Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-01-2008, 03:55   #1
Registered User
 
seafox's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: new zealand
Boat: Lotus 10.6
Posts: 1,270
Images: 26
Good reads

I always go to the library and grab a few books to read over the Summer on Seafox. I have even got Andy from Marauder into the habit of reading. (I know, those of you who know him will shake their heads and wonder how that gorilla could read!,You there Andy???, log in and fight back).

I have a few favourite authors such as John Grisham, Bryce Courtenay (His books are my favourites), Wilbur Smith, Lorenzo Carcaterra and Joseph Wambaugh.

I have read a few wobbly rubbish novels lately and wondered if there are any authors you can recommend?
__________________

__________________
"Very well, you hand it over and we'll put your town to our rudder and ne'er return" Captain Barbossa, Black Pearl, Pirates of the Caribbean.
seafox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 04:51   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
Anything by Donald E. Westlake (especially the “Dortmunder” novels*)
Donald Westlake ~ Book Excerpts
Bibliography: Donald Westlake ~ Bibliography

* JOHN DORTMUNDER is the savvy professional thief whose plans always, for some strange reason, go spectacularly and hilariously awry. The thing about Dortmunder is that he's a genius, a certifiable criminal mastermind. He's also the world's unluckiest crook - no matter how careful his schemes, no matter how brilliant and elaborate and intricately plotted, right down to the (almost) last detail, something always goes wrong. No wonder Dorrtmunder, already a two-time loser, is plagued by worry. And it doesn't help that his usual cohorts are more than a little eccentric, and not exactly the brightest Crayolas in the box.


Christopher Buckley (William F.’s son)
THANK YOU FOR SMOKING
Thank You For Smoking by Christopher Buckley Detailed Book Review

BOOMSDAY
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/22/bo...w/Stern.t.html
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 05:37   #3
Registered User
 
caribnsol's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Norfolk Va
Boat: Westerly Falcon 34
Posts: 148
James Clavell is one of my favorites (shogun, taipan, noble house etc) good enough to be re-read. For classics, really like Hemmingway. Tried to read War and Peace once (someone said it would be good for me) after 3/4 of the book was ready to gouge me eyes out with a spoon and threw it away.
__________________
caribnsol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 08:36   #4
Registered User
 
Triton318's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hayes, Virginia
Boat: 1962 28' Pearson Triton
Posts: 289
The Terror--A Fantastic Read

I just finished a most remarkable novel: The Terror by Dan Simmons (2007, Back Bay Books/Little, Brown and Company).

Wow...what a story. This is a historical novel, based on the 1845 Franklin Expedition to the arctic to search for the Northwest Passage (The Franklin Expedition).

If you're a history buff, and are particularly interested in 19th and early 20th century arctic and antarctic exploration, you'll really enjoy this book.

A review:

The Washington Post - David Masiel
[M]ixing historical adventure with gothic horror -- a sort of Patrick O'Brian meets Edgar Allan Poe against the backdrop of a J.M.W. Turner icescape. Meticulously researched and brilliantly imagined, The Terror won't satisfy historians or even Franklin buffs, but as a literary hybrid, the novel presents a dramatic and mythic argument for how and why Franklin and his men met their demise.

From the jacket:

The men on board HMS Terror have every expectation of triumph. As part of the 1845 Franklin Expedition, the first steam-powered vessels ever to search for the legendary Northwest Passage, they are as scientifically supported an enterprise as has ever set forth. As they enter a second summer in the Arctic Circle without a thaw, though, they are stranded in a nightmarish landscape of encroaching ice and darkness. Endlessly cold, with diminishing rations, 126 men fight to survive with poisonous food, a dwindling supply of coal, and ships buckling in the grip of crushing ice. But their real enemy is far more terrifying. There is something out there in the frigid darkness: an unseen predator stalking their ship, a monstrous terror constantly clawing to get in.

When the expedition’s leader, Sir John Franklin, meets a terrible death, Captain Francis Crozier takes command and leads his surviving crewmen on a last, desperate attempt to flee south across the ice. With them travels an Inuit woman who cannot speak and who may be the key to survival, or the harbinger of their deaths. But as another winter approaches, as scurvy and starvation grow more terrible, and as the terror on the ice stalks them southward, Crozier and his men begin to fear that there is no escape.

The Terror swells with the heart-stopping suspense and heroic adventure that have won Dan Simmons praise as “a writer who not only makes big promises but keeps them” (Seattle Post-Intelligencer). With a haunting and constantly surprising story based on actual historical events, The Terror is a novel that will chill you to your core.
__________________
Jay White
S/V Dove
1962 Pearson Triton, #318
Triton318 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 09:07   #5
Registered User
 
liberty16's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Connecticut, USA
Posts: 118
Images: 1
Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing
Moby Dick by Herman Melville

If you're up for a challenging and long read, try Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. It's alleged to be the most influential book for Americans today.
__________________
LIVE, LOVE, LEARN
liberty16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 10:55   #6
Registered User
 
mickmul's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Ireland
Boat: Van de Stadt 34'
Posts: 288
Images: 1
I reccommend "HMS Ulysses" by Alaistair McLean, a classic about the Russian convoys during the war . . .
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
mickmul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 11:40   #7
Registered User
 
caribnsol's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Norfolk Va
Boat: Westerly Falcon 34
Posts: 148
Atlas Shrugged is a good book (though not politcally correct) and if you like that try "the Fountainhead" also by Rand. They are making a movie out of Atlas, I hope they don't butcher it too bad.
__________________
caribnsol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 11:47   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NOVA/Quantico
Boat: none yet but looking
Posts: 47
Patricia Cornwell, james Patterson, Richard North Patterson, Larry Mcmurtry,

and Robert James Waller
__________________
jack7382 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 14:00   #9
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
George Orwell:-

1984
Animal Farm

Still damned good reads.

I tend to binge read pulp thrillers - not too fussy - But I love the "Jack Reacher" novels by Lee Child.
__________________
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 14:21   #10
Registered User
 
Jentine's Avatar

Join Date: May 2004
Location: Cruising on the hook
Boat: Beneteau 393, "Blackthorn"
Posts: 744
Images: 5
I like Clive Cussler, David Baldacci, Robert Ludlum, James Rollins and Steve Martini, to name a few. They all write adventure thrillers of some kind.
__________________
Jim

We are what we repeatedly do.
Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit."
--Aristotle
Jentine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 14:23   #11
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
If you haven't read any of the Harry Potter books I suggest you grab the first one and stick your nose in.
JK Rowling made a quantum leap in children’s literature with Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. The imagery she evokes from the written word is amazing and her word play is incredible.
Once you have read the first one theres no real need to read the series as you get the drift. Also there is understandable criticism at the darkness and some of the anti-religious themes, but I’m just talking about a joy of words.

Mark
__________________
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 17:51   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Colombo
Posts: 1,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by seafox View Post
I have read a few wobbly rubbish novels lately and wondered if there are any authors you can recommend?
I take it you might be after some cultcha for a change but even if not these two are very easy reads if you haven't come across them before:

"The Cruise of The Cachelot", Frank T Bullen. This is his narration of an actual American sailing type whaling ship voyage in 19th Century. It has "Moby Dick" beat by light years as a yarn - and just an embelished yarn I thought it was until towards the end when they get to southern NZ when it was all as I understood whaling to be down there back then. So I assume it is all factual with no polishing to amuse the readers.

"For the Term of His Natural Life", Marcus Clarke. Despite being an Australian novel is very good . About convict shipped to Tasmania and events in the convict settlement, etc. Quite a bit of 19 Century watery/boaty bits so not all on land stuff. There has been both a film and a TV series of the same name - they are not a patch on the book. I read it in the Sounds and was enough to keep me away from fishing and other troubles.

If you like old navy sailing ship type novels then the Hornblower books by C S Forester books are good stories if not read before.
__________________
MidLandOne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 18:23   #13
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidLandOne View Post
. Despite being an Australian novel is very good .

I'm affronted! Not that I read any Australian novels as they are all far too pretentiously written by hacks trying to appear educated, but our novels are amongst the best in the whole world, I'm sure! (Given that said pretentiousness, and the slight over emphasis on our treatment of Aboriginals - you'd think we were Spanish conquistadores!) Also sometimes we make the mistake of using 3 or 4 very long words where one short one would fit the bill, but thats just our propensity on grammatical correctness and trying to educate you lot on the other continents.
Finally we have had as many (percentage wise) alcoholic poets as you have had! Maybe we have more! There has never been a sober verse written in Australia - except by Banjo Patterson and who's he when he's at home? Our literature is writ on a sea of booze and high faluten phrases, and thus, its all better than wherever you're froms authors.

I rest my case.


__________________
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 18:58   #14
Moderator
 
Boracay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Pelican Bay, Great Sandy National Park
Boat: Steel Roberts Offshore 44
Posts: 5,175
Images: 18
Terry Pratchett's Discbooks...

I enjoy Terry Pratchett's Discworld books when I come across them.
__________________
Rust never sleeps
Boracay Blog.
Boracay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 19:36   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Deltaville, VA
Boat: 43 Beneteau
Posts: 18
pat Conroy

I think Pat Conroy is one of the great American writers of today...The great Santini, Lords of Discipline, Prince of Tides...all great books.
__________________

__________________
nancynana is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
August 22 - A Ripping Good Sail, or, Anybody NOAA good forecaster??? skipgundlach General Sailing Forum 0 22-08-2007 17:50
Good on em. Alan Wheeler Cruising News & Events 90 27-06-2007 18:44
Good bye "Sew Good" Wahoo Sails The Sailor's Confessional 6 06-12-2006 05:13
So far so good! finnosh Meets & Greets 0 02-03-2003 18:07
Good luck Anonymous Meets & Greets 1 24-02-2003 14:11



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:13.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.