Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-12-2009, 19:39   #1
Registered User
 
Llamster's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 32
Sailboat Racing

A few questions for those of you who know about this stuff..

Not sure if this is the correct section but here it goes..

How does one get into this type of sport?
How do all these teams make money?
How much money do they make?
Is there prospect for big guys in the sport? 6'4" 270 (cutting to ideal 225-230)
If so, what position????
What are the different "positions"
Where should a person start if they are new?
Where is the best place to go (country-wise or state-wise in the U.S.) to get with the program, learn from the best?
What is the current best team out now?
Where can I find more information about this sport?

It seems that this is just kind of a sport that you never really hear about.. kind of like airplane racing or something to that extent.
__________________

__________________
"Never violate a woman, nor harm a child. Do not lie, cheat or steal.
These things are for lesser men.
Protect the weak against the evil strong.
And never allow thoughts of gain to lead you into the pursuit of evil.
Never back away from an enemy. Either fight or surrender.
It is not enough to say I will not be evil. Evil must be fought wherever it is found."

-The Iron Code of Druss-
Llamster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 20:02   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
The vast majority of sailboat racing is done by amateurs on the weekends. Probably only less than 0.1% is done by people who are paid professionals racing on ultralight multi-million dollar boats. Its one of those sports where once you reach a certain level, everyone knows each other meaning recommendations are by word of mouth

You start racing by going out with other amateurs who teach you the ropes. You start getting recognized as good by winning regattas. After earning a good reputation, you start getting asked to crew on larger and faster racing machines. Nobody really starts out at the top unless you are an owner who hires a professional crew or are an owners personal guest. Strength and size is not much of a requirement as is knowledge, skill and talent. Some boats in fact prefer smaller crew members depending on their class rules.
__________________

__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 20:24   #3
Registered User
 
paradix's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Australasia
Posts: 284
Most professional racers in this part of the world started out racing sailing dinghies as kids and progressed through the olympic class boats before hitting the big crewed boats. Many of them still go back and sail those small boats competitively to keep their skill levels up.

Having said that, on the bigger boats there are definitely positions for people with little sailing experience who nonetheless have the physical skills required for specific roles - openings for "big guys" here if you're especially fit and strong. Team New Zealand famously employed champion olympic rower Rob Waddell as a grinder in the Americas Cup campaign, based on his extraordinary strength and fitness and certainly not for his sailing experience.

It depends what your ultimate goal is. If you get on a big boat as a grinder or similar, you'll certainly learn a little bit about sailing from the experience. But it's extremely unlikely you'll get the chance to move further up the crew towards the skipper's role unless you prove yourself as a sailor in other forms of sailing. If your aim is just to get in amongst the hype and atmosphere though, then that might be the most direct route. I imagine that in the US, those positions are all filled by word of mouth as David suggests. But if you come down to NZ or Australia you'll find much more sailing going on per head of population, and the competition for positions might be less fierce. If you're genuinely committed, there are a lot of offshore races here where you can pick up a crewing position if you're fit, able and available. You won't get paid very much (if at all) but you'll get to meet a lot of people and get your foot in the door.
__________________
paradix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 22:01   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
Ex-Calif's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Singapore
Boat: Maxi 77 - Relax Lah!
Posts: 11,514
Images: 4
The predominant path to "professional racer" is through dinghy's as a kid, a team member in college, an olympian and then pro. As in all endeavors other ways are possible requiring tons of dedication. The world of paid sailors as in all sports is quite small.

We just had the World match racing tour in Malaysia. The tv coverage was awesome. Top prize money for the regatta was about $100k - split among the 5 sailors. Yacht racing is about sponsorship rather than prize money.

They asked the sailors what they would spend their "prize" money on. My top favorite answers -

- Some McDonalds hamburgers
- A haircut
- Pay my two month's back rent
- A tour card for 2010

These were the top professoinal sailors in their sport.

I reckon only about .000000001% of all sailors in the world make a living wage racing sailboats.
__________________
Relax Lah! is For Sale <--- Click
Click--> Custom CF Google Search or CF Rules
You're gonna need a bigger boat... - Martin Brody
Ex-Calif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 22:52   #5
Registered User
 
Llamster's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex-Calif View Post
The predominant path to "professional racer" is through dinghy's as a kid, a team member in college, an olympian and then pro. As in all endeavors other ways are possible requiring tons of dedication. The world of paid sailors as in all sports is quite small.

We just had the World match racing tour in Malaysia. The tv coverage was awesome. Top prize money for the regatta was about $100k - split among the 5 sailors. Yacht racing is about sponsorship rather than prize money.

They asked the sailors what they would spend their "prize" money on. My top favorite answers -

- Some McDonalds hamburgers
- A haircut
- Pay my two month's back rent
- A tour card for 2010

These were the top professoinal sailors in their sport.

I reckon only about .000000001% of all sailors in the world make a living wage racing sailboats.
I've come to the realization that life is way too short.... In all honesty, I wouldn't mind doing it for free (srs) as long as someone showed me the ropes and I was able to be the best I could possibly be. The challenge of striving to be the best and reaching your full potential (in anything for that matter) for me is the most exhilarating and satisfying feeling on earth.
__________________
"Never violate a woman, nor harm a child. Do not lie, cheat or steal.
These things are for lesser men.
Protect the weak against the evil strong.
And never allow thoughts of gain to lead you into the pursuit of evil.
Never back away from an enemy. Either fight or surrender.
It is not enough to say I will not be evil. Evil must be fought wherever it is found."

-The Iron Code of Druss-
Llamster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 23:23   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Kitsap Penninsula, WA
Boat: C&C Mega 30
Posts: 87
check the crew share websites, racing forums, and site for local yacht clubs sponsoring races.

If your in an area where there is racing, and all else fails, find out where most of the boats come to / from and hang out on the dock ready to go. Of course, chances are you'll get stuck on a loosing boat with an ahole skipper taking everything too seriously (and getting it all very arrogantly wrong) that no one else wants to sail with.

The best comment from someone that I heard was that he kept getting asked cause he showed up for EVERYTHING, no wind, pouring rain, freezing temperatures, he was there even if the owner decided he didn't want to go. For a lot of the guys that want to race there boats it's sometimes an issue just finding enough crew that knows the basics and will show up reliably. (this is in Seattle) Often enough, when it's not sunny and warm only the dedicated want to go.

Once you get started, assuming you get along well with others, you'll figure out more than I know.
__________________
wannago is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 04:01   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,313
Responses below in red.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Llamster View Post
A few questions for those of you who know about this stuff..

Not sure if this is the correct section but here it goes.. Not sure where you are located but get to a local sailing venue to get on a boat (yacht club, sailing club...)

How does one get into this type of sport? Go to where the racing is happening and introduce yourself, ask who might be looking for crew.
How do all these teams make money? Very, very, very few crews make money.
How much money do they make? Not much, I heard through the grapevine so don't know if it is true but a local sailmaker earns about $12k/year. Paid sailing positions are generally expenses.
Is there prospect for big guys in the sport? 6'4" 270 (cutting to ideal 225-230) Yes
If so, what position???? You start spinning winches and learn from there.
What are the different "positions" Grinders, foredeck, mastman, trimmers, navigators, tactitions, snacktitions , drivers, cooks.
Where should a person start if they are new?
Where is the best place to go (country-wise or state-wise in the U.S.) to get with the program, learn from the best? East Coast, Annapolis or Newport. Midwest, Great Lakes. West Coast, San Diego.
What is the current best team out now? How long is a string? Dinghy teams, big boat teams, amateur teams, pro teams....
Where can I find more information about this sport? Magazines, books, internet, local racing clubs, local regattas, national regattas, or my favorite,,,the Heiniken Regatta

Sailing and racing are great sports but it is extremely dificult to make a livng as a racing sailor. Good luck though.

It seems that this is just kind of a sport that you never really hear about.. kind of like airplane racing or something to that extent.
__________________
Joli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2009, 04:09   #8
Moderator Emeritus
 
Ex-Calif's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Singapore
Boat: Maxi 77 - Relax Lah!
Posts: 11,514
Images: 4
I forgot to add: Sailboat racing is an activity undertaken by very rich people so that very poor people can go sailing with them.
__________________

__________________
Relax Lah! is For Sale <--- Click
Click--> Custom CF Google Search or CF Rules
You're gonna need a bigger boat... - Martin Brody
Ex-Calif is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kevlar Racing Mainsail cburger Classifieds Archive 3 14-07-2008 16:26
I'm Going Racing Ex-Calif General Sailing Forum 17 10-01-2008 03:02
You Might Watch Yacht Racing, If . . . TaoJones Off Topic Forum 3 21-11-2007 22:17
Racing boats are getting delmarrey Monohull Sailboats 8 18-12-2006 19:39



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 15:19.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.