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Old 06-06-2006, 06:06   #1
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Engineering Jobs (Yacht)

Hi Gord,

I hope all is well,

I have the following yacht engineer positions that have just come in or are still available.

1. New Build 58m Motor yacht. 1.5 years from completion, needs a chief mechanical engineer and a chief electrical engineer to manage 8 engineers and 8 electrical engineers respectively. Accommodation currently in a 4 star resort. Salary between 8 and 10k usd per month and flights every 12 weeks. Opportunity to stay with the vessel once completed.

2. Large Motor Yacht, Electrical Engineer. 72000 usd per year, 3 on 1 off rotation start ASAP.

3. Large Motor Yacht, Class 2 or Y2 second engineer, 96000 usd per year, 3 on 1 off rotation start ASAP.

4. Project Manager, 43m Motor Yacht new build start ASAP, must have a good technical background and yachting experience.

5. 70m Motor yacht needs a helicopter pilot to fly a Eurocopter ec130 would like around 2000 flying hours.

6. Temp/short term, Chief Engineer, class 1 license, 6 months tour of duty. 70m Motor yacht. Start very short notice.

7. 164 foot new build, Y2 Chief Engineer start ASAP.

8. 2nd Engineer, Y3, start ASAP. 7500 usd per month full medical, possible rotation as chief after time to sit the Y2.

9. 55m Motor Yacht, Y2 Chief Engineer, start ASAP.

10. Chief Officer, large yacht experience (over 200foot), 9000usd per month with 6 weeks vacation.

11. Second Engineer, Y4 ticket, our main criteria are the IT computer side with engineering skills less essential, mainly in northern Pacific, PNG, INDO with our main base at either Cairns or Palau. Lots of Dive work with great possibilities for awesome Diving experiences. Start ASAP.

12. Chief Engineer, Y4, Private and Charter, 45m Feadship, currently in refit, 40 days of charter in the season, then a large refit later in the year. Start ASAP.

13. Relief 2nd Engineer, Y4 ticket, west coast of Mexico, for August and September or September/October.

14. 2nd Engineer, Y3 or Commercial Class 4, start ASAP, salary around 4500 .

15. Chief Engineer, Y3 or commercial 4 ticket, 60,000 usd, based Abu Dhabi, accommodation provided down town, home most nights. Transport to and from the vessel. Short runs out. 30 days leave and flights.

16. Temp engineer, for the month of September, based in London, trip to Amsterdam. Y4 ticket, 5000 usd.

17. Second engineer, 75 m Motor Yacht, Class 2 or Y1 ticket, 90000 usd 3 on 1 off rotation, Flight allowance.

18. Chief Engineer, 35m Motor Yacht, charter tips, Y4 ticket start asap.

19. Chief Engineer, Y4/Y3 40m Motor yacht. 5000 euros, start asap, med cruising.

20. Sole engineer/deck, crew of 4, 3500 euros a month. No ticket needed.

Kind regards,

Joe Hodgson,

Uk Mobile: 44 (0)771 363 5381.
Uk landline: 44 (0)20 7193 2204.
Skype: joewizz.

e: joe@wizzwazz.com

www. just4engineers.com
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Old 06-06-2006, 12:33   #2
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Yikes!! I can't believe the money they pay. I wish I had a ticket.
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Old 09-09-2008, 04:31   #3
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As a student pursuing an engineering degree, what undergraduate degree would a chief engineer likely have?

~Brett
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Old 09-09-2008, 06:36   #4
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Where do you get the ticket(s) from?
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Old 09-09-2008, 07:53   #5
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Goto:
Martin's Marine Engineering Training Page

Among others.
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Old 09-09-2008, 10:31   #6
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Follow the link and read MGN156(M) on the MCA's website - they tell you EXACTLY what you need for their engineering tickets. Most yachts are flagged under the red ensign, so getting a US ticket might limit your chances of finding a job.

Guidance & Regulations
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Old 10-09-2008, 17:48   #7
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So, I did nearly five years on a US Navy oiler, finishing up as an engineroom supervisor in a 600# steam plant, qualified on deck equipment and as a small boat engineer. Can I run a yacht?
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Old 10-09-2008, 18:14   #8
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I need to take that help wanted ad into my bosses office and show him what I am really worth.
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Old 10-09-2008, 20:43   #9
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Hello Gord:
My wife and I are degreed engineers in the US we have experience designing naval vessels, but all the links so far appear to be for non-degreed people. Do you have any other information that may be relevant? I would enjoy getting the sea time, but even if we spent the time on our boat, would standing watch on a 36 foot vessle count?
Thanks:
Decktapper
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Old 10-09-2008, 20:53   #10
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Goshea,
It sounds like you definately have the knowledge to be a yacht engineer; all the usual sytems are still there, plus you've got stuff like spa-baths and jetski's..! The biggest question though is whether you can live 24/7, year-in, year-out, in a confined environment, with the same people and still have a smile on your face for the guests...
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Old 11-09-2008, 03:05   #11
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I've been smiling like a fool since I got out of the Navy. I miss the sea time and the port calls and it turns out standing 6x6 watches was not that big a problem. I also liked the haircut, but hated the uniform. Most of the guys I worked with were the problem I had with the whole enterprise. The Navy sure can dredge'em up. As it gets further in my rearview, I don't feel as much as the pain and recall more of the good; I guess that's probably true about most things in life, otherwise why would a woman have more than one kid, right?

You guys ever read Sand Pebbles? Good movie, but great book. The way he writes about that engineroom makes it very poetic. Never worked on a reciprocating steam engine, but did run turbines. I think that book and my Navy experience is what made me pursue an English degree after I got out.
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Old 11-09-2008, 03:46   #12
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I’m neither a Professional, nor a practicing Engineer, so my knowledge of the details is sketchy. Those who grant licensure/certification would be the authoritative voice on the exact requirements that would apply to your specific situation.

You don’t indicate your exact status: Graduate BSc., EIT, or P.E.; which could make difference where you’d enter the program.

Notwithstanding, an Engineer is not a “tradesman”, and would require a certain amount of “practical” shipboard training (apprenticeship) to qualify as an operating (marine) engineer. Obviously, your education will form an excellent basis upon which to build a career.

Your time aboard your own 36 footer should count as “sea time”; but there may be some requirement to serve on larger horsepower engines (Engineers used to be H.P. rated).

Hope this helps, a little.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Decktapper
Hello Gord:
My wife and I are degreed engineers in the US we have experience designing naval vessels, but all the links so far appear to be for non-degreed people. Do you have any other information that may be relevant? I would enjoy getting the sea time, but even if we spent the time on our boat, would standing watch on a 36 foot vessel count?
Thanks:
Decktapper
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Old 11-09-2008, 07:41   #13
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I am a marine engineer qualified for both steam and diesel (unlimited horsepower) but my license has run out, as I haven't been working in a qualifying position for more than 3 years.

The system here is something like this: Or was when I did it.

3 years apprenticeship in a qualifying trade like machinist, fitter.

year school to qualify for the machinist exam and pass. Extra high level maths on the side normally needed.

1 year active sail time as a fitter/machinist

2 years at a marine engineering college.

If you already had 1 year sailing on the book, you are now qualified as a 3rd engineer.

Sailing time is logged as actual time in service, on the kind and size of machinery. i.e. steam or diesel. Horsepower was split between <2000, less than 5000 or over 5000, or something like that.

1 yr. active as 3rd to get 2nd

1 yr active as second to get 1st engineer

2yrs as 1st to get Chief Engineer, if you also have your electrical engineering endorsement.

I just checked what you need today.

Minimum high level (A-level) high scholl pass with major in Maths, chemistry and Physics also reqd as well as english.

3 years study (to BSc level)
1 year basic technical college (practical welding, turning, milling etc.)

6 months practical time at a relevant site/ship.

3 months as a "back-up" or extra 3rd engineer, before you get your license.

Then as above to work you way up.

For work on smaller boats like most mentioned above, you could get a temperary endorsement to chief if you have 1 yr. as 2nd on bigger vessels under certain limitations.

You have to pass a medical at least once a year.

The salaries mentioned are not that good if you have to pay taxes on them. I know a Chief Engineer here in Denmark makes about 80 kUSD/yr tax free and works equal parts on and off, either 2 or 3 months at most.

Might be easier elsewhere though.

Regards

Alan
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Old 11-09-2008, 20:42   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by decktapper View Post
Hello Gord:
My wife and I are degreed engineers in the US we have experience designing naval vessels, but all the links so far appear to be for non-degreed people. Do you have any other information that may be relevant? I would enjoy getting the sea time, but even if we spent the time on our boat, would standing watch on a 36 foot vessle count?
Thanks:
Decktapper
With seagoing jobs in the US, employers really don't care what college degree you have. Its your license that counts because its the law that you must have that license for the various positions aboard a vessel. This is also true with all other advanced maritime nations.

Being naval architects, it surprises me that you do not know this. Which naval vessels have you designed and for which firm?
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Old 14-09-2008, 20:55   #15
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Maybe I shouldn't have dropped out of Kings Point after all... When I was 20, the thought of working on some rich guy's yacht seemed horrific. What a difference a decade-plus makes.

Ah well.
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