Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-08-2015, 07:58   #1
Senior Cruiser
 
Roy M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Southwestern Yacht Club, San Diego, CA
Boat: Searunner 40 trimaran, WILDERNESS
Posts: 3,041
Images: 4
Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

MEXICO CHECKING BOAT USERS FOR PROPER PAPERS

BY SANDRA DIBBLE of San Diego Union Tribune July 2015

Crackdown includes passports, permits for fishing, and visiting

Without a fence to mark the international boundary, crossing by boat from San Diego into Mexico might seem deceptively easy. But San Diego sport fishermen and others drawn to the waters off Baja California's coast should take heed: Mexico's federal government has been stepping up inspections, checking for passports, tourist permits, fishing permits and other documents.

Until now, violators have been issued warnings, and told to turn around. But this week, the Mexican government announced its intention of cracking down on violators. That could mean boats being towed to Ensenada for an administrative process, and immediate deportation of the crew and passengers. While violators won't face charges, "it will be an inconvenience," said Remedios Gómez Arnau, head of the Mexican Consulate in San Diego.

The warning is being issued through Mexican consulates across California, and as far as western Canada and Arizona, and states that the "Mexican Navy and immigration authorities are strengthening their presence in Mexican waters."

According to Mexico's federal government, some 40,000 to 50,000 tourist vessels cross into Mexico each year, many for fishing, but others for other activities such as racing or cruising.

While fishing permits long have been required, the federal government has more recently been asking foreign visitors to comply with Mexican immigration regulations, requiring them to carry passports and tourist permits when inside the country's territorial waters, within 12 miles of the coastline. Known as an FMM, the visitor permit costs about $21.

In recent years, the requirements have been cause for confusion. "I think the core of the issue in many cases is that people are willing to follow the rules; they're just not sure what they are," said Ken Francke, president of the Sportfishing Association of California, which represents 170 marine recreational businesses.

Mexico has been working with members of the San Diego boating community to clarify the rules. In March, the country's federal government launched a website and app that includes links and instructions in English and Spanish for obtaining fishing permits and visitors permits.

Sharon Cloward, president of the San Diego Port Tenants Association, said she worries that some may not yet have received word of Mexico's plans to pursue immigration violators. "The bottom line is that nobody's ever enforced it, so this is all so new, that's my biggest concern," she said. "We want to make sure we're getting the information out to everybody."

Francke offered praise for the consulate's efforts: "The Mexican government is really doing outreach to the American public to make them feel comfortable to visit their country," he said. "You need enforcement to make sure everybody is in compliance. That's no different from the CHP monitoring speed on the freeway."

For more information, go the association's website, at: californiasportfishing.org, or to the Mexican government site, sportfishinginmexico.com. Remedios Gómez Arnau, Mexico's consul general in San Diego, is helpful, too.
__________________

__________________
Roy M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 08:05   #2
Registered User
 
Tallswede's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Baytown Tx
Boat: Hunter 23.5, AMF Sunbird & 36' Prairie Trawler
Posts: 101
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Hmm, wonder if we are doing the same?
__________________

__________________
Tallswede is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 08:15   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,848
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallswede View Post
Hmm, wonder if we are doing the same?
Yea that is a joke
__________________
motion30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 08:30   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Boat: Shopping
Posts: 426
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallswede View Post
Hmm, wonder if we are doing the same?
The US deports about 400,000 people each year.
__________________
Cottontop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 14:23   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
roverhi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kona, Hawaii, Carlsbad, CA
Boat: 1969 Pearson 35 #108 & 1976 Sabre 28
Posts: 6,003
Send a message via Yahoo to roverhi
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

So there's only a few million who get to stay.
__________________
Peter O.
'Ae'a Pearson 35
roverhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 17:40   #6
Registered User
 
TacomaSailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Burnt Store Marina, SW Florida
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,148
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

We live aboard in San Diego. We, and many of our friends, sail out to the Coronado Islands which are in Mexican waters - about 45-miles NNW of Ensenada and 14-miles South of Pt Loma and only 6-miles south of the border. The US/Mexico border is only 3.8 NM due south of the Sea Buoy for the entrance to the San Diego Bay channel. It is very easy to wander across the border when sailing in the prevailing NNW winds.

We and they sightsee, race, and occasionally fish. The big problem is that the required Mexican licenses and permits are not clearly defined nor easy to obtain:

- VHF license at least one person on board must be a "captain" with a VHF license. There is no such license assigned to a person in the US - the license belongs to the boat. Mexico does not issue such a license.

- SSB license - same problem as VHF

- HAM radio license if there is one on board.

- Tourist permit - can only be obtained by personally visiting the consulate in downtown San Diego where there is no parking. I go there on my bicycle but I only live a few miles away. The last time I went to Ensenada to pickup a boat to bring back to San Diego the customs/immigracion office in Tijuana would not issue the visa (permit) because it is NOT required in Baja California Norte (south to Guerro Negro) or, some other officials tell me it is not necessary north of the south side of Ensenada. Anyway, I could not get the Visa / Tourist permit required by the Navy.

If you can have one issued - it costs $22 which must be paid at a Mexican Bank, although sometimes the Tijuana border office will let me pay them.

UPDATE - I just checked the Mexican Visa Office web site and it states two strange facts:
1 - When in Baja California a visa is not required north of Maneadero which is a suburb EAST of the center of Ensenada. So - if you take your boat to Marina Coral in north Ensenada you do not need a visa while on land but if you walk two miles south to the downtown marinas you do need a visa. But, while on the boat at sea north of Marina Coral you do need a visa. How is one to know these things?

2- Visas are no longer issued by a consulate. It must be obtained at an appropriate office in Mexico. How does a boater with guests for the day or weekend obtain the necessary visa to sail into Mexican water? The closest border crossing is at San Ysidro and you can park (for $10) and walk across the border in just seconds. You might be able to get a visa but then you will stand in line for hours to re-enter the US.

- Fishing License - this is the real killer issue. If there is one pole, hook, line, tackle box, lure, spear gun, Hawaiian Sling, or anything else that might be used for fishing - then every single person on the boat needs a license, and the dinghy needs a license, and the boat needs a license.

The cheapest license is $25.80 PER PERSON and is good for a week. A license can be obtained thru the mail or in person in Mexico.

That means no spur of the moment trips out into Mexican waters if there is any fishing gear on the boat , unless you can verify each person on your boat has a license.

And, several friends have had trouble with Mexican Naval officials who would not accept the fishing licenses received by mail because they were not on the same form issued when visiting an office in person.

I have nothing against Mexico enforcing reasonable license and permit requirements. I just wish it were possible to know what is really required and how to get it.
__________________
TacomaSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 17:52   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2014
Boat: Shopping
Posts: 426
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
We live aboard in San Diego. We, and many of our friends, sail out to the Coronado Islands which are in Mexican waters - about 45-miles NNW of Ensenada and 14-miles South of Pt Loma and only 6-miles south of the border.

We and they sightsee, race, and occasionally fish. The big problem is that the required Mexican licenses and permits are not clearly defined nor easy to obtain:

- VHF license at least one person on board must be a "captain" with a VHF license. There is no such license assigned to a person in the US - the license belongs to the boat. Mexico does not issue such a license.

- SSB license - same problem as VHF

- HAM radio license if there is one on board.

- Tourist permit - can only be obtained by personally visiting the consulate in downtown San Diego where there is no parking. I go there on my bicycle but I only live a few miles away. The last time I went to Ensenada to pickup a boat to bring back to San Diego the customs/immigracion office in Tijuana would not issue the visa (permit) because it is NOT required in Baja California Norte (south to Guerro Negro) or, some other officials tell me it is not necessary north of the south side of Ensenada. Anyway, I could not get the Visa / Tourist permit required by the Navy.

If you can have one issued - it costs $20 which must be paid at a Mexican Bank, although sometimes the Tijuana border office will let me pay them.

- Fishing License - this is the real killer issue. If there is one pole, hook, line, tackle box, lure, spear gun, Hawaiian Sling, or anything else that might be used for fishing - then every single person on the boat needs a license, and the dinghy needs a license, and the boat needs a license.

The cheapest license is $25.80 PER PERSON and is good for a week. A license can be obtained thru the mail or in person in Mexico.

That means no spur of the moment trips out into Mexican waters if there is any fishing gear on the boat , unless you can verify each person on your boat has a license.

And, several friends have had trouble with Mexican Naval officials who would not accept the fishing licenses received by mail because they were not on the same form issued when visiting an office in person.

I have nothing against Mexico enforcing reasonable license and permit requirements. I just wish it were possible to know what is really required and how to get it.
I see, as it's a PITA and expensive to enter legally, you just enter illegally. I guess you don't have much to say about illegal immigration into the US.
__________________
Cottontop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 18:27   #8
Registered User
 
autumnbreeze27's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Cruising Mexico
Boat: 50' Herreshoff Ketch
Posts: 967
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
We live aboard in San Diego. We, and many of our friends, sail out to the Coronado Islands which are in Mexican waters - about 45-miles NNW of Ensenada and 14-miles South of Pt Loma and only 6-miles south of the border. The US/Mexico border is only 3.8 NM due south of the Sea Buoy for the entrance to the San Diego Bay channel. It is very easy to wander across the border when sailing in the prevailing NNW winds.

We and they sightsee, race, and occasionally fish. The big problem is that the required Mexican licenses and permits are not clearly defined nor easy to obtain:

- VHF license at least one person on board must be a "captain" with a VHF license. There is no such license assigned to a person in the US - the license belongs to the boat. Mexico does not issue such a license.

- SSB license - same problem as VHF

- HAM radio license if there is one on board.

- Tourist permit - can only be obtained by personally visiting the consulate in downtown San Diego where there is no parking. I go there on my bicycle but I only live a few miles away. The last time I went to Ensenada to pickup a boat to bring back to San Diego the customs/immigracion office in Tijuana would not issue the visa (permit) because it is NOT required in Baja California Norte (south to Guerro Negro) or, some other officials tell me it is not necessary north of the south side of Ensenada. Anyway, I could not get the Visa / Tourist permit required by the Navy.

If you can have one issued - it costs $22 which must be paid at a Mexican Bank, although sometimes the Tijuana border office will let me pay them.

UPDATE - I just checked the Mexican Visa Office web site and it states two strange facts:
1 - When in Baja California a visa is not required north of Maneadero which is a suburb EAST of the center of Ensenada. So - if you take your boat to Marina Coral in north Ensenada you do not need a visa while on land but if you walk two miles south to the downtown marinas you do need a visa. But, while on the boat at sea north of Marina Coral you do need a visa. How is one to know these things?

2- Visas are no longer issued by a consulate. It must be obtained at an appropriate office in Mexico. How does a boater with guests for the day or weekend obtain the necessary visa to sail into Mexican water? The closest border crossing is at San Ysidro and you can park (for $10) and walk across the border in just seconds. You might be able to get a visa but then you will stand in line for hours to re-enter the US.

- Fishing License - this is the real killer issue. If there is one pole, hook, line, tackle box, lure, spear gun, Hawaiian Sling, or anything else that might be used for fishing - then every single person on the boat needs a license, and the dinghy needs a license, and the boat needs a license.

The cheapest license is $25.80 PER PERSON and is good for a week. A license can be obtained thru the mail or in person in Mexico.

That means no spur of the moment trips out into Mexican waters if there is any fishing gear on the boat , unless you can verify each person on your boat has a license.

And, several friends have had trouble with Mexican Naval officials who would not accept the fishing licenses received by mail because they were not on the same form issued when visiting an office in person.

I have nothing against Mexico enforcing reasonable license and permit requirements. I just wish it were possible to know what is really required and how to get it.
Lots of misinformation here. The Lat 38 Baja Haha first timers guide to mexico has most of the information you're looking for. They got rid of the silly boat fishing license a while ago.

I understand your frustration as somebody living on the border and not wanting to deal with the red tape, so you can always vote with your wallet and stay out of mexico, but dodging their rules will just bring you grief.
__________________
autumnbreeze27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 19:10   #9
Registered User
 
micah719's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Somewhere in Germany
Boat: OEM, proportional
Posts: 1,436
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

2004:



2013:



Mexican Government?
__________________
Ps 139:9-10 If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; Even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me.
micah719 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 19:18   #10
Registered User
 
Dulcesuenos's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Florida Keys, Bahamas Bound
Boat: 38' French Cat
Posts: 2,828
Images: 4
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

One more reason not to go. Stupid is as stupid does

Sent from my LG-LS980 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________
Dulcesuenos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 21:57   #11
Registered User
 
TacomaSailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Burnt Store Marina, SW Florida
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,148
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Quote:
Originally Posted by autumnbreeze27 View Post
Lots of misinformation here. The Lat 38 Baja Haha first timers guide to mexico has most of the information you're looking for. They got rid of the silly boat fishing license a while ago.


There is a great deal of very poor information being proffered here and it is not mine!

Quoting the OFFICIAL Mexican License site:
"When operating a vessel in Mexican waters with fishing gear on board, it is necessary to hold a valid fishing license for everybody aboard regardless of age and whether fishing or not. (A Fishing License is not required when fishing from land)."

Here is the SAGARPA web site - check it out yourself:
» Regulations

and another from a sportfishing charter site:
"Shore Fishing Does NOT Require a Mexican Fishing License[

You do NOT need to purchase a Mexican fishing license if you are only going to be fishing from the shore while in Mexico. This includes surf fishing from the beach, fishing from the rocks, or fishing from a pier.

Unlike the US state of California where you need a fishing license for any type of ocean fishing, Mexico does not require a fishing license while fishing from shore. The gentleman at the CONAPESCA (Mexico's National Aquaculture and Fishing Commission) explained to me that this rule applies to both Mexican citizens and tourists. Because many Mexican families depend on shore fishing to feed their families, Mexico allows shore fishing for free.

Mexican Fishing Licenses ARE Required When Fishing from Any Type of Boat or Flotation Device

A flotation device includes all types of motorized boats, but also includes non-powered flotation devices such as sea kayaks, surfboards, or even an air mattress. In a conversation with the CONAPESCA office, I specifically asked about fishing from my surfboard, and they confirmed that technically, this required a fishing license.

All Passengers, Regardless of Age, Are Required to Carry a Fishing License While On Board a Boat Involved in Fishing

Even if some passengers are not actually fishing, they are are still required to have a fishing license!

Technically, even if nobody on board the boat is fishing, but there is a fishing pole, fishing tackle, or any type of fishing equipment on the boat, every single passenger should have a valid fishing license with them. That is the rule."[/B]

check out the web site:Mexican Fishing License - CONAPESCA Office in San Diego
__________________
TacomaSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2015, 22:05   #12
Registered User
 
TacomaSailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Burnt Store Marina, SW Florida
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,148
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cottontop View Post
I see, as it's a PITA and expensive to enter legally, you just enter illegally. I guess you don't have much to say about illegal immigration into the US.


What ? I guess you missed the point I was making! How does one determine what is necessary to be legal?

Immigracion is the official Mexican agency which issues tourist visas. They tell me a visa is NOT necessary to bring my boat to Ensenada and will not issue the visa (been there-done that). The Port Captain in Ensenada tells me the same thing - get the VISA in Ensenada if we are headed south of Punta Banda. BUT, the Mexican Navy says they will seize my boat if I do not possess the visa that the visa agency will not issue. ??? What does one do?

VHF License - there is no such thing so how would I obtain it? How do I earn a legal VHF license issued to a person?

Fishing License - we get one issued by mail but the Navy says it is not the correct form. How do we deal with that problem?

I was trying to make the point that it is very difficult to determine what is really required.

PS - when we cruise in Mexico we do have all the required Visas, fishing permits, and and HAM licenses - done it many times with no problems.
__________________
TacomaSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2015, 08:39   #13
Registered User
 
Don1500's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: On Board, just above the water
Boat: Marine Trader 47
Posts: 1,176
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Just remember, this is Mexico we are talking about, all fines are payable on the spot. Or you can go through the legal motions until you pay them elsewhere.
__________________
The Nomad Blog Mother, mother ocean, I have heard you call
Everything I know about cruising I learned from Travis McGee - http://theroamingnomad.com
Don1500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2015, 08:56   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 104
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

The Mexican Navy...Bwahahahaha
__________________
SniperSailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2015, 08:58   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Montréal, Canada
Boat: pelle&Peterson, Maxi95, 9,5 mètres
Posts: 31
Send a message via Skype™ to Va2shp
Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
We live aboard in San Diego. We, and many of our friends, sail out to the Coronado Islands which are in Mexican waters - about 45-miles NNW of Ensenada and 14-miles South of Pt Loma and only 6-miles south of the border. The US/Mexico border is only 3.8 NM due south of the Sea Buoy for the entrance to the San Diego Bay channel. It is very easy to wander across the border when sailing in the prevailing NNW winds.

We and they sightsee, race, and occasionally fish. The big problem is that the required Mexican licenses and permits are not clearly defined nor easy to obtain:

- VHF license at least one person on board must be a "captain" with a VHF license. There is no such license assigned to a person in the US - the license belongs to the boat. Mexico does not issue such a license.

- SSB license - same problem as VHF

- HAM radio license if there is one on board.

- Tourist permit - can only be obtained by personally visiting the consulate in downtown San Diego where there is no parking. I go there on my bicycle but I only live a few miles away. The last time I went to Ensenada to pickup a boat to bring back to San Diego the customs/immigracion office in Tijuana would not issue the visa (permit) because it is NOT required in Baja California Norte (south to Guerro Negro) or, some other officials tell me it is not necessary north of the south side of Ensenada. Anyway, I could not get the Visa / Tourist permit required by the Navy.

If you can have one issued - it costs $22 which must be paid at a Mexican Bank, although sometimes the Tijuana border office will let me pay them.

UPDATE - I just checked the Mexican Visa Office web site and it states two strange facts:
1 - When in Baja California a visa is not required north of Maneadero which is a suburb EAST of the center of Ensenada. So - if you take your boat to Marina Coral in north Ensenada you do not need a visa while on land but if you walk two miles south to the downtown marinas you do need a visa. But, while on the boat at sea north of Marina Coral you do need a visa. How is one to know these things?

2- Visas are no longer issued by a consulate. It must be obtained at an appropriate office in Mexico. How does a boater with guests for the day or weekend obtain the necessary visa to sail into Mexican water? The closest border crossing is at San Ysidro and you can park (for $10) and walk across the border in just seconds. You might be able to get a visa but then you will stand in line for hours to re-enter the US.

- Fishing License - this is the real killer issue. If there is one pole, hook, line, tackle box, lure, spear gun, Hawaiian Sling, or anything else that might be used for fishing - then every single person on the boat needs a license, and the dinghy needs a license, and the boat needs a license.

The cheapest license is $25.80 PER PERSON and is good for a week. A license can be obtained thru the mail or in person in Mexico.

That means no spur of the moment trips out into Mexican waters if there is any fishing gear on the boat , unless you can verify each person on your boat has a license.

And, several friends have had trouble with Mexican Naval officials who would not accept the fishing licenses received by mail because they were not on the same form issued when visiting an office in person.

I have nothing against Mexico enforcing reasonable license and permit requirements. I just wish it were possible to know what is really required and how to get it.
Many informations mention above is wrong, someone should do his home work.
__________________

__________________
Va2shp is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
Mexico, rule

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Php Enforcing 40% Tax on Overstaying Yachts? Gone2long Rules of the Road, Regulations & Red Tape 2 07-08-2013 16:27
Entry Reg's n Rules boatman61 Rules of the Road, Regulations & Red Tape 96 31-03-2012 02:49
Its Not How Much Someone Costs, Its What You Bring to the Table. s/v Beth Our Community 27 28-02-2012 10:50
Xcalak - Port of Entry for Mexico Bugged Atlantic & the Caribbean 19 04-05-2010 05:41



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 14:06.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.