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Old 29-12-2008, 15:08   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian Van H View Post
Has anyone on the forum ever had a problem with a butt splice made with a good (3M or Ancor) connector with the built in adhesive lined shrink tubing? I find it hard to believe they can EVER go bad under normal use. Seems like we should be talking about better wire runs and connections before leaving out the protector...

The splicing rules I follow on my boat is:

If the splice is not subject to a harsh environment and not servicing a piece of critical equipment, I will use either a buss bar, or a heat shrink butt connector followed with 2- 3 coats of liquid tape.

If the splice is subject to a harsh environment regardless of its service, I solder then heat shrink with a 2 1/2 - 3" length of tube and then apply 3-4 coats of liquid tape.

I may be anal, but I just dont feel comfortable using the heat shrink butt connectors without liquid tape.

I would be interested in other's opinions (but dont think Im gonna change mine, like I said, its an anal thing! )

BTW

I really appreciate you guys posting your opinions without all the crybaby BS that seems to be spreading on this board.
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Old 30-12-2008, 01:13   #17
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I don't have too much experience with tiny splices on 12V circuits but in the high voltage business sometimes heatshrink tube is the only protection for 100,000V splices that are sometimes submerged in water for a prolonged period of time. The difference is that the internal surface of the tube is covered with an adhesive. During the process of applying heat the adhesive melts and seal the joint. It is nothing wrong with the use of liquid tape if the heat shrink connectors have internal adhesive. In such case IMHO the use of liquid tape is an overkill.

Chris

BassAckwards - expect discussion on using soldered connections vs crimped
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Old 30-12-2008, 03:28   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlF
... My favorite splice technique is to thread two pieces of adhesive shrink wrap on before making the crimp. First a 3" piece is put over the connector. Then a 6" piece is put over the 3" piece.
Good technique, Carl.
The first inner piece should be Adhesive Lined, the second outer piece could be un-lined.
I insert my identification label (colour code if required, number, & words) under the clear outer shrink.
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Old 30-12-2008, 04:01   #19
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For a much earlier discussion on terminating, see:
"Ohm's Law & Boats"

Jerry Powlas, Technical Editor of “Good Old Boat” magazine, also did some real-life testing of terminations, heat rise, and voltage drop. His results are published on-line at:
March 2002 Electrical Wiring Resistance Test Results ~ by Jerry Powlas
* Summary of Testing Crimp Splices
* Crimp Splice Test Details
* General Conclusions
* Final Conclusions

Goto: Welcome to BOATPRO


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodz View Post
... in the high voltage business sometimes heatshrink tube is the only protection for 100,000V splices that are sometimes submerged in water for a prolonged period of time. The difference is that the internal surface of the tube is covered with an adhesive. During the process of applying heat the adhesive melts and seal the joint. It is nothing wrong with the use of liquid tape if the heat shrink connectors have internal adhesive. In such case IMHO the use of liquid tape is an overkill.
Chris
BassAckwards - expect discussion on using soldered connections vs crimped
I’m probably out of date, but in my day, most high voltage splices were sealed using cold shrink sleeves with tape and resin. The principle remains the same as Chris describes.

I don’t like the “hard spot” that solder creates at the end of it’s “wick”, and seldom solder any connection. I don’t recommend solder, even as an adjunct to a proper crimp, to anyone not expert in the technique. ABYC doesn't permit solder-only terminations, except on large battery lugs.
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Old 30-12-2008, 05:25   #20
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As far as solder goes, on a buttsplice followed by adhesive lined heat shrink, there shouldn't be a problem (The heat shrink should support and isolate the joint). Where solder hurts is anyplace where flex or vibration can get to a joint, like a hard mounted ring or tab terminal. The solder wicks up the wire away from the joint and creates a hard spot prone to failure. There is NO arguing this, as I have seen it dozens of times where a wire is soldered to the movable contacts on relays (I'm an elevator repairman). The failure is ALWAYS right above the joint in the hardened area. I am interested if anyone has ever seen an adhesive lined connection fail. Home well pump wires have been spliced this way for years, and are buried otherwise unprotected in the ground...
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Old 30-12-2008, 11:23   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
For a much earlier discussion on terminating, see:
"Ohm's Law & Boats"

Jerry Powlas, Technical Editor of “Good Old Boat” magazine, also did some real-life testing of terminations, heat rise, and voltage drop. His results are published on-line at:
March 2002 Electrical Wiring Resistance Test Results ~ by Jerry Powlas
* Summary of Testing Crimp Splices
* Crimp Splice Test Details
* General Conclusions
* Final Conclusions

Goto: Welcome to BOATPRO.

Thanks for the information. I have just lightly scanned it and see that it will be a good read. The link you provided to Boat Pro didnt work. Here is another.


Good Old Boat - March 2002 Electrical Wiring Resistance Test Results



<< The testing did, in a general way, prove the superiority of ratcheting crimpers, tinned wire, Ancor brand crimp connectors, and (probably) dressing wire strands with an anti corrosion coating like Vaseline before assembling the crimp.>>

This statement was ambiguous as to whom suggests using Vaseline, do you Gord? If so would you elaborate as to exactly how it should be applied? ie: just glob it on or rub it in to encapsulate each wire strand, etc.

Again, thanks for the 'edu-maka sion'
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Old 30-12-2008, 11:50   #22
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Originally Posted by BassAckwards View Post
... This statement was ambiguous as to whom suggests using Vaseline, do you Gord? If so would you elaborate as to exactly how it should be applied? ie: just glob it on or rub it in to encapsulate each wire strand, etc.
I’m embarrassed to admit that I did include Petroleum Jelly in my list of anti-oxidants. I must have been trying to make the article "cheap-skate friendly".
My preferred products are Burndy “Penetrox” (slightly thicker) and Ideal “No-Alox” (slightly thinner).
Any of these is just slathered over the entire wire, just gob it on.
Quoted from Ohm’s Law & Boats:
Sealants & Anti-Oxidant Compounds:
There are numerous compounds, suitable for protecting joints,
but ensure that the product is suitable for ‘use on energized circuits’.
Sealants:
- Starbright “Liquid Electrical Tape”
- 3-M “Scotchkote-Electrical Coating” & “#1602/1603 Insulating Sealers”
Anti-Oxidants:
- “Corrosion X” Penetrant
- Ideal “No-Alox”, Burndy “Penetrox”, GB “Ox-Guard”
- Vaseline (Petroleum Jelly), tho’ it liquefies @ higher temperatures.
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Old 30-12-2008, 13:57   #23
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Gord, your link to BoatPro doesn't seem to work. Oops, never mind. Thanx BassAckwards.
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Old 30-12-2008, 14:08   #24
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Gord, with Penetrox it has to be explained that there are couple of lubricants under the same name which composition are different. The one which we could apply on our boats is "Penetrox E" which is designed for using on coper-coper connections. By the way, I use this penetrant also as a protection against siezing whenever I work on my car and it has worked perfectly for years.
Chris
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