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Old 16-12-2010, 05:45   #16
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The boat handlers competency card is less about ability and more about identity of the vessel user. The registration was introduced on the heels of a previously introduced zero tolerance for drinking while operating a power vessel. Imagine the cops dismay when encountering cottagers being unable to show ID while wearing their swimming trunks. The required identification makes it possible now to follow up on fines from everything to improper lighting, safety gear, etc. An Ontario Provincial Police spokesperson was heard to say that the registration didn't help them really but one would have to wonder as to why the heavy fine handed out for not having the card.
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Old 16-12-2010, 05:56   #17
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The implementation of the boater competency card is less about ability, and more about identification of the user. The program was initiated in concurance with adopting the same intolerance for drinking operating a power vessel. Imagine the cops dismay at verifying the ID of offenders, of any infractions, while being unable to view any documents that the offenders failed to produce from their swimming trunks. Why else would the fine for failure to show the card, be so steep?
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Old 16-12-2010, 06:01   #18
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The implementation of the boater competency card is less about ability, and more about identification of the user. The program was initiated in concurance with adopting the same intolerance for drinking operating a power vessel. Imagine the cops dismay at verifying the ID of offenders, of any infractions, while being unable to view any documents that the offenders failed to produce from their swimming trunks. Why else would the fine for failure to show the card, be so steep?
If this is so how would they identify the alleged offender to levy the steep fine if he/she did not have the boater competency card on them? Classic catch twenty-two situation.
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Old 16-12-2010, 06:17   #19
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This is true Vasco. I guess one way around the issue would be to boat around in the buff and reply to the officer that you must have left your wallet ashore.
I think drinking and operation of a power boat should be dealt with properly, but where I operate my boat in Georgian Bay(Honey Harbour) there are a lot more people using their cottages and waterways for fun in a safe matter and having to pay for one more Government money grap is wasted time.
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Old 16-12-2010, 18:04   #20
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They tried to justify it by saying 'Operating a boat is exactly the same as operating a car" People with that naivety are the ones who get into the most trouble . In BC , for ten months a year, I can sail for 500 miles and never pass within a quarter mile of another vessel and rarely meet one that is capable of doing more than 12 knots. Show me a highway where one can drive for 500 miles, and never pass closer than a quarter mile from another vehicle and rarely one capable of doing more than 12 knots. How woud you justify licensing cars in that situation. Its like a license to drive a horse drawn buggy, accross the prairies in the mid 1800's .
Cruising the BC coast 10 months a year since the mid 70's I have not seen any justification for a license.
Maybe the politics of envy. Those bureaucrats think we are having too much fun, to not have to pay them for it.
To that I'd suggest "Don't envy, emulate."
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Old 20-12-2010, 08:07   #21
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If we're piling on the PCOC (Canadian Pleasure Craft Operator Card) I won't miss the opportunity. Its a complete money grab by Transport Canada - has nothing to do with safety or regulation. Any fool can show up to rent a jetski or powerboat and as long as he has a pulse and a credit card they'll rent the boat to him with absolutely no requirement for the famous card. In theory they run through a checklist that compensates for the lack of the card but come on, if you tried to rent a car without a drivers' license how far would you get?

When our kids were little (under 10) we told them they couldn't drive the boat until they got their PCOC. That took them about a month. My wife sat down and wrote the exam at a trade show with no prep. She writes training material for a living and she said the exam was so poorly written that she didn't even bother reading the questions - she could tell the correct (multiple guess) answer just based on the design of the answer bank.
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Old 20-12-2010, 08:53   #22
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Well, I sail in a relatively busy area (Toronto harbour and environs) with a lot of powerboaters, many moving at high speeds. I am somewhat comforted that they are now at least required to have some minimal acquaintance with the rules of the road.

Only somewhat, mind.

OTOH, we have a fairly narrow channel out of our bay, which we share with a public dock. The channel is marked with the usual red and green buoys and outside the fairway, it is sand, with a depth of less than a couple of feet at low water. (Two summers ago, the birds were not even getting their feet wet.)

Summer entertainment is counting the number of powerboaters who drop the boat in the water and take off for the lake at high speed but outside the fairway. What are those red and green things, anyway?

I'd like to say the number has dropped since the PCOC program started, but ... sigh ... it hasn't really.

Like many others I took the PCOC test at a whim. After 10 minutes of studying the manual, I missed one question. I get to be skipper because the Admiral missed two. So it's not a searching instrument.

Bottom line, though, is I have a nice shiny card and -- combined with my Toronto harbor license, also a nice shiny card -- I can probably persuade officials elsewhere that I'm competent. So maybe that's the value ... you can put the flannel on poor befuddled harbourmasters.


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Old 28-12-2010, 00:05   #23
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Re PCOC

Transport Canada does not collect any money when a PCOC is issued. When the Operator Competency Program was created, the testing and certification was delegated to private industry. Each course provider sets their own fees.

When I certify a student, I pay a fee to CYA to process the paperwork and issue the card.

Also the card does not identify the operator. You are required to have photo ID with you as well as the card.

Originally there was going to be a grandfather clause for experienced boaters, however, it was quickly dropped. My guess is someone would have started a court challenge based on age discrimination.

For renters, there is a Boating Safety Checklist which allows a person without a card to rent a vessel, for that rental only.

The system has problems and Transport Canada has improvements coming.
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Old 28-12-2010, 01:45   #24
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I'm coming up for a couple months this summer, do I need one before then to cruise in Canadian waters?
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Old 28-12-2010, 05:50   #25
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If you will be operating your craft in Canadian waters for more than 45 consecutive days you need the card.
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Old 28-12-2010, 05:57   #26
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I'm coming up for a couple months this summer, do I need one before then to cruise in Canadian waters?
Officially if you are in Canadian waters for more than 45 days then yes. In reality its unlikely you will get checked and if you did get checked its unlikely the TC inspector would know the relevant reg. In Canadian waters enforcement is the responsibility of TC, not the Coast Guard.
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Old 28-12-2010, 06:14   #27
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I wonder. How close does one to shore before one must register with the Canadians? 200, 12, 3 miles?
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Old 28-12-2010, 07:48   #28
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I wonder. How close does one to shore before one must register with the Canadians? 200, 12, 3 miles?
For fisheries purposes, Canada has a 200-mile limit. Dunno how that plays into the discussion?

FWIW, I don't know anyone who's ever been asked for the PCOC. BUt then, I mostly know old, grey, sailors and we don't tend to get stopped by the cops or CG.

Could happen, of course.


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Old 28-12-2010, 07:51   #29
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If we're piling on the PCOC (Canadian Pleasure Craft Operator Card) I won't miss the opportunity. Its a complete money grab by Transport Canada ...
BULL!
As a matter of fact, Transport Canada doesn’t collect any fees at all for the PCOC program.
About 60 private sector course providers are accredited by Transport Canada to deliver boating safety courses and tests and issue Pleasure Craft Operator Cards. Prices and services vary among these private sector course providers.

National Pleasure Craft Operator Competency Program - Transport Canada
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Old 28-12-2010, 08:14   #30
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45 days? What do you supose that's about? Seems it would be just as "dangerous" in the first 45 as the second. Especially if they allow a dip over the line to enable another 45 days of boating with out the card. Are they saying that by spending 45 consecutive days in their culture one becomes an unsafe boater? Plainly they are saying the whole thing is bogus and has nothing to do with safety but is a way to generate moneyflow iether for another special interest group who lobbied for such legislation or for the taxes it might generate? Perhaps its roots come from the creation of more government paying jobs programs, job security of sorts for those who make/ regulate/enforce the rules-if they can pull this one over on the public (it will make boating safer?) they will have something to do yet they clearly don't believe it is nescessary to pass the test or have the card (except for their citizens).While transpot canada may not get anything from the fee charged for the test, they make their living from the taxes charged to their citizens....Or its just a way to saitsfy someones gripe or relieve legal obligations of some kind?
People are strange animals, aren't we?
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