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Old 17-08-2015, 20:33   #61
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
I just could not accept the fact that so many things have changed in the way Mexico manages it's territorial waters.
It would not be the first time that someone decides he/she will not accept the way things have changed in the way some foreign sovereign country manages itself. At least you do not propose to overthrow a government or kill a president, I guess the world has changed.

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Nor could I understand how they wanted to make it darn near impossible to daysail into Mexican waters.
Look around the world and you will see that most countries (including the US) will make it impossible for foreign boats to sail into their waters without going straight to a Port of Entry. In fact a good example is the US. IME the most notable exception is Europe, as long as everyone onboard is European.
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Old 18-08-2015, 09:00   #62
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

For those who might be interested, my yacht club will be publishing a pretty cool checklist with costs, addresses, and other resources, this coming Friday. I will forward the URL to this thread. Every year, for the past 52 years, we have sponsored the Little Ensenada Race. The new legal requirements made it necessary to put together this guide so that all of our racers could enjoy the race without hassles. The Mexican government has been helping directly to ensure the accuracy of the information. They want the racers to have a good time also. This information will be of help for those participating in the Baja Ha Ha. It's a new day, with new challenges, as well as some new threats. Roll with it or avoid it, but don't think you can resist it.
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Old 18-08-2015, 09:07   #63
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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And why would we fish with guests on board when the cheapest license they can buy is $25.80 per person?
Even if you and your guests don't fish, everyone (except kids? and Mexican citizens) needs a license if you have any rods, reels or fishing tackle on board -- even if it is stowed. Theoretically, a single fishing hook triggers the requirement. But, it is their country, they make the rules and we should respect them if we want to use their waters. And vice versa.
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Old 18-08-2015, 09:11   #64
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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Originally Posted by svlamorocha View Post
Look around the world and you will see that most countries (including the US) will make it impossible for foreign boats to sail into their waters without going straight to a Port of Entry. In fact a good example is the US. IME the most notable exception is Europe, as long as everyone onboard is European.
The thing is, going straight to a port of entry may no longer be sufficient in Mexico.
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Old 18-08-2015, 09:35   #65
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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The thing is, going straight to a port of entry may no longer be sufficient in Mexico.
Mexico has a problem that it has a bunch of islands off the coast just south of the US/Mexican border which are very popular fishing grounds for US fishermen. They often do not go south to Ensenada which is pretty far out of the way. They skip across, fish and come home all without ever touching land. And of course, as one poster put it, in the past "all for free".

Trying to corral that behavior is not a trivial task. How does one prove that you weren't going to fish if you have a pole on board? How do you prove who was going to fish with that one pole (if only one).

And if you are down there "for the day" on a boat, what else would you be doing? There is after all a whole ocean north of the border if you just want to go sailing.

Personally I tend to agree that $25 / person is a bit spendy for fishing licenses, but how do you prove that they were only going to be there a day? I think the "license" should be something you could print and carry in your wallet and only purchase once per year. As long as you have that license, you are good to go. If you don't, then don't be on a boat with a fishing rod.

I also think that this whole permit system is in its infancy and will shake out over time.
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Old 20-08-2015, 08:47   #66
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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Mexico has a problem that it has a bunch of islands off the coast just south of the US/Mexican border which are very popular fishing grounds for US fishermen. They often do not go south to Ensenada which is pretty far out of the way. They skip across, fish and come home all without ever touching land. And of course, as one poster put it, in the past "all for free".

Trying to corral that behavior is not a trivial task.
Why not require fishing licenses for all aboard any boat with fishing gear. That is their current requirement, and easily enforced. All the paperwork beyond that really accomplishes nothing but does deter lots of potential visitors. Coral Marina, in Ensenada, used to be so popular that reservations were required. Between the perceived violence, impounding of vessels (for months) for seemingly trivial and certainly unintentional paperwork discrepancies, fishing laws that no prohibit the take of any bluefin (in the best bluefin season in decades), and now the difficulty of even understanding, let alone complying with, what seem to be constantly changing requirements, boat based tourism to Ensenada has thinned considerably. It's their country and they can do what they want, but I think they are shooting themselves in the foot.
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Old 20-08-2015, 10:48   #67
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Mexican entry requirements are changing everywhere!

Mexico now requires non-Mexican tourists walking across the border at San Ysidro (Tijuana) to present a passport and purchase a $21 tourist permit if they plan to stay more than a week. This is a huge change in the long standing policy that encouraged tourists to come to the NW Baja communities to spend money and have fun.

And just to make it easy for those southbound tourists - the Mexican national immigration website still says that no tourist permit is required if staying in the area from Tijuana to south Ensenada.

The Mexican government has been listening to Donald Trump. Here is a quote from:

"This is about putting our house in order," said Rodulfo Figueroa, Mexico's top immigration official in Baja California state, which includes Tijuana.

"For Mexico, it is a step toward closing an escape route for American criminals who disappear in Mexico. Border inspectors will tap into international criminal databases. ...

More than 120 Americans expelled from Mexico this year while living in Baja California had arrest warrants in the U.S., according to Figueroa, delegate of the National Migration Institute. Some ordered to leave last year were on the FBI's most-wanted list."


Mexico now wants to ensure they can keep the criminal and undesirable Americans out of their country.

25,000 pedestrians a day cross the San Ysidro border and 17,000 of them are non-Mexican citizens. Mr Figueroa says they can currently process 1,000 passport examinations a day at San Ysidro.

At busy crossing, pedestrians need passports to enter Mexico - seattlepi.com
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Old 20-08-2015, 12:06   #68
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Señor Figueroa has it right! A few years ago I was in Ensenada and dropped into a gym in the southern end of the town for a quick workout and it was full of South Central LA gangbangers hiding out from the U.S. Authorities. Ensenada is one of the few areas in Baja Norte that has a high representation of drug dealers connected with their U.S. counterparts as is Tijauna. Personally, I'm happy to see the Mexican government doing something about it... too bad the U.S. government doesn't do the same! Phil
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Old 20-08-2015, 19:06   #69
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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Originally Posted by TacomaSailor View Post
Just to highlight the problem with KNOWING what is required - here is a quote from the official Mexican SECTUR (Secreteria de Turismo) government website:

"If you are considering a vacation in Mexico, you should consider the immigration requirements to enter our country.

Arriving in Mexico will only have to present your passport and the tourist migratory form, Transmigrants, Guest business person or visitor counselor, a form that can be obtained for free from travel agencies, airlines or at the point of entry ."


The SECTUR website does not offer an option to apply online.

In a later section it says:
"COUNTRIES THAT DO NOT REQUIRE VISA

The nationals of the following countries or regions do not require a visa to travel to Mexico and apply for admission as a Visitor without permission to perform remunerated activities."


and lists the USofA.
Entering by own boat is usually considered very differently than a tourist entering on a commercial vessel. Ship, aircraft or bus.

Does the above apply in this discussion?

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Old 20-08-2015, 19:25   #70
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

And now:

Underwater smuggler pleads guilty
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Old 20-08-2015, 19:41   #71
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

[QUOTE=leftbrainstuff;1896096]Entering by own boat is usually considered very differently than a tourist entering on a commercial vessel. Ship, aircraft or bus.

Does the above apply in this discussion?


Flying into MX in a private plane is much like going in a boat. Once you touch down they check you in . I flew down once in an antique wooden airplane. They climbed in with big boots and machine guns poked around inside then climbed back out onto the wooden wings. This happened once again at a landing strip on Baja where the governor happened to be at the time.
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Old 20-08-2015, 21:36   #72
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Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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Originally Posted by MYTraveler View Post
All the paperwork beyond that really accomplishes nothing but does deter lots of potential visitors. Coral Marina, in Ensenada, used to be so popular that reservations were required. Between the perceived violence, impounding of vessels (for months) for seemingly trivial and certainly unintentional paperwork discrepancies, fishing laws that no prohibit the take of any bluefin...has thinned considerably. It's their country and they can do what they want, but I think they are shooting themselves in the foot.
I think Gov. Schwarzenegger's changing the amount of time out of country from a short 90 days to a longer period has taken Marina Coral & Ensenada less popular too. When we went down to Mexico starting at Marina Coral in 2008 it was booming but a year later, it was a ghost town. The 90 Day Yacht Club was over.

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I'm saddened to hear about the drug dealers from US in Ensenada. It is such a great town. I wish them luck in cleaning it up. It is a tough job.
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Old 20-08-2015, 22:43   #73
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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Mexico has a problem that it has a bunch of islands off the coast just south of the US/Mexican border which are very popular fishing grounds for US fishermen.

That's not a problem, that's a national resource. The problem is the bunch of foreigners poaching fish.


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Old 21-08-2015, 09:32   #74
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

Details on the checklist for entrance into Mexico are still being put together at Southwestern Yacht Club. I've been told we should have them posted late today, and I will forward the URL when it is available.

It's always entertaining to see what "chaff" gets scattered when serious issues are discussed.
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Old 21-08-2015, 10:30   #75
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Re: Mexico enforcing its rules of entry

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Details on the checklist for entrance into Mexico are still being put together at Southwestern Yacht Club. I've been told we should have them posted late today, and I will forward the URL when it is available.
Thank you and looking forward to it.
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