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Old 11-11-2011, 09:52   #31
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

While the U.K. requires no license, they do require that someone aboard holds a SRC (short-range certificate) if there is a VHF aboard. The Germans take it one step further, they now enforce that the skipper must hold a SRC if there is a VHF aboard.
Germany - one needs to get a "SBF-See" license which has a tough written but a ludicrously easily practical exam. All subsequent licenses for non-commercial use are purely at the boater's discretion.
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Old 18-11-2011, 19:32   #32
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

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Originally Posted by Hydra View Post
In France:
* No qualifications are required by law before recreational boaters being permitted to sail offshore. A license is required for motor boats. There are rumors of creating a license for sailing boats but it doesn't seem serious.

* No checking out or nav plan are required.

Alain
This confuses me. I read frequently about French sailors on websites discussing getting permits for coastwise (permis cotier) and bluewater (permis hauturier). There is even one for rivers (permis fluvial) Is this just a title or affadavit that enables people to charter? They also talk a lot on French websites about certain boats being restricted to sailing within x miles of a harbor. The posters wonder if they're allowed to sail between port A and port B if they're too far apart. Other boats are permitted to venture further out, and a third class is allowed to go to sea. This three-tier system seems to be based on size, equipment carried, and an inspection or submission to the Affaires Maritimes bureau. Doesn't sound unfettered to me.
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Old 19-11-2011, 02:48   #33
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

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This confuses me. I read frequently about French sailors on websites discussing getting permits for coastwise (permis cotier) and bluewater (permis hauturier). There is even one for rivers (permis fluvial) Is this just a title or affadavit that enables people to charter? They also talk a lot on French websites about certain boats being restricted to sailing within x miles of a harbor. The posters wonder if they're allowed to sail between port A and port B if they're too far apart. Other boats are permitted to venture further out, and a third class is allowed to go to sea. This three-tier system seems to be based on size, equipment carried, and an inspection or submission to the Affaires Maritimes bureau. Doesn't sound unfettered to me.
Permits are needed for power boats only (if french flag): the coastwise allows you to sail within 6 miles from a sheltered area, the bluewater is a "no limit" permit. That's for recreational crafts.
If you're doing commercial chartering, it's a bit different: you need a professional certification (capitaine 200, or 500,... or more, which are STWC 95 certifications) and the ship has to be authorized by the Merchant Navy.
Recreational sailing ships don't need any permit...

On rivers, all ships (sailed or powered) need a "fluvial" permit, but, for short trips, sailing boats may get a temporary license (for instance to cruise from Atlantic to Med, by Canal du Midi). Sea going permits are valid on rivers.

As for your question "certain boats being restricted to sailing within x miles of a harbor" it's a different problem. Formerly, french recreational boats were divided into 6 classes according to their length, bulding strurdiness...:
1 st: no limit
2 nd: 200 miles within a shelter
3rd: 60 miles within a shelter
4 th: 20 miles
5 th: 5 miles
6th: inshore (2 miles)
It was a legal obligation: a skipper sailing further these limits may be prosecuted.

Nowadays it's an european regulation: boats are classified in A, B, C, D, ... building classes, according to their ability in supporting wind and waves
For instance A means the ship can support wind stronger than 8 Beaufort and waves higher than 4 meters, D means wind less than 4 Beaufort and waves less than 0.50 meters.
But the only legal obligation for a skipper is to choose the safety equipement; coastal (whithin 6 miles of a sheltered area) or bluewater: you could cross the Atlantic Ocean on a D class boat as longer you've got the bluewater safety gears, it's not illegal, it's the skipper's liability.
Of course, in case of accident you'll have to deal with your insurance company, which could blame you for not respecting european classification...

Pupuce (yachtmaster instructor)
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Old 19-11-2011, 03:57   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psk125

This confuses me. I read frequently about French sailors on websites discussing getting permits for coastwise (permis cotier) and bluewater (permis hauturier). There is even one for rivers (permis fluvial) Is this just a title or affadavit that enables people to charter? They also talk a lot on French websites about certain boats being restricted to sailing within x miles of a harbor. The posters wonder if they're allowed to sail between port A and port B if they're too far apart. Other boats are permitted to venture further out, and a third class is allowed to go to sea. This three-tier system seems to be based on size, equipment carried, and an inspection or submission to the Affaires Maritimes bureau. Doesn't sound unfettered to me.
The main restrictions is the safety equipment you have to carry outside that there's isnt any impediment.

Dave
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Old 19-11-2011, 04:20   #35
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

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Originally Posted by Zanshin View Post
While the U.K. requires no license, they do require that someone aboard holds a SRC (short-range certificate) if there is a VHF aboard.
Not quite true, in the UK you need licence to operate a VHF, not own it. The individual also needs to have passed the short range course which is a one day of training.

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Old 19-11-2011, 19:04   #36
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

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Not quite true, in the UK you need licence to operate a VHF, not own it. The individual also needs to have passed the short range course which is a one day of training.

Pete
Well, you do need a ships station license to install it in a vessel as well as an operators license to use it.

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Old 24-07-2013, 04:40   #37
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

Australia, Western Australia:
Anyone over the age of 14 can get a Skippers Ticket.
You only need a Skippers Ticket on a power boat over 6hp.
Perth Boat School is the main place in Western Australia and each state has their own boat schools with different laws in each. You can get your Skippers Ticket 7 days a week at any boat ramp, on demand. You can study online, but need to do it all face to face. It consists of a theory part, as well as Practical part - the same as a car licence.
You also only need to pay once in WA, your Skippers Ticket lasts for life and you don't need to pay ever again.

Mike
(yes I am from Perth Boat School, but you asked the questions, so I am answering - not really pushing an advert) If anyone has commercial questions regarding Commercial or Recreational certificates feel free to ask me via email - you can see the address on our website. I dont want to do commercial stuff on this great forum.
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Old 24-07-2013, 05:39   #38
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

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Originally Posted by Pete7 View Post
Not quite true, in the UK you need licence to operate a VHF, not own it. The individual also needs to have passed the short range course which is a one day of training.

Pete
You are correct, the German laws specify that if a VHF is aboard then someone must have at least a SRC. And as of last year, they've refined that rule to state that the skipper of the vessel must hold a SRC certificate or more if there's a VHF aboard (either built-in or even hand-held). In the UK you just need a SRC or more to use a VHF and of course a built-in radio must have a station license from OFCOM.
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Old 24-07-2013, 06:05   #39
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

Belgium is probably (one of) the best of the real EU countries to register your boat. Registration is simple, and providing you keep your boat elsewhere there are no restrictions or requirements that I am aware of.
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Old 24-07-2013, 06:50   #40
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Re: Skipper's Qualifications

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In the United States, "Skipper" is a nickname holding no real authority with the government. It means, usually, the person who owns the boat and is by default, the one in charge.

We also use the word "captain" that loosely, but it also has a legal definition meaning certain coursework and levels of experience. To operate a personal watercraft the owner is not required to have any kind of license except at lest in one state (Florida, the only one I'm fammiliar with), if one is under 21, in which case one must have taken a state safety course. I took it anyway (trust me, I'm over 21!) but it was extremely basic and there was no "holding the tiller" or "behind the wheel" test.

Commerically it'a a whole other story and others can explain it better than me.
The USCG uses the term "Master" as the licensed person who is in charge of a vessel. Generally speaking, "captain" is a licensed person in charge and "skipper" is a licensed or unlicensed person in charge. These terms get confused all the time but it is easy to see how this can happen.

The owner isn't necessarily the person in command and almost never is with larger commercial vessels.
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