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Old 17-08-2008, 10:43   #16
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when i was snorkeling at Grace Bay in the Turks & Caicos I saw one of these maybe 20 meters from shore along some coral and rocks. I was excited that I'd seen one, but now knowing this... It's a shame it's made it all the way out to the Turks.
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Old 17-08-2008, 11:46   #17
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Introduced non-native species are just a way of life now. I would imagine that it is too late to eradicate the lion fish. Fortunately this is not a specie that is going to displace another specie. Fortunately its venom is not deadly either. I saw some lion fish on a night dive in Moorea. They are actually quite beautiful fish and not aggressive at all. Since there is nothing that can be done, its probably best just to learn to appreciate them.

The San Francisco Bay is filled with non-native species. They are not necessarily good or bad, they just make things different.
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Old 17-08-2008, 21:56   #18
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I was feeling so clueless about the subject. Because of this thread, the article I stumbled acrossed yesterday jumped out at me.

Invader hits East Coast, Caribbean fish - World environment - MSNBC.com

This article, as well as others, does not depict it as "just different".

But nothing I am read here or there says anything about them being in the Sea of Cortez. Are they native to Mexico? Like I said, I was surprised to see one in the marina in La Paz. And I had no idea about the invasion on our east coast.
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Old 18-08-2008, 08:06   #19
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This sounds like pure paranoia. The same fish at risk from the slow moving lion fish are at risk from grouper, large triggers, eels, anglers, etc. Lion fish hunt with stealth. They sneak up on prey and gulp them. I've seen them corner shrimp and small fish in caves and gulp them as well. I highly doubt they could have a significant impact on any reef ecosystem.
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Old 24-09-2008, 06:29   #20
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Here's a cool video of some people catching, neutralizing the venom, cleaning, and eating the lionfish.
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Old 24-09-2008, 07:13   #21
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There is concern in my area as well, see the entire article here---
Virgin Islands, Virgin Islands Newspaper, A Pulitzer Prize Winning Newspaper, Virgin Islands Guide, Virgin Islands Info

V.I. National Park Chief of Resource Management Rafe Boulon is warning everyone using the ocean to look out for lionfish - a nasty predator that has the potential to seriously damage the territory's coral reefs.
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Old 24-09-2008, 11:49   #22
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Had an article in the local paper about them here in Palm Beach County just yesterday.
Scientists worried about more lionfish in the Atlantic
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Old 24-09-2008, 13:00   #23
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Quote:
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This sounds like pure paranoia. The same fish at risk from the slow moving lion fish are at risk from grouper, large triggers, eels, anglers, etc. Lion fish hunt with stealth. They sneak up on prey and gulp them. I've seen them corner shrimp and small fish in caves and gulp them as well. I highly doubt they could have a significant impact on any reef ecosystem.

I agree. It appears to be an overreaction to an evolutionary change predicated by human interaction. Now the solution is even more interaction by promoting a hunterís lust for wiping out a species as happened after Jaws.

They are not dangerous to humans and local fish will either adapt to recognizing the new danger or perish (Darwin).

Too much sensationalism by the media and a few hungry scientists looking for a sizeable grant.
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Old 24-09-2008, 16:26   #24
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I agree. It appears to be an overreaction to an evolutionary change predicated by human interaction. Now the solution is even more interaction by promoting a hunter’s lust for wiping out a species as happened after Jaws.

They are not dangerous to humans and local fish will either adapt to recognizing the new danger or perish (Darwin).

Too much sensationalism by the media and a few hungry scientists looking for a sizeable grant.
I wonder if you would feel the same way if it were happening in the waters you swim and dive in, or an invasive plant crowding out and killing the native trees where you live.

The alarming part is the rate that these things are popping up in our waters. 5 years ago they were unheard of. Today divers in the Bahamas are seeing them on almost every dive. The federal government is about to close down grouper fishing entirely in the southeast for the first four months of 2009. The Bahamas have closed fishing for Nassau grouper. The lion fish are just compounding the problem with our grouper and snapper fishery by loading up another competing predator onto the reef.

What eats lionfish in the Pacific? Apparently they have no natural predators over here.
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Old 24-09-2008, 20:38   #25
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A little off topic perhaps but I wonder if any other species, other than humans, in the great past have been responsible for the spread of a species from one geographic location to another geographic location?

Perhaps migratory birds carrying seeds in their digestive tracts?

So if both humans and other species are capable of doing this, then is there something inherently wrong with man doing it but nothing wrong with other species doing this? Opinions?
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Old 24-09-2008, 21:22   #26
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On the Chesapeake we have all kinds of invasive species.

Introduced by the greed of man.

Nutria....for fur....eat up the tidal marshes

Mute Swans..they are pretty...aggressive......play havoc with SAVs

Snakeheads......let loose by aquarium owners......no predators

People feeding ducks and geese......they never leave and spoil beaches...docks

Mitten crabs....destroying shoreline

Now they want to introduce Asian Oysters for the watermen who have effed up the clamming, crabbing and oystering by depleting everything.

Oh and let's include the hundred of thousands of pounds of chicken ca-ca- that Frank Perdue and his buddies allow to runoff into the Bay.
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Old 24-09-2008, 22:34   #27
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What eats lionfish in the Pacific? Apparently they have no natural predators over here.
Good question: I did some research and found out that Groupers, which eat lionfish in the Indo Pacific Ocean, have been heavily overfished in the tropical Western Atlantic Ocean. So they don't have any natural enemies left.

Perhaps a hatchery program and fishing moratorium for Groupers would be a better solution all round

PS. I have tasted lion fish before and it is a delicious white meat that takes on any flavor (like halibut)

But I don't know if they are high up on the ciguatera poison level.

Would be nice to know as they are easy to spear because they don't fear much and are slow
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Old 26-09-2008, 11:51   #28
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What eats lionfish in the Pacific? Apparently they have no natural predators over here.
They eat each other... large wrasse, groupers, Octopus, Wolf Eel. Probably others will start eating them in the Atlantic/Carib as well.
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Old 05-10-2008, 19:06   #29
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I see lionfish on every dive here (if I look for them). Yes, they have venom (and I hear it hurts like all get out) but I can't imagine them being a problem for humans, unless you go out of your way to mess with them. (Or stick your hand into a hole/under coral blindly, so hunters/gatherers beware.)

They tend to hang out under coral, and I imagine that spearing them would do more damage to the coral than the fish themselves.

Just my $0.02, (and I'm not a marine biologist or anything; I just dive a lot)
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Old 05-10-2008, 19:15   #30
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I just read an article in a local catamaran magazine here in Road Town BVI where they talked about Lionfish being a destructive invasive species...apparently studies show that young fish stocks declined 79% in the areas where lionfish had become established....they seem to be much more efficient predators than the local native fish....also mentioned was that DNA studies had shown that the whole of the west atlantic population had come from just 6 original fish....so probably from someone releasing unwanted fish from a home aquarium......
We saw lots of them in the Bahamas when we were there last april....almost every place we snorkelled.
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