Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 17-01-2011, 15:28   #16
Registered User
 
keyspc's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: hard aground in C.FL
Boat: 34' 1973 Grampian ketch
Posts: 294
id give my left nut for someone that could get an alternator on this damnn Vetus!!
No realy, im cash poor like many i meet that arent on gold-platers. But i can and do trade computer work and pay resonible cash for resonible rates when i got it.
__________________

__________________
keyspc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2011, 18:29   #17
Registered User
 
Hillbillyfunk's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: New Iberia, LA
Boat: 1967 Falmouth Gypsy 24'
Posts: 103
You guys have made your bias against mechanics quite clear but not answered the new users' question, perhaps you should consider that by acting like jerks you may put many new users off not only the cruising life style but also the cruisers forums.
__________________

__________________
Hillbillyfunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-01-2011, 19:34   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5
Wow! Thanks for all the input... I'm not a forum pounding person. In fact, this is one of my first posts. I get the impression that diesel techs, mechs, gearheads or however one is summond, are in the same club as police officers - Cuss them when they are behind you, but if one is needed at your door. "Where in the hell are they?" No, I do not need to make a living sailing and would be foolish to think I could. I'm just wondering if it's possible for someone to make a go of it along with bartering. If I post again I'll be more specific...
Cheers, and thanks for the kind words.
__________________
funcpl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2011, 14:55   #19
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tasmania
Boat: VandeStadt IOR 40' - Insatiable
Posts: 2,317
Images: 91
This might be a silly question, but:
What is the difference between a diesel technician and a diesel mechanic?
__________________
Weyalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2011, 15:32   #20
Registered User
 
Artif's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 261
Hi
My first post but had to comment on this thread.
I completed a 4 year marine engineering apprenticeship + 2 years at college.
On finishing my apprenticeship I went contracting and ended working on and building a variety of different mechanical projects, from nuclear power stations to Inmarsat 4 satellites (yes I was one of the techs that built them).
Marine techs/engineers are well respected throughout many industries because of their wide ranging skills and knowledge.

Everywhere that is except the marine trade.

Many owners of boats expect their grotty smelly lump of iron to fire up on demand and work faultlessly despite been sat idle for 11.5 months in a corrosive damp environment. Of course it was the last engineer to touch the engines fault that it doesn't work and nothing at all to do with the cheapest engine (volvo) the boatbuilder could find that would fit or the cheapest wiring that would meet the requirements.

Despite living on my trawler for several years on the Hamble, I kept the fact I was a Marine engineer very quiet, because most boat owners are a complete pain in the ass to work for.
I love working on boats but I am very very selective whom I will work for, the good owners are very few and far between.
__________________
Artif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-01-2011, 16:15   #21
Senior Cruiser
 
osirissail's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: A real life Zombie from FL
Boat: Gulfstar 53 - Osiris
Posts: 5,416
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artif View Post
. . . Despite living on my trawler for several years on the Hamble, I kept the fact I was a Marine engineer very quiet, because most boat owners are a complete pain in the ass to work for.
I love working on boats but I am very very selective whom I will work for, the good owners are very few and far between.
Very good summary. Unfortunately the diesel "techs" who will work for nothing and help out rarely know what they are doing anymore than you do. The diesel mechanics who know what they are doing stay quiet for the above quoted reasons.
- - However there is an exception when you really know and like the other cruiser and know he/she is kind and appreciative - then helping out is fun and might get you a good dinner or a bottle of wine. But you will be very unlikely to make any money at it - and you really don't want to make any money as that brings all kinds of "obligations" and implied warranties/guarantees about your work.
__________________
osirissail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-01-2011, 20:23   #22
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: West Indies
Boat: Burger 74' motor yacht, 65 foot 12 metre, Flicka and sailing dinghy
Posts: 635
I have this opinion as a pretty competent DIYer but one who would rather pay for someone to do it right the first time.
If I were you just draw the line at doing work for people for free or to help out. Few will appreciate it. If you do not value your time enough to give a written estimate before you start working, they will not value you.
Just let those people know you are more or less retired. Or that your wife will get upset if you take the time out of your "retirement" do do it.
If you want to be helpful just give them an idea of what to do. Diagnostic help for example. let them know you do not want to deprive them of the joy of doing their own work.
Once in a while you will find someone like me who values your work and has the money to pay you. work for them.
__________________
dohenyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-01-2011, 05:17   #23
Senior Cruiser
 
osirissail's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: A real life Zombie from FL
Boat: Gulfstar 53 - Osiris
Posts: 5,416
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by funcpl View Post
My wife and I are casting off in a couple of years. (We both can't wait) I'm a diesel technician and wondering if I could make somewhat of a living while crusing.
Cheers,
Not knowing where in the world the OP is from means a generic answer to the original question.
- - If you intend to remain in your home country while cruising then you have to deal with things like employment or self-employment taxes which comes in a variety of forms; then liability insurance especially if you are charging for your work; then local licensing requirements; and finally pressure from other local diesel techs who will not appreciate your "horning-in" on their turf.
- - If you intend to cruise the world - outside your home county or E.U. type thing; then you have some of the same considerations as above and added to that - work permits and local "payoffs" to politicians and other officials. Add to that the possible "direct remedies" from the locals whom you are taking money/business away from that they need to feed their families.
- - Those are the primary reasons, actual cruisers with "skills" - diesel or otherwise, do not charge for their work which is carefully labeled "assistance to the boat owner." Officially the boat owner is "doing the work" and you are advising and assisting without pay/compensation.
- - As is extensively discussed in other threads about working while cruising, you just cannot go anywhere and start collecting money/pay for work without dealing and satisfying the local regulations. Doing so can result in at best - being told to leave the country forthwith; and at worst being fined and/or jailed. Or worse yet - deported which will terminate your international travels for a very long time as few if any countries will allow you to enter when you have a "Deported" stamp in your passport.
__________________
osirissail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 08:59   #24
Registered User
 
SVHALLEL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ventura ca
Boat: 1988 Morgan Classic 41 "HALLEL"
Posts: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by funcpl
My wife and I are casting off in a couple of years. (We both can't wait) I'm a diesel technician and wondering if I could make somewhat of a living while crusing.
Cheers,
My trade is a diesel mechanic also. I tell people I do not do side work. My question is where are ya gonna put all the tools? They are very heavy and the tool ya need is always the one you did not bring. I usually just lend my fellow boaters a hand and then get some fellowship and a cold beverage. Most of the side work you will get is large power boats and they will take special tools (remember the ones you do not have). Sometimes you can trade professions and that works well for both parties. The next thing would be parts. And last off getting paid. I say forget about the job and enjoy your cruise. Happy sails,
__________________
SVHALLEL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 09:15   #25
Registered User
 
SVHALLEL's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ventura ca
Boat: 1988 Morgan Classic 41 "HALLEL"
Posts: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by osirissail

Very good summary. Unfortunately the diesel "techs" who will work for nothing and help out rarely know what they are doing anymore than you do. The diesel mechanics who know what they are doing stay quiet for the above quoted reasons.
- - However there is an exception when you really know and like the other cruiser and know he/she is kind and appreciative - then helping out is fun and might get you a good dinner or a bottle of wine. But you will be very unlikely to make any money at it - and you really don't want to make any money as that brings all kinds of "obligations" and implied warranties/guarantees about your work.
I agree with ya )
__________________
SVHALLEL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 09:23   #26
Senior Cruiser
 
osirissail's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: A real life Zombie from FL
Boat: Gulfstar 53 - Osiris
Posts: 5,416
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weyalan View Post
This might be a silly question, but:
What is the difference between a diesel technician and a diesel mechanic?
That's easy. A "Diesel Tech" is recently graduated from a school and thinks they know everything. A "Diesel Mechanic" is older than sin and has seen most everything that a diesel engine can do to malfunction and knows he has yet to see everything.
- - I give my money to the diesel mechanic as most of the "stubborn" problems with diesel engines defy logic and text book answers. The simple ones you can solve yourself - but the "weird ones" need a diesel mechanic who has been one for longer than you have been alive.
__________________
osirissail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 09:36   #27
Senior Cruiser
 
bstreep's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: San Antonio, TX/Port Aransas, TX
Boat: 1990 Macintosh 47, "Merlin"
Posts: 2,274
Wow. Sorry for the "welcome". Welcome to CF!

I think I can sum up the above opinions this way:

You MIGHT get a little work legally. You don't want to risk violating local laws by "working" without a permit. This comes up just about any time someone thinks about "working my way around the world".

HOWEVER, if you consider "alternate forms of payment", such as adult beverages, a meal or 2, gifts, or making great friends, you might be able to supplement your travels doing some repair work. Lots and lots of donations into the Karma Bank.
__________________
Bill Streep
San Antonio/Port Aransas, TX
bstreep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 09:52   #28
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artif View Post
Marine techs/engineers are well respected throughout many industries because of their wide ranging skills and knowledge.

Everywhere that is except the marine trade.

Many owners of boats expect their grotty smelly lump of iron to fire up on demand and work faultlessly despite been sat idle for 11.5 months in a corrosive damp environment. Of course it was the last engineer to touch the engines fault that it doesn't work and nothing at all to do with the cheapest engine (volvo) the boatbuilder could find that would fit or the cheapest wiring that would meet the requirements.

Despite living on my trawler for several years on the Hamble, I kept the fact I was a Marine engineer very quiet, because most boat owners are a complete pain in the ass to work for.
I love working on boats but I am very very selective whom I will work for, the good owners are very few and far between.
Welcome, Artif, I am also based on the Hamble -- although not for much longer if my number comes up at the much cheaper public marina in Southampton.

I think you might be being a little to hard on yachtsmen. Some of us, it is true, don't appreciate what it takes to keep our boats running and take out our frustration on the mechanics who attempt to do so. But most of us really do appreciate good mechanical work, I think, especially those of us who have done reasonably complex mechanical work ourselves, and who do at least some of our own work on our own engines.

You should also keep in mind that many of us have had legitimately bad experiences with diesel techs. I've had a few bad ones myself. The official Yanmar dealers were unable to find the cause of a smoking problem on my engine when I bought the boat a couple of years ago. At the vast expense of the seller, they took off and overhauled the injection pump, took off and overhauled the turbocharger, took off and ultrasonically cleaned the injectors, and all kinds of other things before I finally told them to stop and accepted the boat with the smoking uncured (to this day uncured by the way).

Then last fall I had power loss while crossing the Channel in a storm, and called in a tech in Weymouth where I ended up limping in. At considerable expense he pulled off this and that and pronounced a verdict that I had a cracked exhaust manifold, and proposed to pull that off and have it tested under pressure in a special pressurized oven, at vast expense, needless to say. I poked around myself and decided that perhaps the problem was actually caused by the engine being overfilled with oil (discussed and dismissed by the tech). I pumped some oil out and the engine has been as good as new ever since.

Of course no one is perfect.
__________________
Dockhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 10:06   #29
Registered User
 
JamuJoe's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Durango, CO
Boat: Leopard 42 - JAMU
Posts: 190
Images: 13
Diesel Skills - Any Shared Skills Enrich Cruisers

Wow - the OP took quite a bit of bashing for his simple note. I agree with the comments regarding work permits and the challenges of trying to operate a business in foreign countries (I've worked in several). I hate to see the discouragement on helping other cruisers with whatever skills you have, though, and either bartering for compensation or just 'paying it forward'.

I was stuck in Honduras with a cracked cylinder on one of my Yanmar 4JH3E's. This is not a place where you simply call for a qualified technician or mechanic. At the dock was a Kiwi cruiser who had been a diesel mechanic, and he graciously offered to help me. Sweating together, we rebuilt that engine in situ, ordering parts from Mac Boring and arranging innovative deliveries. The rebuilt engine was a success, I learned a good bit about my engines, and we became best friends. I reciprocated with beverages and meals, and helped him sail his boat down to Panama and through the canal.

Cruisers in remote places (not weekend sailors out of marinas in the USA) can be of great help to each other, and will find reward in doing so.

You may not be able to earn a cruising living as a mechanic, but your adventure will be enriched by meeting and helping other cruisers as you are able to do so.


OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by funcpl View Post
My wife and I are casting off in a couple of years. (We both can't wait) I'm a diesel technician and wondering if I could make somewhat of a living while crusing.
Cheers,
__________________
Safe Sailing,
JamuJoe - Durango, CO
S/V JAMU - Western Caribbean
JamuJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2011, 12:02   #30
Registered User
 
Allan S's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Lake Ontario, Canada
Boat: Seafarer 38 cutter rigged
Posts: 263
Images: 5
Send a message via MSN to Allan S
Welcome aboard, my apologies for the, ahem, abrasive responses. This forum is usually much better that that. Don't give up on us.
__________________

__________________
Our Coronado 25, Not named yet!
http://coronado25.blogspot.com/
http://sheppard1961.blogspot.ca/
Allan S is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
diesel

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SSB Tech in Florida captden Marine Electronics 3 12-11-2010 19:13
A Tech Diesel Question dpex General Sailing Forum 5 18-02-2010 07:14
Tech Info' GordMay Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 0 24-07-2007 04:39



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:54.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.