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Old 06-01-2016, 10:36   #16
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

No. You will smell like old diesel fuel mixed with mildew. So much for promotions. Secondly, houses appreciate over time, boats depreciate. So go get yourself a mortgage and then save for a boat.
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Old 06-01-2016, 10:48   #17
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

possible? yes. easy? no. cheap? yes, but. Finding a live-a-board to rent will be very difficult if not impossible. If you do find one make sure it is not for sale or you might finding yourself looking for a new home on short notice.
You already know life aboard is small spaces and limited storage. If 'professional' means suit and tie I think you might have real problems maintaining your clothing. Best of luck whatever you decide.
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Old 06-01-2016, 11:00   #18
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

For professional clothing, many marinas offer on shore storage where you can keep clothes that might not fit in the hanging lockers of smaller boats.

Check with the marinas you are interested in about any restrictions on size. I was under the impression that the 35' thing was mostly a West Coast issue. Even then, it isn't always enforced. I noticed that when our marina updated their website, they didn't put that information up anymore.

All of that being said, the real thing to ask yourself is if you want to sail or you want to work on a boat. In the super cheap range you may find a treasure, but you are more likely to find a project, in which case you might be better off renting a small apartment and joining a sailing club. Our boat wasn't super cheap, but we did run across a project that kept us from sailing all summer long.
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Old 06-01-2016, 11:57   #19
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

Nothing wrong with sailing sunfish or lasers. That does translate to bigger boats. I learned on a force5 (laser) a long time ago. Bigger boats, you have to use the winches but the theory is the same. Yes you can start slow on the big boats, by just using the jib or mainsail first, practicing with that for a bit, then add the jib and practice trimming at different points of sail.

Docking is always fun to learn and that you can not learn from a book. Lots Practice.

If you want to live on a boat, then for goodness sakes live on a boat. Nothing wrong with that.

Most of boating is fixing the boat in exotic places. So besides sailing, knowing engine mechanics ( changing oil, filters and that raw water impeller), electrical and plumbing are all part of it. As well as a few basic knots, weather, currents, tides, etc. You never really learn it all.

You may find a cheaper boat by visiting each marina and looking at the local bulletin board ( I know, so old fashion). Much better odds of finding a boat at a low price. That's how I found my little Islander 34 for $12k.

The important bits are good hull, engine and rigging. You can learn on blown sails and or buy used sails for a fraction of new. Electrical, plumbing could be shot and its still a good deal. Really any older boat 70's to 2000's will need work.

Edit: BTW the closet space aboard is generally a 18" wide x 48" high locker. It is possible to work professionally from a boat, but wardrobe space is limited. I did it for many years, though with only 10 pairs of shoes .
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Old 06-01-2016, 12:58   #20
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

Buy the smallest boat you can to live on (about 26ft) then buy what is essentially a bare hull (or a new bare hull) and spend a few years refitting it. You will then have your perfect boat and all the skills you need for cruising for the following reasons;
Good quality hulls last for many years it is the machinery and fittings that deteriorate
Nobody (almost) builds 'cruising boats' they build coastal boats with lots of bunks and light weight gear for weekend sailing parties/families
A boat that needs a full refit will be very cheap so no loan needed
If you do your own refit not only do you get a boat in new condition to your spec but you can fix anything that goes wrong and literally know your boat inside out. For cruising that is a big plus.
Buy buying gear a bit at a time you can save loads buy getting items that are on sale or good used stuff (not electronics though!).
By doing work yourself you save a fortune in labour costs as well as learning skills. For example making your own sails from a kit is about half the cost of buying complete. On a 35ft you should save $4-5K just on sails and rigging.
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Old 06-01-2016, 12:58   #21
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

Get in touch and I'll get you some time on a boat -

www.facebook.com/BlueOceanSails
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Old 06-01-2016, 13:35   #22
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

Again, +1 on what sailorchic34 just said. And you can find some SMOKIN deals on boats on Craig's List too. Also, there are even apps & software, which allow you to setup a search engine to alert you via your phone, when it finds what you've set it to look for. Ditto on it emailing you when if finds items for you.
So that you literally have a customized program, sending you messages when it finds the right item for you. And such software has been around for a bunch of years.
Though, honestly, IMO, word of mouth, networking, & sailorchic34's rec's still work the best of any of the methods out there.

But back to the Craig's List thing, I've seen Choice Ranger 33's, with brand new diesels, rigs, & suits of sails, for $10-$12K. And ones outfitted with enough proper cruising gear to take your around the world for $20K. If you added storm shutters, plus a few other offshore items.
Not to mention 40'ers for $15k-25K, again, with great gear... enough to add groceries, & $5K more in gear. Along with a good sea trial to work out the bugs. And then head off to Mexico, the Caribbean or beyond.
So the boat part is eminently doable. As is financing, for "If it's important enough to you you'll find a way. If not, you'll find an excuse".

Also, keep in mind that coming out of college, you aren't obligated to find a job in a field related to your degree. You can find a gig working for a charter boat company, & learn sailing that way, while putting away some cash. Or to step up the ladder a bit higher, crew as a hand on a luxury yacht, again stashing some coin away (see Project Atticus, below).
And or, sign on as crew on many of the yachts which advertise as needing crew. Or get a gig via an agency which places crew for deliveries & the like. On whatever size, type, & location of boat which you specify.

Plus there's 101 other ways to learn to sail, & save some money, while you're young & unencumbered. Heck, just walk the docks any day on the weekends & you'll find a ride. Especially if you have a smile, a good attitude, & a cold 12-pack.
Ditto on hitching rides on racing boats, where you'll learn to sail at a geometric rate, as compared to any other means of sailing. As racers use boats to their full potential, & the crews are looking to use every bit of sailing, personnel, weather, & other knowledge to their advantage. Thus, you learn a lot, in a compressed time frame, if you're paying attention. That, & it's a blast!

To see & read about some other people who followed "alternative" paths after college, click on any of these links:


Sail Around the World. Adventure Travel Documentary Series



Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave22q View Post
possible? yes. easy? no.
On this (the "easy" question), I beg to differ.
cheap? yes, but. Finding a live-a-board to rent will be very difficult if not impossible.
Again, this is a question of mindset. As, if you ask the Universe, very specifically, & graciously for something. Plus are of a mindset that you will get it, then it'll "appear" in your life.
If you do find one make sure it is not for sale or you might finding yourself looking for a new home on short notice.
You already know life aboard is small spaces and limited storage. If 'professional' means suit and tie I think you might have real problems maintaining your clothing. Best of luck whatever you decide.
As to the clothes thing being an issue, that's a cop out. I managed it fine, despite the fact that I was wearing dress clothes 75-100hrs/week, as a Naval Officer. So I had to look impeccable, 24/7, literally.
This, when I had a closet all of 2' wide on my boat.

I kept some clothes on the boat. Some at the marina. Some on the ship. Some in storage. And some in my locker at the gym. And I can't ever recall feeling like it was a juggling act. Even when my girlfriend, a corporate exec., lived 2+ hours away, & I often had to "dress for success" when spending time with her. Given that she had plenty of business, social functions, which pretty much mandated that I wear a tie & a dress shirt, or more.

The thing is, too. In all of these places but my own boat, in order to get a bit of extra storage space for my clothes, all I had to do was to find the right people, & ask them for the space (in the right way). At times, while explaining my situation to them. And at most, it cost me a small locker fee, or to take some new friends that I'd made during the asking for extra space bit, out sailing.
Which was a nice perk, when you're a new face in a big city. And especially when you're working enough hours so that making social contacts is MUCH more restricted than when you have a regular job, with normal hours.

Ergo, Again => => Go For It!
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Old 06-01-2016, 13:43   #23
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roland stockham View Post
Buy the smallest boat you can to live on (about 26ft) then buy what is essentially a bare hull (or a new bare hull) and spend a few years refitting it. You will then have your perfect boat and all the skills you need for cruising for the following reasons;
Good quality hulls last for many years it is the machinery and fittings that deteriorate
Nobody (almost) builds 'cruising boats' they build coastal boats with lots of bunks and light weight gear for weekend sailing parties/families
A boat that needs a full refit will be very cheap so no loan needed
If you do your own refit not only do you get a boat in new condition to your spec but you can fix anything that goes wrong and literally know your boat inside out. For cruising that is a big plus.
Buy buying gear a bit at a time you can save loads buy getting items that are on sale or good used stuff (not electronics though!).
By doing work yourself you save a fortune in labour costs as well as learning skills. For example making your own sails from a kit is about half the cost of buying complete. On a 35ft you should save $4-5K just on sails and rigging.
This, suggestion, is one of the key things which they do in Project Atticus, which I put the links to, in my above post. Both their video series, & their website. Or so it seems thus far, from the videos which I've watched.

The idea, is an old & proven classic. And if you need some ideas for KISS boats, you can start here Atom Voyages - Home
Atom Voyages - Good Old Boats List
And go a bit more upscale, here Mahina Expedition - Selecting A Boat for Offshore Cruising
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Old 06-01-2016, 15:09   #24
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

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Originally Posted by baylorbear View Post
I have been wanting to live on a sailboat for 4-5 years now and have been following some threads on this forum for a while. I am currently looking to graduate in May and have some possible job prospects in the Houston area. After I graduate I plan to travel to the San Juan Islands to get certified up to an ASA 104 certification for bareboat charters. I have experience sailing smaller craft (up to 20') but have never sailed larger boats in salt water. I just wanted to give a little background of where I am at.

If I end up working in central or south Houston, I would like to go straight or move quickly to living on a sailboat (if it is possible). I have no debt coming out of school but I realize it would be hard to get a mortgage on a boat with no hard assets, besides my car, and little money saved up. Is there any way I could rent a sailboat to live on in the area? I would like to go out on weekends and get experience. I figure the boat being my home would allow me to save more than if I rented or owned a boat and had a home on land. I also need to determine if living on a boat is something I would enjoy hence why a rental would be good.

BTW my end goal is working x number of years to save (while living on a boat) then taking a few years off to experience the cruising life while I am young. I know that a good cruising boat can be different from a good dockside liveaboard boat.
Rent an apartment. Living on board is not cheap. Do some research.
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Old 06-01-2016, 16:58   #25
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

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Originally Posted by baylorbear View Post
I have been wanting to live on a sailboat for 4-5 years now and have been following some threads on this forum for a while. I am currently looking to graduate in May and have some possible job prospects in the Houston area. After I graduate I plan to travel to the San Juan Islands to get certified up to an ASA 104 certification for bareboat charters. I have experience sailing smaller craft (up to 20') but have never sailed larger boats in salt water. I just wanted to give a little background of where I am at.

If I end up working in central or south Houston, I would like to go straight or move quickly to living on a sailboat (if it is possible). I have no debt coming out of school but I realize it would be hard to get a mortgage on a boat with no hard assets, besides my car, and little money saved up. Is there any way I could rent a sailboat to live on in the area? I would like to go out on weekends and get experience. I figure the boat being my home would allow me to save more than if I rented or owned a boat and had a home on land. I also need to determine if living on a boat is something I would enjoy hence why a rental would be good.

BTW my end goal is working x number of years to save (while living on a boat) then taking a few years off to experience the cruising life while I am young. I know that a good cruising boat can be different from a good dockside liveaboard boat.
you're one of many first timers here who've asked this question and the first answer i give is a question. the being, are you sure you're even a boat person much less a livaboard person? i ask because you say your only experience is with small boats. boats that don't involve slip fees, expensive maintenance, dealing with marina managers, dock neighbors. i could go on and on about things about owning a boat will have you jumping for joy one moment and ready to swallow a bullet the next.

won't say it doesn't happen but i've never known a boat owner to rent out his boat to a livaboard. i suppose someone leaving the area for an extended period might be interested in doing so but if he really wants to have his boat when he returns he can have it dry stored at relatively little cost. i suppose if an owner were financially stressed to the point that he needs somebody to pay rent in order for him to meet his boat loan payments and slip fees that might work for him but do you really want to live on a boat with a total rental cost approaching the cost of a condo from a financially strapped owner? marine toilets, stoves, refrigerators and such break often enough and cost plenty even when a boat is used occasionally. live on the sucker and imagine how often you'll be calling for help from your landlord, [sealord?], who already doesn't have a nickle to spare.

you're off to a great start in life with a long time to do things right. there are organizations everywhere that for a few hundred bucks will teach you to sail and then for less than a hundred fifty a month will make boats available to you in the twenty to thirty foot range any time and any number of days you want to sail each month depending on availability. i can't begin to count the dollars you'll not be paying for insurance, slip fees, breakage and just plain maintenance by not owning your own boat until you are dead nuts sure you're a boat person. the outfit here is called 'fairwinds sailing club' and they may be one of several across the country. good luck.
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Old 06-01-2016, 19:17   #26
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

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Originally Posted by dwedeking2 View Post
Why not buy a smaller older boat as a interim step?

You'll reap the lower cost of living without going into debt, allow you to test the idea without a large $$ investment, and build up to buying a newer boat with or without financiing.
Excellent advice. Older boats, often in excellent condition, are selling very low these days.

Also, your plan is excellent. By moving directly onto a boat you won't waste any time or money on useless stuff like furniture and appliances. Boat life is sparse. It allows you to focus on what really matters and save your $$$.

You are fortunate to have good weather year round. Living aboard here in Canada is brutal in the winter.
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Old 06-01-2016, 19:22   #27
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

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Originally Posted by baylorbear View Post
Thanks y'all appreciate the advice. I also have noticed that a lot of marinas require 35 foot or more. Because of this I have mostly limited my searching to that size. I wonder if they would be fine with a smaller boat if an owner payed for 35 feet.

Do you all know of any small older boats that are good liveaboards? I would like something with some performace but a more stable slower boat may be better for comfort and for learning. Also, living in Houston with no AC in the summer would be unbearable so it would definitely need some amenities.
I suggest a Pearson 35 (1970's) or Hunter 34 (1980's). No reason you can't add AC to any boat. I had a Hunter 35.5 with AC...what a pleasure. I should never have sold that boat. If its in your budget, you might want to add that to your list, but the Hunter Legend 35.5 (1990's) is a lot more $$$. I hope at least I've given you a place to start.

And finally, go visit some boats. See them in person. Hang out at marinas. If you are polite and honest about your intentions, most owners are happy to show off their boat and give you the royal tour. Best of luck to you.
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Old 06-01-2016, 19:25   #28
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

Quote:
Originally Posted by UNCIVILIZED View Post
Again, +1 on what sailorchic34 just said. And you can find some SMOKIN deals on boats on Craig's List too. Also, there are even apps & software, which allow you to setup a search engine to alert you via your phone, when it finds what you've set it to look for. Ditto on it emailing you when if finds items for you.
So that you literally have a customized program, sending you messages when it finds the right item for you. And such software has been around for a bunch of years.
Though, honestly, IMO, word of mouth, networking, & sailorchic34's rec's still work the best of any of the methods out there.

But back to the Craig's List thing, I've seen Choice Ranger 33's, with brand new diesels, rigs, & suits of sails, for $10-$12K. And ones outfitted with enough proper cruising gear to take your around the world for $20K. If you added storm shutters, plus a few other offshore items.
Not to mention 40'ers for $15k-25K, again, with great gear... enough to add groceries, & $5K more in gear. Along with a good sea trial to work out the bugs. And then head off to Mexico, the Caribbean or beyond.
So the boat part is eminently doable. As is financing, for "If it's important enough to you you'll find a way. If not, you'll find an excuse".

Also, keep in mind that coming out of college, you aren't obligated to find a job in a field related to your degree. You can find a gig working for a charter boat company, & learn sailing that way, while putting away some cash. Or to step up the ladder a bit higher, crew as a hand on a luxury yacht, again stashing some coin away (see Project Atticus, below).
And or, sign on as crew on many of the yachts which advertise as needing crew. Or get a gig via an agency which places crew for deliveries & the like. On whatever size, type, & location of boat which you specify.

Plus there's 101 other ways to learn to sail, & save some money, while you're young & unencumbered. Heck, just walk the docks any day on the weekends & you'll find a ride. Especially if you have a smile, a good attitude, & a cold 12-pack.
Ditto on hitching rides on racing boats, where you'll learn to sail at a geometric rate, as compared to any other means of sailing. As racers use boats to their full potential, & the crews are looking to use every bit of sailing, personnel, weather, & other knowledge to their advantage. Thus, you learn a lot, in a compressed time frame, if you're paying attention. That, & it's a blast!

To see & read about some other people who followed "alternative" paths after college, click on any of these links:


Sail Around the World. Adventure Travel Documentary Series





As to the clothes thing being an issue, that's a cop out. I managed it fine, despite the fact that I was wearing dress clothes 75-100hrs/week, as a Naval Officer. So I had to look impeccable, 24/7, literally.
This, when I had a closet all of 2' wide on my boat.

I kept some clothes on the boat. Some at the marina. Some on the ship. Some in storage. And some in my locker at the gym. And I can't ever recall feeling like it was a juggling act. Even when my girlfriend, a corporate exec., lived 2+ hours away, & I often had to "dress for success" when spending time with her. Given that she had plenty of business, social functions, which pretty much mandated that I wear a tie & a dress shirt, or more.

The thing is, too. In all of these places but my own boat, in order to get a bit of extra storage space for my clothes, all I had to do was to find the right people, & ask them for the space (in the right way). At times, while explaining my situation to them. And at most, it cost me a small locker fee, or to take some new friends that I'd made during the asking for extra space bit, out sailing.
Which was a nice perk, when you're a new face in a big city. And especially when you're working enough hours so that making social contacts is MUCH more restricted than when you have a regular job, with normal hours.

Ergo, Again => => Go For It!
naval officers do their own laundry aboard ship? just asking.
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Old 06-01-2016, 20:44   #29
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

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Originally Posted by hamburking View Post
Excellent advice. Older boats, often in excellent condition, are selling very low these days.

Also, your plan is excellent. By moving directly onto a boat you won't waste any time or money on useless stuff like furniture and appliances. Boat life is sparse. It allows you to focus on what really matters and save your $$$.

You are fortunate to have good weather year round. Living aboard here in Canada is brutal in the winter.
That's what i was thinking. I like spartan living as I already share a room and a small apartment with 4 other people.
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Old 06-01-2016, 20:46   #30
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Re: Is it possible to live aboard a sailboat as a fresh out of college professional?

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Originally Posted by UNCIVILIZED View Post
Again, +1 on what sailorchic34 just said. And you can find some SMOKIN deals on boats on Craig's List too. Also, there are even apps & software, which allow you to setup a search engine to alert you via your phone, when it finds what you've set it to look for. Ditto on it emailing you when if finds items for you.
So that you literally have a customized program, sending you messages when it finds the right item for you. And such software has been around for a bunch of years.
Though, honestly, IMO, word of mouth, networking, & sailorchic34's rec's still work the best of any of the methods out there.

But back to the Craig's List thing, I've seen Choice Ranger 33's, with brand new diesels, rigs, & suits of sails, for $10-$12K. And ones outfitted with enough proper cruising gear to take your around the world for $20K. If you added storm shutters, plus a few other offshore items.
Not to mention 40'ers for $15k-25K, again, with great gear... enough to add groceries, & $5K more in gear. Along with a good sea trial to work out the bugs. And then head off to Mexico, the Caribbean or beyond.
So the boat part is eminently doable. As is financing, for "If it's important enough to you you'll find a way. If not, you'll find an excuse".

Also, keep in mind that coming out of college, you aren't obligated to find a job in a field related to your degree. You can find a gig working for a charter boat company, & learn sailing that way, while putting away some cash. Or to step up the ladder a bit higher, crew as a hand on a luxury yacht, again stashing some coin away (see Project Atticus, below).
And or, sign on as crew on many of the yachts which advertise as needing crew. Or get a gig via an agency which places crew for deliveries & the like. On whatever size, type, & location of boat which you specify.

Plus there's 101 other ways to learn to sail, & save some money, while you're young & unencumbered. Heck, just walk the docks any day on the weekends & you'll find a ride. Especially if you have a smile, a good attitude, & a cold 12-pack.
Ditto on hitching rides on racing boats, where you'll learn to sail at a geometric rate, as compared to any other means of sailing. As racers use boats to their full potential, & the crews are looking to use every bit of sailing, personnel, weather, & other knowledge to their advantage. Thus, you learn a lot, in a compressed time frame, if you're paying attention. That, & it's a blast!

To see & read about some other people who followed "alternative" paths after college, click on any of these links:


Sail Around the World. Adventure Travel Documentary Series





As to the clothes thing being an issue, that's a cop out. I managed it fine, despite the fact that I was wearing dress clothes 75-100hrs/week, as a Naval Officer. So I had to look impeccable, 24/7, literally.
This, when I had a closet all of 2' wide on my boat.

I kept some clothes on the boat. Some at the marina. Some on the ship. Some in storage. And some in my locker at the gym. And I can't ever recall feeling like it was a juggling act. Even when my girlfriend, a corporate exec., lived 2+ hours away, & I often had to "dress for success" when spending time with her. Given that she had plenty of business, social functions, which pretty much mandated that I wear a tie & a dress shirt, or more.

The thing is, too. In all of these places but my own boat, in order to get a bit of extra storage space for my clothes, all I had to do was to find the right people, & ask them for the space (in the right way). At times, while explaining my situation to them. And at most, it cost me a small locker fee, or to take some new friends that I'd made during the asking for extra space bit, out sailing.
Which was a nice perk, when you're a new face in a big city. And especially when you're working enough hours so that making social contacts is MUCH more restricted than when you have a regular job, with normal hours.

Ergo, Again => => Go For It!
I'll take a look at these video series. I have been watching some on youtube already and I will add these to the lunch break selection.

I did a little bit of looking at boating related jobs this past year. I am studying mechanical engineering and have spent some time working on my car and on an oil rig this past summer. Maybe I could work as an engineer (engine room) assistant or something.
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