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Old 01-04-2010, 16:42   #46
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Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Obviously, Nick doesn’t yet have arthritis.
Aha! and that reminds me I reach for the vice grips nowadays ;-) But no, I do not have those aboard as I left 2/3 of all my tools ashore (sold or given away) when we moved aboard. I can still cry about not having some of them...

For holding nuts, vice grips are okay, but not adjustable- or pipe-wrenches or regular pliers. You'll be needing lots of nuts when using those ;-)

cheers,
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Old 01-04-2010, 18:11   #47
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Daddle, that's a snap tool.
It grabs the head of a snap so you don't yank that fabric and tear the snap out.
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Old 01-04-2010, 18:15   #48
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Seriously, your toolkit isn't complete without this tool...

Okay, actually I have no idea what it is for, but it came with the boat, looks important, looks like it's for pulling on something....it's one piece of solid aluminum, no moving parts.....

So, know it all tool guys, what is it for??
Looks like a tool to help snap on your tarp. Slide it onto the head of the snap and you have a handle to pull it tight and snap it.

Edit: Sorry, I answered when I read the post and then noticed someone else had answered after I finished reading the whole thread.
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Old 01-04-2010, 18:51   #49
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I needed some screwdrivers when away from home a few years back for a one off job - picked up some cheapies from a market. Still have them and use them as my no.1 pick............

Not only are the philips dayglow green and the flathead in dayglow orange , but each has a nut head on the shaft (under the handle) so I can fit a spanner on, that extra bit of oomph is really useful especially when putting weight on.....................probably old hat to many of you, but not seen it before or since.


I also carry an axe (short handle )...........
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Old 01-04-2010, 20:49   #50
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Leatherman, Sandpaper, dykes. That's about it.
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Old 01-04-2010, 20:54   #51
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1. A set of nut drivers! Too many clamps on the boat not have a handy 1/4 through 1/2 inch. Much easier than a ratchet and socket.
2. A quality ratchet with as fine of tooth as you can get. Makes those tight places a little easier to do.
3. Voltage testers. At least one GOOD ONE and some cheap ones. The advantage of getting the cheap ones from Harbour Fright is that they are small, cheap and can test diodes and if it breaks, break out one of the other 3 that you have.
4. An adjustable heat pencil tip soldering iron with rope cutting attachment.
5. Magnifying glass, glasses.
6. A good LED head light like the Pelican 2680. It is a little expensive (50 bucks) and a little heavy, but throws a powerful spot beam. Not anemic beam like other headlights.
7. In conjunction with your battery drill an electric drill. Need the higher speed of the electric for efficient drilling of stainless steel.
8. Sawsall, either battery or electric.
9. Laser temperature gun reader
10. Tachometer reader.
11. Dremel tool kit
12. Drill bits. Lots and lots and don't scrimp on the quality! Numbered, fractional and lettered.
13. Tap and die sets. Both SAE and Metric. All engines regardless where built have both types of fasteners. At least one and the odds are that the one oddball is the one going to cause all the problems.
14. More than one of each Screwdriver. I said that I wouldn't need more than one #3 Phillips. The first time I used my #3 snap on Phillips it broke. First time in 25 years a #3 broke on me. Also get the stubbys from either husky or proto. They are only an inch long and have a depression in the top for your finger. You will thank yourself once you need them. Both standard and Phillips. Snap on doesn't make good ones anymore.
15. A nut breaker!!!!!!!!!!!!
16. A leatherman utility tool. 2 if you’re smart.
17. A set of metric and SAE open/box end wrenches. I have both regular snap on of these and the Gear wrench with the ratcheting box end. And a stubby set also.
18. Allen wrenches. Both Metric and SAE with the ball on the long end.
19. A quality set of 3/8's universal sockets with plenty of extensions.
20. Grip Tite sockets from Sears. They really work!! Don't leave dock with out them! Also get another set of rounded bolt head or nut removers from Sears also.
21. Some carbide cutting tools that you can put into your drill to grind metal.
22. At least one of each 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8 twelve point socket in SAE and Metric for your engine if you have tight difficult spots to work.
23. Rubber hammers and dead blow hammer.
24. Scribes, several
25. Extension mirrors. Small, medium and large. A couple of each as they break at times.
26. Putty knives and single edge razors from habour freight.
27. Good set of wood and metal chisels.
28. Punch set. Both tapered and straight.
29. Dissimilar metal tape and paste. The paste is tef-gel and tuf-gel.

This is just a beginning for self sufficiency. There are a lot more that others can add. I did not even touch air conditioning and heating and very little electrical. And as always, is just my 2 cents worth.
WD
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Old 01-04-2010, 22:20   #52
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Wow

that WOULD leave a mark!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
About holding nuts: none of the wrenches mentioned are any good for that. You need this nut plier from Bahco for that:

ciao!
Nick.
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Old 01-04-2010, 22:53   #53
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t...Need the higher speed of the electric for efficient drilling of stainless steel.
Hmmm...odd...stainless steel drills better with really slow speed and huge pressure, with lube. Once it heats and hardens it's game over. But maybe you have some other technique.
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Old 02-04-2010, 00:23   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David_Old_Jersey View Post
I needed some screwdrivers when away from home a few years back for a one off job - picked up some cheapies from a market. Still have them and use them as my no.1 pick............

Not only are the philips dayglow green and the flathead in dayglow orange , but each has a nut head on the shaft (under the handle) so I can fit a spanner on, that extra bit of oomph is really useful especially when putting weight on.....................probably old hat to many of you, but not seen it before or since.


I also carry an axe (short handle )...........
Cheap screwdrivers have never worked for me. They are extremely demanding of quality of metal at the tips. Some other cheap tools work ok for me, but I always buy the best screwdrivers I can find, cost no object.

Makes it more painful, however, when they slide beneath the waves after taking one bounce off the stem fitting, I do admit.

That axe might come in handy in the Gulf of Aden. I think you mean hatchet, however.
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Old 02-04-2010, 16:15   #55
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Daddle,
I thought that also until a Boeing aircraft machinist told me that the proper drill speed for 316 stainless is 90 to 150 surface meters per minute. So say you choose the middle of the SFM of 120 with a .250 to .300 size drill, your rpms on your drill should be around 1300 rpm. This will give you a drill rate (or penatration rate) of slightly over 5 inches per minute. Battery drills generally don't go that fast, but electric ones will. I just learned this a couple of days ago. Besides, stainless steel is not all that hard.
WD
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Old 02-04-2010, 16:35   #56
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I carry a good size tool kit, but....

... I try to remember why the builder used foam core, biaxial cloth, and aluminum. Then I decide.
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Old 02-04-2010, 16:35   #57
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yesssssssss.

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16. A leatherman utility tool. 2 if you’re smart.
Ohhhhhhhh. I just picked up a Leatherman Skeletool CX for my recent Baja trip. Ohhhhhhh. One of my students borrowed it to cut through a dozen beer cans. Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh. Didn't dull the blade at all.

From now on I carry two leathermans. The new one for me, the old one to loan to students.
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Old 02-04-2010, 16:35   #58
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Hot knife through butter...

I found that with the correct angles on a sharp drill, a cheap drill press on slowest speed, moderate pressure and a touch of cutting oil stainless drills real easy.

Unfortunately if I get any of the above even slightly wrong the $!*% stuff work hardens and I have a real mess on my hands...
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Old 02-04-2010, 17:10   #59
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I'm not so into it as IceMan but use tables instead. RPMs change with materials and diameter bits. The tables are often available on a sign on a drill press. IceMan got it right though: full details here: Curious Inventor - Guides : Metal Working : Drill Speeds

cheers,
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Old 02-04-2010, 18:11   #60
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Stainless is funny stuff. Some will work harden as soon as you look at it.
It really depends on the alloy and the condition or heat treatment or aging.
As a general rule you can't go wrong by going slow.
For over 35 years I have worked and then owned a machine shop and I have never seen any charts hanging around. I have looked up things but the bottom line is, that's a starting point and you have to adjust speeds and feeds to the job. If it works don't fix it.

When the chips are blue, you will be too.
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