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Old 09-09-2008, 10:54   #16
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My son's 26' schooner had the same problem with internal scrap steel/concrete ballast, except that it was even worse. The fiberglass covering it on the inside was very poorly done, so the ballast got wet often. We injected epoxy into all known voids, added several layers of glass to the outside of the hull from bow to stern to halfway up to the waterline since the original glass was quite thin and had deteriorated, glassed over the inside from bow to stern of the ballast, and, since we are both a little crazy, rebuilt the interior while extending the cabin a foot and a half to the stern.

I don't even want to think of the hours of work, but it was tolerable as it was spread out over six or seven years (I know, I know, its a long time to be without a boat). We both like to work on boats and putter around, which also helped.

Was it worth it? Considering that one forgets the hard work as time goes by, and will always have the beautiful result, YES, it was worth it. It helps a lot that this schooner is a rare and beautiful boat that is a lot of fun to sail.

So if the boat will be worth it, if you like to putter around with boats and if you have the time; go for it. Otherwise, I understand it is a buyer's market; you could go look at a few boats for sale to help you answer the question of whether to continue fixing this one or buy another. Don't forget that buying another boat may expose you to a whole new set of problems.
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Old 10-09-2008, 20:46   #17
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That's a really pretty boat there.
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Old 10-09-2008, 21:19   #18
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Thanks, its a Van Dyne Tancook Whaler, about 25 - 30 yrs old. When my son earned his first $ in high school, he bought it instead of a car, sailed it for a summer or two and then started renovations/restorations that lasted about 8 years. We finally go it back on the water last summer. We still need to paint the topsides.

Fair winds
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Old 11-09-2008, 02:27   #19
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I've heard of people mixing lead shot with resin, and pouring that into the keel. Won't be as risky as pouring molten lead in, but a bit more expensive. If you use epoxy resin get the slowest hardner you can find, and do it in stages. Epoxy should bond the lead in pretty well though.
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Old 12-09-2008, 07:05   #20
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It is true BUT...we are talking ballast. The weight for volume of lead shot is quite poor. A large amount of voids. Flat sheets is better. molten is obviously a crapy and dangerous job but best in terms of weight down low. It is worth doing comparisons. solid and I do mean SOLID steel can work out quite comparable to loose lead. As someone who has poured lead keels I would not recommend it unless you take all due precautions. But if you want the weight down low and space for tankage, there is no comparison. As an aside...regardless of what you use. IF your ballast is well held in place and you lid over and use it as a diesel tank, corrosion of any kind is lessened. Just another possibility....

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