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Old 28-07-2012, 08:43   #1
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Planning an extended trip; where to start?

Hello,

Planning my first extended cruise and have a 3 week trip ahead of me. The voyage to my destination is 4days each way and I'd like to start getting things all set for those legs of the trip. I dont have enough experience to anchor out overnight so stoping at marinas is my only option. Moorings or slips get crowded because of the season.

All this to say; where to begin planning this?
Do I make reservations for each night? If i do, what happens with bad weather, the whole plan changes and then I'm out of a slip.
If no reservations what happens if everywhere is full?

Thanks!
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Old 28-07-2012, 08:59   #2
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Re: Planning an extended trip; where to start?

After the first night, you'll have enough experience to anchor out. It is much more fun. Put out lots of scope, conserve your electricity and water and go for it.
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Old 28-07-2012, 09:29   #3
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Thanks Hannah,
I have a 33 footer, what sort of anchor and chain length would you use? Or a combo of chain and rope?
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Old 28-07-2012, 10:24   #4
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Re: Planning an extended trip; where to start?

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Originally Posted by GreggL View Post
Thanks Hannah,
I have a 33 footer, what sort of anchor and chain length would you use? Or a combo of chain and rope?
The "scope" (total length of anchor "rode" including chain & rope) question is easy to answer -- the generally accepted rule of thumb is 7:1 (7 x the depth in which you are anchoring). Most cruising boats carry about 200' total rode. Note that boat length has no relevance to scope. Although the "displacement" (weight) of your vessel has bearing on the size and type of rode you select.

Re the type of anchor, and to a lesser degree the make up of your rode, that is likely to generate a maelstrom of responses....just stand by and watch the fun! (and/or, search forums on this topic).

Most cruising boats carry at least two different types of anchors because different designs of anchors work better in different bottom types.

So, the answer to the "which anchor" is going to depend somewhat on where you plan to anchor. Where do you plan to make this little cruise?
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Old 28-07-2012, 12:01   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor

The "scope" (total length of anchor "rode" including chain & rope) question is easy to answer -- the generally accepted rule of thumb is 7:1 (7 x the depth in which you are anchoring). Most cruising boats carry about 200' total rode. Note that boat length has no relevance to scope. Although the "displacement" (weight) of your vessel has bearing on the size and type of rode you select.

Re the type of anchor, and to a lesser degree the make up of your rode, that is likely to generate a maelstrom of responses....just stand by and watch the fun! (and/or, search forums on this topic).

Most cruising boats carry at least two different types of anchors because different designs of anchors work better in different bottom types.

So, the answer to the "which anchor" is going to depend somewhat on where you plan to anchor. Where do you plan to make this little cruise?
Thanks.
I'll be going across long island sound from nyc out to montauk. I currently have a 25lb plow anchor. Also a length of 300 foot rope plus about 10 feet of chain. Do you think that'll suffice for an overnight stop?
The anchor is rated for boats up to 35 feet and I'm at 33, but that makes me feel a little skeptical for some reason. should I upgrade to all chain or up the anchor size or both?
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Old 28-07-2012, 13:30   #6
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Re: Planning an extended trip; where to start?

Probably sufficient, but more chain would be better -- gives you more weight on the bottom and improves holding power. Also, my experience with plows is the heavier the better -- 25lb is near the low end of useful weight for a plow (IMHO).

I have not done much sailing on LIS (some, but not much), but in general the NE coast is pretty rocky. A plow is a good choice for rocky bottoms. Someone with more detailed local knowledge of your route can advice better than I. Have you chosen specific places you want to anchor? Nautical charts will often have abbreviations which indicate bottom types in specific areas on the chart so take a look at charts for your intended route (good idea to do anyway). For anchoring, you are mostly interested in good protection from wind and waves, good holding (type of bottom), and reasonable anchoring depth. In your area be sure an check the tides too because big tidal height variance needs to be accounted for when you anchor.

The ratings for length of boat are a bit bogus -- I think done to make purchasing simpler for retail customers with limited experience -- boat length (LOA) is largely irrelevant -- what really maters is weight and windage -- I think retailers just dumb this down to LOA (don't know how much actually analysis they put into these recommendations). I'm skeptical of these charts too, so I usually suggest that people use these charts to initially select an anchor and then go the next largest size.

All chain, appropriately sized chain, is good (except for all the added weight in your bow) and is more convenient when working with a windlass. Do you have a windlass? Many cruisers run all chain rodes because of the increased holding power, chafe resistance, and more convenient windlass use.

On my boat, a catamaran, I run what is called a "combination rode" (which is what you currently have) -- meaning some rope and some chain. In my case. I run over 60' of over sized chain backed up by about 200' of 3-strand nylon. Reduces weight forward (versus all chain) and gives me most of the advantages of all chain (esp given that I usually anchor in shallow water).
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Old 28-07-2012, 15:09   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor
Probably sufficient, but more chain would be better -- gives you more weight on the bottom and improves holding power. Also, my experience with plows is the heavier the better -- 25lb is near the low end of useful weight for a plow (IMHO).

I have not done much sailing on LIS (some, but not much), but in general the NE coast is pretty rocky. A plow is a good choice for rocky bottoms. Someone with more detailed local knowledge of your route can advice better than I. Have you chosen specific places you want to anchor? Nautical charts will often have abbreviations which indicate bottom types in specific areas on the chart so take a look at charts for your intended route (good idea to do anyway). For anchoring, you are mostly interested in good protection from wind and waves, good holding (type of bottom), and reasonable anchoring depth. In your area be sure an check the tides too because big tidal height variance needs to be accounted for when you anchor.

The ratings for length of boat are a bit bogus -- I think done to make purchasing simpler for retail customers with limited experience -- boat length (LOA) is largely irrelevant -- what really maters is weight and windage -- I think retailers just dumb this down to LOA (don't know how much actually analysis they put into these recommendations). I'm skeptical of these charts too, so I usually suggest that people use these charts to initially select an anchor and then go the next largest size.

All chain, appropriately sized chain, is good (except for all the added weight in your bow) and is more convenient when working with a windlass. Do you have a windlass? Many cruisers run all chain rodes because of the increased holding power, chafe resistance, and more convenient windlass use.

On my boat, a catamaran, I run what is called a "combination rode" (which is what you currently have) -- meaning some rope and some chain. In my case. I run over 60' of over sized chain backed up by about 200' of 3-strand nylon. Reduces weight forward (versus all chain) and gives me most of the advantages of all chain (esp given that I usually anchor in shallow water).
Thanks. Don't have a windlass so entirely all chain may be a lot to handle. I think I'm going to have to upgrade to a larger plow and certainly put a bit more chain on.
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Old 28-07-2012, 15:29   #8
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Re: Planning an extended trip; where to start?

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Originally Posted by GreggL View Post
Thanks. Don't have a windlass so entirely all chain may be a lot to handle. I think I'm going to have to upgrade to a larger plow and certainly put a bit more chain on.
An option to consider: keep the 25lb plow and also add a second anchor (something a bit beefier) then use the 25lb plow for what is called a "lunch hooK". For example, when you are just anchoring for a lunch stop and don't want to deal with the bigger anchor. Then use the bigger beast for overnight anchoring....you will sleep better.

Re hauling up the hook by hand: My primary anchor is 35kg (about 77lb) Bruce. I find that my practical limit for hauling that up by hand is about 30' of water...which means I am hauling up the Bruce + 30 feet of chain straight off the bottom. If you drop all chain in much deeper water than that then getting it back on board by hand is going to be a serious challenge.
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Old 28-07-2012, 15:31   #9
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Back to the topic at hand; if I were to want a slip or mooring for each night during the cruise out and back, what would be a good way to go about this? Referring to specifically inclement weather, delays and other issues that would cause a break in the chain of reservations every night.

Thoughts?
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Old 28-07-2012, 15:32   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor

An option to consider: keep the 25lb plow and also add a second anchor (something a bit beefier) then use the 25lb plow for what is called a "lunch hooK". For example, when you are just anchoring for a lunch stop and don't want to deal with the bigger anchor. Then use the bigger beast for overnight anchoring....you will sleep better.

Re hauling up the hook by hand: My primary anchor is 35kg (about 77lb) Bruce. I find that my practical limit for hauling that up by hand is about 30' of water...which means I am hauling up the Bruce + 30 feet of chain straight off the bottom. If you drop all chain in much deeper water than that then getting it back on board by hand is going to be a serious challenge.
Thanks! That's a good call.
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