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Old 20-05-2015, 13:05   #91
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

Wow, I can't believe the number of replies! I just logged in this morning expecting a couple of posts, will take me a while to work through all the suggestions.

Thank you all for taking the time to give some feedback, I'll do some research and let you know what we choose.

Cheers

Shailey
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Old 20-05-2015, 19:59   #92
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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Duh, they ALL have 26 inch wheels. Including the two I bought. Which my wife and I absolutely hate. In fact she put hers aside after one month riding around Ft. Collins, and I bought her a different bike entirely. And I will be junking my new Montague in about two months. I'm going to try to get a trade in for the two of them at a bike shop.

I asked your height, which you seem nervous about, because one of our major complaints with the Montaque X-50s is that there is not enough adjustement in them for me. I bought a longer seat stem to get the seat higher to get my legs in a more comfortable riding extension. I bought a new riser to get the handlebars higher to match my new higher seat position. I bought a new stem with a longer extension so I didn't feel like I was being jammed up. Didn't work. The geometery of the bike is wrong. The components are of poor quality. The thing is made all of steel. It's NOT worth $800.

Perhaps you bought the $ 2500 model, and are a lot shorter than I am. You must be shorter. otherwise you wouldn't have the obvious complex about it. And maybe you're right. Montagues fit short people.
No it isn't. Every Montague bike, including the X50, is made from a 7005 alloy frame. There are a few steel bits and bolts.
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Old 21-05-2015, 00:43   #93
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

My Strida has been with me a few years now. I wouldnt give it up for anything. Gets me within 5-10 mile from my vessel. Off to the grocery store with a back pack. Good exercise, light and tiny. Most people never see it hanging in the aft cabin on my 35 ft. boat. Powder coated Alum., stainless disc brakes and Kevlar drive belt...NO GREASE!
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Old 21-05-2015, 14:38   #94
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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Originally Posted by Canibul View Post
Duh, they ALL have 26 inch wheels. Including the two I bought. Which my wife and I absolutely hate. In fact she put hers aside after one month riding around Ft. Collins, and I bought her a different bike entirely. And I will be junking my new Montague in about two months. I'm going to try to get a trade in for the two of them at a bike shop.

I asked your height, which you seem nervous about, because one of our major complaints with the Montaque X-50s is that there is not enough adjustement in them for me. I bought a longer seat stem to get the seat higher to get my legs in a more comfortable riding extension. I bought a new riser to get the handlebars higher to match my new higher seat position. I bought a new stem with a longer extension so I didn't feel like I was being jammed up. Didn't work. The geometery of the bike is wrong. The components are of poor quality. The thing is made all of steel. It's NOT worth $800.

Perhaps you bought the $ 2500 model, and are a lot shorter than I am. You must be shorter. otherwise you wouldn't have the obvious complex about it. And maybe you're right. Montagues fit short people.
I think we can all tell by Canibul's demeanor that he's pretty upset about his purchase. This brings up an important point about buying bikes in the days of the internet. You need to try out a bike before you buy it. Make sure it fits you & you fit it. Make sure you like the way it rides & handles & check out the quality first hand. Also, if it's a folding bike fold it, pick it up, try to visualize where you are going to stow it & remember you're going to have to get 1 or 2 of them in a dinghy. You can't do any of this over the internet. Don't end up like Canibul.
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Old 21-05-2015, 17:21   #95
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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You need to try out a bike before you buy it.
Very good advice. Particularly with folding bikes the fit for adults can be just awful. My nomination for worst folder is the di Blasi; it has the wheels too close together which makes it very painful to ride even short distances. It is very heavy as well. OTOH one of the reasons that the Brompton looks so strange is that the small 16" wheels are spaced about as far apart as a non-folding road bike - strange but very comfortable.

If you are looking for a high quality folder you will likely not find them discounted online so track them down at a local bike shop and try to ride one first.

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Old 21-05-2015, 17:39   #96
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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Take bikes but consider take-apart hubs on mountain bikes from goowill.
We had montagues early on. Taking them apart was a pain and then you have deal with all the bits. Uggh.

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Old 21-05-2015, 18:50   #97
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Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

My partner and I were just discussing this topic the other day, and I agree that it would be an absolute luxury to have bicycles not only for running errands but also for exploring. However the space they will take up, the hassle of loading on/off dinghy, and the short life span lead me to believe we will probably skip nice, fold up bikes. Perhaps if we venture somewhere and end up staying for a month we could purchase a $20 bicycle when we arrive, and when we leave sell it for $20 (this could be totally idyllic because we aren't out there yet). And I also agree about where/what type of sailing you'll be doing. Bikes may be pretty useless on remote sandy beaches, but could be handy in well paved small towns.
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Old 21-05-2015, 19:53   #98
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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So here are my questions - has anyone kept bikes on board and found them worth the space they take up? Do they rust quickly? Did you find you barely used them or preferred to hire a scooter?
Real world experience. We have 4 bikes on board that live on deck - 3 folders and a full-sized one. We had 5 bikes, but that was overkill for a family of 4. Actually the derailleur on my West Marine folder crapped out before we shoved off, so I brought along my full-size bike to use until it died and I had a chance to repair the WM bike. I pimped out the broken WM folder with a Shimano 8-speed internally geared hub. I can't say enough good things about this type of hub - it's awesome. Younger son outgrew his bike, so uses my folder, while I've kept the full-size Trek. We use our bikes a lot, and couldn't function without them. Here is what I've learned:

if you can keep your bikes inside, that would be great, but don't worry if they have to live outside;

internally-geared hubs rock;

with these you could use a belt-drive - I wish I had belt drive, and will convert my bikes when able to;

stainless or galvanized chains are better than regular. I know SS chains are only partly SS, but they definitely do better than standard steel chains ( we have all 3 types, so speaking from experience);

the best lube for chains is spray lithium grease - don't bother with WD-40, but keep some Liquid Wrench/PB Blaster on hand to loosen up rusted chains/bearings/cables/etc;

use a good waterproof grease on your cables (take them apart and lube the entire length) and bearings - I use Evinrude Triple Guard grease for outboards;

sealed bearings are awesome - bottom bracket, hubs and pedals. Still looking for sealed bearing folding pedals for the folders, I long ago converted all the bearings on the Trek to sealed and that's why it hasn't died yet;

rinse salt off soonest;

keep a bottle of rust converter (Ospho or somesuch) and plan to do regular touch-ups - even with all stainless and alloy componentry, there are a shocking number of bolts, nuts, screws, chain-rings, etc that will rust;

Rock Shox rot - I don't know what alloy they use, but I would avoid them or carry a wire brush and a can of touch-up paint. Can't speak about other brands of shocks, but I'd avoid the complication and extra weight - get a really good saddle, and quality handgrips instead;

if you can keep the bikes covered when outside (whether they ride inside or outside at sea) they'll last longer - we made our own sunbrella covers;

carry at least one spare tire, a couple spare tubes and some spare shifter and brake cables;

it should go without saying that you need a tube-patching kit and a pump;

rack and panniers are an absolutely necessity - not all folders can take a rack, so shop carefully. We have a trailer as well, but traffic conditions determine whether or not that can be used;

have front and rear lights - clip on led lights can be kept in the panniers just in case;

I wish I kept my Air Zound (figured I didn't need it since I wouldn't be commuting by bike any more), but I really only needed it in Nassau; and

the only bike worth taking is one you will actually ride - don't buy unless you've test-ridden it and are completely satisfied with the fit and are confident that the bike is solidly built.
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Old 21-05-2015, 22:21   #99
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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Other top 10 lists for folding bikes include the Strida LT. Here's a quote from one:

The Strida LT (MSRP: $650) is often mentioned as a competitor to Brompton folding bikes. The Strida LT gets high marks for style and design -- including a Best of Green award from TreeHugger.com. At 22 pounds, it's the lightest folding bike reviewed in this report. The Strida folding bike has a triangular frame, 16-inch wheels, a greaseless belt drive and a rear rack. Many reviewers mention the Strida's design, calling it "trendy" and "elegant." The Strida also folds up into an easy-to-carry package measuring 45 inches by 20 inches by 9 inches.
I mentioned the Strida a few posts before yours. I love mine but the post fell on deaf ear because i continue to hear the disadvantages of other folders that rust, hard to store and grease stains. this all goes away with a Strida.
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Old 22-05-2015, 03:18   #100
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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I mentioned the Strida a few posts before yours. I love mine but the post fell on deaf ear because i continue to hear the disadvantages of other folders that rust, hard to store and grease stains. this all goes away with a Strida.
The belt drive is brilliant -- how I'd love to dispense with the chain on mine.

But the single speed and little wheels would make the Strida unsuitable for my application.

So like others, I will have to continue to put up with the rusty, greasy, messy chain
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Old 22-05-2015, 03:31   #101
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

Don't really do the designer bit so we have to cheap and chearfull fold ups of the steel models. Cost about 90 dollors each and we load em up . They can carry up to 64l (with a mod or three) of diesel and this comes in very handy but it is a little hard on the tyres. If you keep them covered in lube there is not a rust problem. A must for global cruising IMHO
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Old 22-05-2015, 05:50   #102
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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I mentioned the Strida a few posts before yours. I love mine but the post fell on deaf ear because i continue to hear the disadvantages of other folders that rust, hard to store and grease stains. this all goes away with a Strida.
Actually I'm thinking about trying these out if I can find a dealer. When I got the Montagues I felt like getting a full size bike was a huge advantage, which I still believe, but the reality of stowing & transporting them in a dinghy makes them, although doable, inconvenient. The Strida looks like it may fold to a really manageable size. I think the bottom line is that everyone would carry folding bikes if they folded small enough, were light enough & were still functional.
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Old 22-05-2015, 07:24   #103
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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The belt drive is brilliant -- how I'd love to dispense with the chain on mine.

But the single speed and little wheels would make the Strida unsuitable for my application.

So like others, I will have to continue to put up with the rusty, greasy, messy chain
Having the size boat you do, makes sense. Makes you wonder why though, they do not use a belt and a single side swing-arm to accommodate it.

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Actually I'm thinking about trying these out if I can find a dealer. When I got the Montagues I felt like getting a full size bike was a huge advantage, which I still believe, but the reality of stowing & transporting them in a dinghy makes them, although doable, inconvenient. The Strida looks like it may fold to a really manageable size. I think the bottom line is that everyone would carry folding bikes if they folded small enough, were light enough & were still functional.
I bought mine used for $150 from a "folding bike collector". Almost no use. The tires and tube are high pressure which I found was a hassle to find even in large cities in Mx. So now I have a stash of tubes and tires.
I find myself shopping for this or that at least twice a week, where ever I am and to have a folder that is light enough to drop in a dinghy with on hand, takes up less room than almost all the others and never rust or grease makes it perfect for my application. It folds up in less than 20 seconds and stores vertically on a hook on the bulkhead in the aft cabin. I probably do 10-12mph on the thing which beats 2mph walking. The locals are curious about it and helps break the conversation ice when meeting people.
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Old 22-05-2015, 10:11   #104
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

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No it isn't. Every Montague bike, including the X50, is made from a 7005 alloy frame. There are a few steel bits and bolts.
You're right, and I stand corrected on the frame material. To be honest, with all the other low end components on this bike, I found it incredible that an aluminum allow bike STILL weighs 32 lbs.

And after buying and getting stuck with two of these, it's possible I am biased against them. I'm down to trying to swap the two of them to a bike shop for a bike that fits me.
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Old 22-05-2015, 10:36   #105
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Re: Taking fold-up bikes - yay or nay?

The Strada's ride position is ergonomically terrible. The low seat high, handlebar position ignores human physiology. It does not take advantage of big muscles in the back of the leg, butt and lower back. To best utilize those muscles and put the most effective force on the pedals, your back needs to be leaning at least slightly forward when pedaling. The way to get the best endurance and least muscle strain is to involve the largest range of muscles. An upright seating position does the opposite.

I see mostly women and those dumb beach cruiser bikes set up with a bolt upright riding position and think how stupid. For me, it's also the most uncomfortable way to ride any distance.
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