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Old 21-03-2006, 11:08   #16
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Glad to hear you made out ok.
3/4" Holes may not be large enough, as you don't want to fish the cables through “snug” holes in the bulkheads. They should be “bushed” against chafe.
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Old 28-03-2006, 07:34   #17
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Gordo--

Subsequent to our last exchange, I have drilled 14 holes in bulkheads, epoxy coated the raw edges and lined them with closed cell foam bushing material and we are now pulling cable. However, I've discovered that the 2/0 cable, while supple, doesn't like the serpentine path required from under the forepeak berth, through the linen locker and into the chain-locker. The question is whether one might make this last 6' or so with lighter weight cable from junction blocks. According to the Maxwell handbook that accompanied the Windlass, a 6' run should be doable with #2 AWG which would be much easier to deal with than the 2/0 Cable in the chain locker. Your thoughts will be appreciated.

On a related issue regardiing the lugs we've been using with the 2/0 cable, I found that this cable definately does not like to be twisted. Given that, what I've been doing is preparing the cable ends for swaging to the lugs, attaching the lugs to the related posts and then slipping the cable ends into the lugs and marking the alignment with a black marker. Although the cable has to be extracted (in some cases) to make the swages, once done, the lugs align perfectly with the terminal posts which eliminates the need for any twist in the cable.

N'any case, any observations on the reduced cable size mentioned above will be welcome.

Cheers,

s/v HyLyte


PS: I'll post some snaps of the final installation if anyone is interested.
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Old 28-03-2006, 08:08   #18
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I strongly urge you to maintain the cable continuity (no splices/junctions, & no size reduction), if at all possible (I understand it’s not a perfect world, and admire your tenacity through 7 bulkheads).

Maxwell is permitting a 6 Ft run of #2AWG cable, based upon a total distance of 6 Ft, not a combined distance of 24 Ft of #2/0, plus 6 Ft of #2.

The mixed circuit (48' total #2/0 + 12' #2 tot.) has about 20% more cable resistance than the preferred 60' of all #2/0. The (4) additional terminations (at junction block) could, over time, double the circuit resistance.

“Flagging” the lug terminations (as you have), to avoid ‘twist’ at the posts, is always recommended. Well done!

Slip a Clear Heat Shrink Sleeve over the cables before final crimping - then crimp, label cable, and shrink seal.
Slip a clear vinyl hose over the lug & cable prior to bolting on. The hose should fit snugly over the lug, acting as an “anti-short” insulator, when pulled back over a temporarily removed lug.
Grease the Lugs and terminal post, prior to final bolting, with an Anti-Oxidant, such as:
Burndy “Penetrox”, Ideal “Noalox”, or GB “OxGard”, etc.

Looking foreward to the pics.

HTH, don’t hesitate to ask for further clarification,
Gord
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Old 28-03-2006, 12:16   #19
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I wouldlike to add to the list of protective greases, Lanocoat. Very very very good and non-toxic. Although I don't recomend eating Can also double as hairgel if you are a Kiwi bloke. But then REAL Kiwi Blokes don't use hairgel. Aftershave or underarm perhaps?
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Old 30-03-2006, 18:54   #20
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An Up-Date...

Based upon everyone's responses, I rejected the idea of reducing the cable size to the Windlass from under the forecabin berth and have held fast with the 2/0 Cable through-out. This has proven a trial in the forward linen locker however but it has survived intact (tho' I can't say as much for my joints!).

After fighting to get lugs on some of the cut cable ends, I have come up with a trick for fitting the lugs that others might like to know. After taping and cutting the cable with a Drummel Tool Reinforced Cut-Off Wheel (which makes a far cleaner cut than does a fine tooth hack-saw) I cut through the cable insulation the depth of the lug from the cable end with a very sharp box cutter. With that, one can slide the severed cable insulation toward the cut end enough to allow one to tighten a nylon wire tie around the exposed strands. Even pulled very tight, the nylon cable tie can be slid toward the end of the cable until the original insulation falls off (of its own accord). With that, one can insert the cut end of the cable into a lug which, rotated in a clock-wise direction, neatly accepts the wire and pushes the wire-tie back. Once the wire tie bottoms out at the cable cover, one can easily snip it off and bottom out the lug without damaging any of the cable strands.

While I previously mentioned the trick of placing the lug over the stud before swaging and marking the lug and cable with a line to deal with the alignment of the cable without having to try to twist the cable--I have further refined this by taping the lug and cable together with some clear Scotch packaging tape before attempting to swage the lug in place. In my case I'm using a very large Nico-Press tool for the swages--which come out very nice--but as I have very limited use of my left arm and hand (which is why we're installing a windlass) I found it somewhat difficult to maintain the alignment of the cable and lug while manipulating the swaging tool. The packing tape eliminates the problem and is easily removed once the swage is complete with a few seconds blast from the heat gun I'm using for the heat-shrink tubing. The 3:1 heavy wall heat-shrink tubing makes for a very nicely finished connection.

The one thing I hadn't counted on was that installing one's own cabling would involve a career change! I go by the addage of measure twice cut once but on some occassions it's been measure 4x and hope for the best! Gordo--per your instructions I bushed all of the bulk-head penetrations with 3/16" closed cell foam, but pulling the cable has been something of a trial, eased only by liberal doses of Sailkote!

N'any case, tomorrow I should be able to finish up--which is what I've been telling my wife every night since last Saturday!

Cheers,

s/v HyLyte
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Old 30-03-2006, 19:08   #21
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Yeah.

Nowdays, using a grinding wheel or a Dremel does has it's advantages, in getting the job done. Over a hacksaw. Been there done that!!
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Old 05-04-2006, 09:05   #22
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More follow up...

Well--predictably--it turned out that "finishing-up" took two daze instead of just one more although I did do a successful test operation of the Windlass on Saturday night (at about 2030!). Fortunately, all of the circuits tested clean (after one minor glitch) and all of the indicator lights came on so we plugged in the hand-held remote, took a flash-light on deck and, with crossed fingers, puched the button. Success!

With that, I called it a night and and left the clean-up and reassembly of the joinery to Sunday--an all day job as it turned out. At this juncture, there is only the final labeling of the cables and the protective covers to add.

We started with this:



Progressed to this:



Then this...



Then this...



The duel direction controller is mounted in the 2' x 3' x 3' space under the forward berth below the linen locker:



(And will be shielded with a plastic basket adapted as a cover!).

Per Gordo's instructions, the bulkhead penetrations are bushed with 3/16" foam like this:



(The "fingers" to hold the foam secure while the cable is pulled can be removed ex post facto") The cabling will be covered with foam backed vinyl liner material. (The cable supports are at about 12" on center and are just out of this frame).

The hand-held controller cables are connected through a fused junction box in the forward linen locker:



Although not visable, the junction/fuse box is bolted to the bulk-head (the indicator light confirms power to the hand-held remote on the foredeck!)

N'any case, I'll add a few more snaps to this post as I get them.

Cheers!

s/v HyLyte
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Old 05-04-2006, 09:17   #23
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Nice Installation - bet your happy you have that larger cable now.
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Old 05-04-2006, 12:52   #24
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OH NOOOOOO!!!!!!, you've used Yellow cable for the negative.Negative electrons won't flow down yellow Just in case you still didn't see the double set of faces, I am joking.
Good work. I would suggest, if any cables are in view, to use a low profile flat plastic conduit to tidy up and protect the wires, especially the smaller ones. It will help to make the installation look neat, but the main point is to protect the cables from being caught by something and tension being put on terminal connections.
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Old 05-04-2006, 16:34   #25
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Just a few...

...more Snaps that I didn't have time for earlier:

The power supply at the engine space battery bank:



My splices are those with the heat-shrink. (Now that I've learned how to do this, I'll be improving the splices done by my supposedly expert electrician.) Althought it's difficult to see, the battery posts are actually covered with clear plastic tubing.

The Windlass Control Breaker with power-on indicator lamp is in the cabinet at the foot of the companionway steps where it can be seen from the cockpit:



and...



The Red LED Indicator Lamp next to the switch glows quite brightly when the circuit is activated.

A view of the motor drive with wiring (which has not yet been sealed or covered):



I tried to make "shoulders" on the lugs with the heat-shrink but after the first it was evident that I didn't have adaquate space between the posts for that. The posts and lugs have been treated with several coats of spray-on Corrision Guard (which forms a plastic like film) and they are now coated with several coats of "liquid latex" plastic coating.

A better view of the drive motor and wiring:



The drive motor will be covered with a heavy plastic enclosure (courtesy of Tupperware) and the cables will be covered with closed cell foam pipe insulation courtesy of the plumbing department at Lowes and then encased in a 4" dia. accordion type black plastic air-ducting conduit (also also from Lowes) for protection. The gray plastic box in the background (from the electrical dept. at Lowes) holds the connector for the hand-held windlass controller.

The "control box"...



... also has a separately powered circuit with a switch for a 7.5 GMP "wash-down pump" situated in the forward head (the hose is to the right of the frame) and a power take-off plug to allow us to plug in a spot-light at the bow. The circuit is switched at the main panel and an indicator light illuminates when its activated. (Again, this circuit is separate from the Windlass power which also supplies the hand held controller.) The wiring is sealed into the weather-proof box thru a hole drilled through a synthetic wine bottle cork (courtesy of the "Fat Bastard" Winery). When squeezed into the tube at the bottom of the box, the "cork" compressed around the wireing sufficiently tightly to seal the enclosure. (We assured this with a "wet run" by filling the box with water before the wiring was added and using a scrap of wire through the cork. If water couldn't escape--it didn't--it won't be able to get in either!)

Finally, in addition to the wired hand-held controller, we also have a "Quick" wireless controller that I purchased for about $135.00 through "MariSafe" (at http://www.marisafe.com/ ) which is located here in the Sarasota area (a great company with excellant prices!). With that we can deploy and retrive the anchor from anywhere aboard the ship although I'll also have the wired controller plugged in whan we're using it, just to be safe.

N'any case, we'll follow up with some final snaps once I've finished the job entirely.

Cheers,

s/v HyLyte
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Old 06-04-2006, 03:52   #26
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Well done !
Gord May, Master Electrician, Boatwright
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Old 25-01-2010, 20:27   #27
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A Job Well Done!

svHyLyte,

Very nice job!
Deserves to go to the front of the class so others can admire.

Cheers,
Extemp.
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Old 13-01-2011, 11:56   #28
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Windlass Installation

I wonder if we could get the mods to change the title on this thread to Windlass Installation as it would be so much easier to find for people who want to know how it should be done. Beautiful job.
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