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Old 18-02-2014, 12:40   #406
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

I g
I liked how he had to read the directions on the flare first. How the manual pump worked but he never used it again and how the life raft flipped over with all the counter weighted water bags.
Most good movies get an expert in the field they are using to get the dialog and terminology right use the right equipment and follow proper technique to make it as believable and as realistic as possible.
I always shave before a storm.

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Old 18-02-2014, 12:48   #407
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

"I always shave before a storm."

Forgot about that one, I could not stop laughing when we saw that, like what the f*** is he doing?

On a serious note, make sure you have your life vest on (I don't think I saw one in the entire movie but could be wrong) and make sure you clip you tether on to the life lines, that's a good policy.
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Old 18-02-2014, 13:03   #408
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

It was just a movie! Otherwise he would have popped a Viagra and been better able to deal with his boat problems when they happened.
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Old 18-02-2014, 13:10   #409
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

I wasn't a training film guys.
Anyone would think ever sailor is clever & skilled.
He wouldn't be the first idiot I have met in a boat.
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Old 18-02-2014, 13:36   #410
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

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Originally Posted by irwin37 View Post
"I always shave before a storm."

Forgot about that one, I could not stop laughing when we saw that, like what the F*** is he doing?

On a serious note, make sure you have your life vest on (I don't think I saw one in the entire movie but could be wrong) and make sure you clip you tether on to the life lines, that's a good policy.
Did you watch the whole movie?
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Old 18-02-2014, 17:40   #411
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

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Originally Posted by irwin37 View Post
..

I will stop now.... but I could keep going.....
Thanks for stopping. All those things have been mentioned numerous times over the last 27 pages of comments.
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Old 18-02-2014, 18:35   #412
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

Technical sailing issues aside, I have to agree, Redford is the SLOWEST, CALMEST idiot who ever lived. There is a time to move REALLY quick, and, I submit, a keelboat rapidly filling with water from a gaping hole in mid-ocean is, was, and will always be, one of those times. In such circumstances, I submit, the priorities lie as follows:
#1 Stop or reduce the amount of water coming in.
#2 begin removing the water which is already on the wrong side of the hull.
#3 Do it really fast. No, REALLY fast.
Having said this, I did actually enjoy the movie. Maybe Mythbusters can so a show on sailing myths.
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Old 18-02-2014, 19:22   #413
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

Good movie. Funny comments. Some people take things way too seriously.
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Old 18-02-2014, 22:43   #414
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

A perfect movie or not we all owe the creators and Robert Redford for making us male sailors exotic stock in the eyes of many women again. Although I'm committed I have had more women when I've gone out say "so are you like that guy in the movie All is Lost, Robert Redford is so hot"

I can't believe anyone would complain about this movie. It's not like we have a plethora of sailing movies to choose from. I would say it's definitely made the top 5 just by being made. It would have been in the top 5 even if they made Steve'o from Jackass the leading man based previous sailing movies.
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Old 18-02-2014, 23:10   #415
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

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Originally Posted by Cpt Pat View Post
All is Lost captures the challenges and process of surviving the unexpected at sea -- alone. Those who have never ventured far out to sea alone on a sailboat may not recognize the acceptance of uncontrollable fate or the quality of calm and carefully calculated action the film portrayed (essential survival skills that racing may never teach you).
Maybe you've gone further than me but I've singlehanded a bit and thought the movie was ridiculous. The guy gets a hole in the boat the size of a suitcase and never bothers to jam a cushion against it? He's standing there for ten seconds looking at his laptop while water is flowing in.

My wife and I watched it together and kept laughing at his terrible luck and string of atrocious decisions.

Starting a fire in your a life raft? Not stopping water as it pours into your boat? Going offshore without a BIG manual bilge pump? Not having a handheld VHF?

Thankfully it's just a fictional character. Up there with Pop Eye and Peter Pan.
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Old 19-02-2014, 02:42   #416
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

I think Mr Redford is past his use-by date regards acting..or maybe the script was silly. or maybe both.
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Old 19-02-2014, 02:45   #417
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

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I think Mr Redford is past his use-by date regards acting..or maybe the script was silly. or maybe both.
I think you need to ignore the bad sailing aspects completely, it's a film about a man who made a load of mistakes. Once you do that, I think (personally) the acting and cinematography were fantastic.
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Old 19-02-2014, 03:00   #418
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

I've done a lot of solo sailing myself,. And while your thoughts and observations are absolutely valid and smart they are slightly unfounded.

What about a ditch bag? why did he fall asleep with his life raft tied to the sinking boat? Cushion to plug a hole.?

I've never sank a boat far offshore but I once was on a boat that sank 10 miles outside the Beaufort NC inlet and we could not tack weld a steel plate to the above the water line hole because every time a wave hit it blew the 3-1/4in steel sheet back into the engine room. I was a trained underwater welder and long time saturation diver at the time so experiance was on my side and I still could not beat the sea with many hands helping me.

I did not think once to put my survival suit on in winter because I was on a sinking boat and at that was my job at the time. Forget food, water or anything. A million things are going through your mind because you know you're dead somewhere deep down. We all ended up surviving out of luck. One of the guys jumped into the life raft jump feet first and went straight through the bottom of her. And all I could think was oh **** we are sinking with dead fish on the boat.

Calling for help on a sinking boat is about the last thing that occurs in your mind because mostly your in disbelief it's happing. And calling for help feels like you're giving up and signing your own death certificate because givin the right conditions you know you won't be found. I remember yelling grab the EPIRB more than 20 times and we landed in the raft without it.

He represents IMHO the majority of people in that situation. Look at the Captain of the Bounty for example and the testimonies, It was not the first Hurricane he took that boat through and look at the amount of poor decisions he made and probably made in all storms before where they came out lucky.

I like how they directed the Movie. The woulda, shoulda, coulda is the same way people would evaluate you're situation if god forbid you ever had to face that.

While I never had to abandon ship 100's of miles at sea I can tell you after doing it no matter what training you have and ideas you have it's way different in real life. When I was in sat school I had to complete a helicopter crash escape course and two of my classmates that took the course with me died in a actual at sea helo ditching at a low altitude which is exactly what we were trained for.

The mind is a funny thing and you don't know what you'll do until you actually face that situation. Everyday I sail I still roll over that memory of woulda shoulda coulda in my past and I know in the end we were all just lucky. That's how it all happens most of the time when you're in a rescue situation.

I even used to picture how I'd get in a lift basket in heavy seas and was trained to do it. Every time a roller with a white cape hit me I was another 60 yards away. Opps I forgot to duck dive because I was actually struggling for my life this time. I was a former Navy Salvage and EOD diver. I've had actually been plucked by basket several times in my career.

I good friend that was a former Navy SEAL told me once 4 SEALs died parachuting into heavy seas off of Grenada which is a situation they train for on a regular basis.

My point is you don't know what you'll do when in the real deal. His mistakes actually made the movie believable.
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Old 19-02-2014, 13:34   #419
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

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...My point is you don't know what you'll do when in the real deal.
There's an awful lot of truth in that.

Many years ago I was out sailing on a < 20' dingy with a friend. She had spent easily several hundred hours in this boat. One afternoon we capsized. She completely lost it. There were four of us on the boat, and the person who had ten times the experience of the rest of us combined was not only no help, but a definite impediment to getting the boat righted. She got her wits about her eventually, but if you put those first few minutes in the water on film, anyone watching would say an experienced sailor wouldn't react that way.

People do weird, completely illogical stuff under stress.
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Old 19-02-2014, 14:23   #420
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Re: ALL IS LOST: The Movie

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Originally Posted by satdiver View Post
I've done a lot of solo sailing myself,. And while your thoughts and observations are absolutely valid and smart they are slightly unfounded.

What about a ditch bag? why did he fall asleep with his life raft tied to the sinking boat? Cushion to plug a hole.?

I've never sank a boat far offshore but I once was on a boat that sank 10 miles outside the Beaufort NC inlet and we could not tack weld a steel plate to the above the water line hole because every time a wave hit it blew the 3-1/4in steel sheet back into the engine room. I was a trained underwater welder and long time saturation diver at the time so experiance was on my side and I still could not beat the sea with many hands helping me.

I did not think once to put my survival suit on in winter because I was on a sinking boat and at that was my job at the time. Forget food, water or anything. A million things are going through your mind because you know you're dead somewhere deep down. We all ended up surviving out of luck. One of the guys jumped into the life raft jump feet first and went straight through the bottom of her. And all I could think was oh **** we are sinking with dead fish on the boat.

Calling for help on a sinking boat is about the last thing that occurs in your mind because mostly your in disbelief it's happing. And calling for help feels like you're giving up and signing your own death certificate because givin the right conditions you know you won't be found. I remember yelling grab the EPIRB more than 20 times and we landed in the raft without it.

He represents IMHO the majority of people in that situation. Look at the Captain of the Bounty for example and the testimonies, It was not the first Hurricane he took that boat through and look at the amount of poor decisions he made and probably made in all storms before where they came out lucky.

I like how they directed the Movie. The woulda, shoulda, coulda is the same way people would evaluate you're situation if god forbid you ever had to face that.

While I never had to abandon ship 100's of miles at sea I can tell you after doing it no matter what training you have and ideas you have it's way different in real life. When I was in sat school I had to complete a helicopter crash escape course and two of my classmates that took the course with me died in a actual at sea helo ditching at a low altitude which is exactly what we were trained for.

The mind is a funny thing and you don't know what you'll do until you actually face that situation. Everyday I sail I still roll over that memory of woulda shoulda coulda in my past and I know in the end we were all just lucky. That's how it all happens most of the time when you're in a rescue situation.

I even used to picture how I'd get in a lift basket in heavy seas and was trained to do it. Every time a roller with a white cape hit me I was another 60 yards away. Opps I forgot to duck dive because I was actually struggling for my life this time. I was a former Navy Salvage and EOD diver. I've had actually been plucked by basket several times in my career.

I good friend that was a former Navy SEAL told me once 4 SEALs died parachuting into heavy seas off of Grenada which is a situation they train for on a regular basis.

My point is you don't know what you'll do when in the real deal. His mistakes actually made the movie believable.
You've earned my vote for the best post in this thread.

Thank you.
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