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Old 03-09-2005, 00:45   #31
Kai Nui
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BC Mike, you just illustrated my point.Most of us have skills that we COULD apply if we had to, but it would be far better to find something that is part of the enjoyment of cruising. (I bet that opens up a can of worms).
Sean, sounds like you and I are on the same track.
And one qualifier, I do realize there are a lot o people out there that gain great pleasure from turning wrenches, building cabinets, wiring electronics, etc. I have done these trades for enough years, that it just seems like work to me. My job currently would be considered white collar, but requires enough real experience in the blue collar industry to keep it interesting. Consulting of some sort is where my head is at. It is just a matter of finding an applicable niche.
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Old 11-09-2005, 02:37   #32
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An interesting article...

There is an interesting free article on conducting a business from a boat titled "Running a business from a voyaging boat" in Ocean Navigator Magazine(the online part).
A link to it is :-
http://www.oceannavigator.com/articl...sPage=8&a=7525
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Old 12-09-2005, 05:45   #33
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I notice a lot of posters on this BB who are apparently in the North America area and hope to cruise the Caribbean. If that´s you and you need to stop to earn more cruising chips, I´d recommend Georgetown, Grand Cayman. This first-world city needs workers both who are computer literate (something like 500 banks are represented on the island...) and who have boat skills (they average 3 new cruise ships/day and many of these tourists want to go on boat tours, feed the rays, visit North Sound, etc.).

Islanders who leave the Caymans have a very difficult time repatriating because the govt. has a strong social service safety net and can´t afford a large population of people who aren´t helping to feed that budget before they start drawing on it. Consequently, the labor supply is very limited. When we were there, they had 600 empty jobs and were running radio spots advertising for applicants. G´town runs periodic job fairs hoping to attract people who are willing to work and have the needed skills, and the govt. has mandated that full-time jobs must come with an employer/employee retirement matching benefit that, after 12 months, is totally portable (including the employer´s portion). Employers pay the fees for a work permit, and the work is inevitably legal. Wages are high by Caribbean standards, the cost of living is also high but, if living on a boat, there´s not much to spend money on, and the climate is sublime.

The downsides are the risk of staying over during a storm season (there are very protected estuary anchorages off North Sound but a direct hit will be a harsh reality), eventual island fever (so you fly out for a break), and the limits of an island infrastructure. Still, my impression is that this legal option is worth looking at for cruisers who are working their way across the Caribbean.

Jack
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Old 12-09-2005, 16:36   #34
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That is great info. The Caribbean is not the lion share of my cruising plans, but as most things, that could change.
Chris31415, great, article. very realistic.
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Old 11-12-2005, 11:59   #35
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there are ways but it depends on your talents

I run a small web based business that sells 12v and 24v computers we also are doing very well providing wifi and voice over IP products but whatever you do you must remember that it takes a very long time and an awful lot of commitment to make money while afloat I think the key is to have two or three different things on the go and any one time this way you are always able to keep a constant stream of work have a look at my site by all means www .NeptuneNet .net all the best PAUL
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Old 11-12-2005, 14:02   #36
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Thanks Paul. Great site. By the way, the Sierra Wireless 775 is out, and is capable of 1-2 Mbps, substantialy faster than the 750.
That is a very good idea for a boat based business, but I do not have suffient IT background for this myself. No less, I think it is a great option.
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Old 13-12-2005, 21:03   #37
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A good friend of mine ran a business from his boat while he sailed around the Med and Northern Europe for what turned out to be 4 years. He wrote some compression software called Zipget which compresses weather maps and forecasts and sends them via GPRS to mobile phones. It's here - some of you may even have used it. Anyway, Chris and I used to work together many years ago and my wife and I have followed their travels with interest, particularly as we are now about to embark on our own.

I find this thread and issue very interesting, as I *cannot* work in the US portion of our cruise after April 06 because of visa restrictions when my work here ends - not even flipping burgers apparently. I have always wondered how non-US people manage on extended cruising here because the work rules seem particularly strict. I'm hoping I may be able to do odd work either in Canada (I'm a citizen) and other parts of the Caribbean as we move around. Besides managing semiconductor design projects (unlikely to be a useful skill in the Caribbean) I can paint and I can play bass guitar but neither well enough to earn much money, I suspect

I think I'm in the Capt Lar stage - follow my nose for a while and just see what happens.

Cheers

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Old 13-12-2005, 21:50   #38
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Again, not my skillset, but it brings up a great point. A cruising boat is a great place for the success of a creative mind. I too, am curious how others do it. They can't all be software engineers. That's why I started this thread. I have erived some ideas for the thread, but have yet to find that life changing career path, but I am still hopeful.
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Old 14-12-2005, 07:42   #39
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An opinion...

This might not be right for everyone, but we have found the secret to financial life isn't in what you make, it's all in what you spend/waste.

A person could easily get by on painting or doing odd jobs around boat yards. There was a guy where I am now (he just left) from Australia. He was able to purchase a 40' boat, re-fit it, and have a big cruising kitty left over after he did odd jobs around the yard for cash.

How? He was frugal.
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Old 14-12-2005, 07:58   #40
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Sean is absolutely right - it’s not what you earn, it’s what you spend (or, more importantly, DON’T spend). Although I can be a profligate spendthrift when earnings are higher (Maggie is our “saver”), I’ve also been able to live “leaner”, on very meager earnings.
Frugality may be the cruiser’s most advantageous trait. Having had to ‘learn” the art myself, perhaps it might better be labeled a “skill”
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Old 14-12-2005, 07:59   #41
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It's an interesting conundrum - you mostly can't work in the places you visit for legal and immigration reasons (in spite of the fact you may have skills they need) but applying those skills instead to the cruising community (as a "market" in itself) means convincing a bunch of proudly independent, self sufficient and broadly not very wealthy people they need to pay for your services...hmmm

Speaking from a narrow western cultural persepective a big danger with the internet-driven ability to work anywhere is that the sorts of jobs you can do like that don't always end up moving onto the boat with you, they move to large software factories in India and China (and good luck to them) - being on the wrong side of such a shift might of course have prompted the move onto the boat in the first place... Perhaps if cruisers can live on 3rd world wages, though, they may still be able to compete. The key here is the creative aspect, as you pointed out - there should always be opportunities for creativity and originality.

I was talking to a guy on another forum who is a recording engineer, who spends 6 months in the studio on land each year doing the live work. The other half of the year he's a liveaboard and does mixing and final finishing using a laptop with Protools on his boat. Sounds good to me, just wish I was a recording engineer

There's little call for engineering managers at sea (as I am) so I'm simply viewing this as a mid-life-crisis break and trying to fund it on that basis. If opportunities come up where I can use any other skills I have and (legally) earn something for the kitty (assuming I've not been completely lobotomised by my years as a manager) then I'll view that as an upside. I guess I won't know until I get out there.

Cheers

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Old 14-12-2005, 09:33   #42
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[deleted... I wandered a bit from the subject... whoops!]
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Old 14-12-2005, 13:40   #43
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Quote:
You will likely need to re-adjust and be happy doing menial tasks with no honor, glory, or fame
And I thought that was what being a manager was all about

I don't have any problem with the adjustment and I have never managed people from a position of superiority. On the contrary, most of the people I've managed have been smarter than me in at least one respect or another, with no lack of opinions on the best way to do things

I've had the feeling for some time that this was not the direction I wanted to go in anyway, so this break will give me time to work out which way to go next. Certainly, I would prefer it to be something of my own choosing and creation, rather than part of a corporate body. I don't lack for interests outside work, although it remains to be seen if any of these can sustain an acceptable standard of living for my family.

And I suppose if, in the end, we all go sailing aren't we also moving our skilled labour overseas??!!

Cheers

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Old 14-12-2005, 21:43   #44
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I should probably put things in perspective here. When I started this thread, I had something in mind. Probably unrealistic, but I figured if I threw it out there, maybe something would come out of the woodwork.
What I am idealy searching for is something I can do WHILE traveling. Something that will generate a minimal income ($500-$1000 per month). Something that is not physical such as engine repair, or boat repair.
And most importantly, something that is fun.
In a perfect world. I would be able to take off, start this business (whatever it may be), and continue working as long as I wanted to cruise.
This may be a pipe dream, especially, since my expertise is also in management (discounting the skills that are physical in nature ).
One skillset I think might be able to be developed into such a business is public speaking. I am good at it, and I enjoy it. The problem is, what to talk about.
I have considered private investigation, and have the qualifications locally, but have not been able to obtain any information on obtaining work internationally.
There are a number of fields in wich I have done professional consulting, but, again, finding the market overseas has been out of reach so far. The limitation has been my lack of knowledge on international business practice.
Like I said, this may be a pipe dream, but if I don't ask, I will never know.
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Old 15-12-2005, 14:48   #45
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Sorry, Kai Nui. I neglected to read back into the thread when posting. I forgot what the original was about. Yes, we have thread wander going on here.
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