that I might gain sponsors..

Thanks again,
We'll chat soon
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Old 17-07-2017, 07:45   #22
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Re: Liveavoard for a year, new to the forum

The Pacific side is cheap unless the French will ask you for their bond. We are EU nationals and so we did not pay any. But I hear some US Americans, Canadians and other strangers are required to place a bond when they sail in. It is somewhat difficult not to as their islands stretch most of the way and they make such great landfalls. I could live there ... but got driven out by nonos (aka noseeums).

Counting on fish is like counting on rain. There may be some, or plenty, or none. Tropics are not exactly where fish abounds. There is very little plankton there. Except maybe closer to Galapagos, where Humboldt drives in. Cocos is plenty, but not very nutritious. Besides, anything green always belongs to someone, as does the fish in the lagoon, so ask before you collect, anything. They always give permission though. They are not like us, rich people of the West, who mostly refuse.

Do get a decent windvane, it is expensive up front, but saves you money along the road. Just look at how many Raymarine APs Webb has burnt down (25 or more?).

In the end it always boils down to 'what there is'. As long as your boat is sound and your skills are there, life out there is better than anything else I know, at least till you hit 40, or so.

Cheers,
b.
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