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Old 15-04-2007, 13:52   #1
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Yet another teak finish question

Iíve read a number of past discussions on teak finishes, but still havenít found an answer to my question. What treatment would you use on an interior teak table that you will be eating off of? This particular (new) table has never had anything on it, and it is the quality of teak that is really (naturally) oily.
Thanks in advance.
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Old 15-04-2007, 13:58   #2
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Lots of coats of epiphanes satin (rubbed effect) varnish.... follow the instructions.
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Old 15-04-2007, 14:53   #3
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Will it adhere?

Iíve never varnished teak before Ė especially this oily (yet new) teak. Will it adhere?
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Old 15-04-2007, 15:35   #4
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Interior teak will last 50 years with regular varnish if there is no sun (from open hatches)

Go for it..

Clean and sand good before first coat.
Use 50/50 varnish with Penetrol first time, then varnish.
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Old 15-04-2007, 19:34   #5
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I agree with varnishing, however I'd suggest sealing it with a coat or two of epoxy. I'm a West System fan - if you go this route, use 105 with 207 special hardener. The varnish would last longer this way, and if in the future you decided to put a different sort of coating on, you wouldn't have to heavily sand your wood.

Post of picture of what you do!

Best of luck!
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Old 20-09-2007, 08:02   #6
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I've read that rubbing the teak with mineral spirits or aectone first will aid the varnish in adhering. It dries the topcoat out to give the varnish a less oily surface to stick to. Never tried it myself, but it makes sense.
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Old 20-09-2007, 08:35   #7
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Polyurethane?

Would there be a reason to not use a polyurethane finish? I've had very good results with both water-based and oil-based poly finishes on interior wood surfaces, for structural stuff like trim and doors as well as for furniture pieces that get hard use. I prefer the water-based because it produces so little in the way of VOCs, odors, and toxic fumes, and it dries really quickly. You can't beat the soap and water cleanup for your brushes and spray equipment, either. I used to think the oil-based poly was tougher, but I happened to bump into a MinWax company rep at a store who showed me some research publications, saying that the water-based poly is actually harder after it is completely dry. But I still think the oil-based poly might be a good finish for your oily teak.

I like the poly for several reasons. After a first coat to seal and raise the grain for final sanding, a second coat is usually sufficient for a piece that doesn't get hard use, like, say, door trim. If it's a table or bar top, I'll throw on a third or fourth coat, sanding lightly in between to knock off any nibs that show up. (Seems like there's always one little bug doing the backstroke in the paint!) For final finish, a quick rub with 400 paper and then 0000 steel wool, and it gleams like glass (even the bug spot!).

It is easy to spot-repair a poly-coated table. Sand out the damage, and re-apply just like the original, using 0000 steel wool to blend the new into the old when you're done. It's quick and it's as good as new.

I have learned that polyurethane tends to yellow with long-term UV exposure, so I wouldn't use it outside anywhere. For interior stuff that gets a little UV through openings, it's hard to say. An exterior spar/poly finish might be better. I have used that on exterior doors, but not any that I was able to observe over long periods. The exterior spar/poly that I have used has a yellow tint to it that changes the color of the wood, which is usually not desirable. On dark wood, you wouldn't notice too much. Regular poly is simply crystal clear, no color. I do hate to refinish exterior wood doors that have the old-fashioned varnish on them, all cracked and flaking from moisture and UV. That is a major PITA.

Good luck with the project! I'd like to hear what you decide to do and how it turns out.
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Old 20-09-2007, 11:06   #8
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Try HMGs varnish HMG Marine Paint - Bright Work / Marine Varnish . When we went through the process of finding a varnish for the interior I actually coated some pieces of wood and then after liking the visual results put them in the dish washer. HMG looks great, doesn't add any extra color to the wood (one of our qualifications), has a good UV inhibitor (even interior sun gets to the wood) , and is easy to apply. Much of our application (finally perfected after many trials) looks almost as good as sprayed.
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Old 20-09-2007, 11:38   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post
I agree with varnishing, however I'd suggest sealing it with a coat or two of epoxy. I'm a West System fan - if you go this route, use 105 with 207 special hardener. The varnish would last longer this way, and if in the future you decided to put a different sort of coating on, you wouldn't have to heavily sand your wood.

Post of picture of what you do!

Best of luck!
Aaron N.

ABSOLUTELY.......I AGREE

I did some doors in my boat with two coats of West Epoxy slightly thined with acetone then sand smooth. Then two or three coats of the epiphanes Rubbed Effect Varnish applied with a foam and thined with mineral spirits. The result is just amazing ....it looks better than a sprayed on factory finish.
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Old 20-09-2007, 18:14   #10
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"Bristol" two part urethane finish, 100 times more durable than any traditional varnish, looks much better also!
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Old 20-09-2007, 18:39   #11
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Honey Teak. Bottom line. You will never have to do it again.
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Old 21-09-2007, 04:38   #12
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Old shipwrights secret for best varnish finish (on all woods) - 50/50 with thinners for first coat, light sandpaper key prior to all subsequent coats, but stand varnish tin in a pot of boiling water prior to last coat, allow varnish to heat before applying, you'll get twice the shine!
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Old 21-09-2007, 05:38   #13
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Teak sealer good idea?

The instructor of the varnishing class at the Port Townsend WA wooden boat festival a couple weeks ago recommended sealing any wood where oils continue to come out (like teak) with Maxrite. She said it's very toxic but essential on teak prior to varnishing.

What is the general opinion on sealing teak prior to finishes like Bristol, Armada, varnish, or urethane for that matter?

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